Detail packing for long trips

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Packing for a routine week’s trip in familiar areas is one thing; packing for a long trip in remote areas demands a whole nother ball of attention. It’s much the same as “washing” the truck vs “detailing” the truck (of which my trip prep includes neither, although I did vacuum the carpet).

I’ve been through the gear list thrice. I’ve repaired everything that was wearing out and checked everything from stove to first aid kit to water filter(s) to make sure they are stocked and functional.

I have packed and (and repacked) the truck, added additional gear tie down under the cap, made sure that the items I routinely need are the most accessible (the stuff I don’t need for the first couple of weeks can be buried below).

I’ve changed the oil in the truck and tuned up the canoe, tightening machine screw bolts and etc. I’ve been sewing worn gear (ugh), changing batteries, charging devices and selecting annotated maps and guides. Printing research. Contact far-flung friends along the route for a possible visit. Looking at road maps, river guides and the weather websites for norms and historic highs & lows in the places I’ll be camped.

I’ve stocked on hard-to-find consumables (freeze dry meals, Starbucks Via, iso-butane canisters, decent beer). I finally got a set of chains for the truck in case the mountain passes are closed or the dirt roads are snowmelt mud. Hell, I’ve even printed out the gas tax for all 50 States so I know where best to fill up.

I think I am almost ready. Help a brother out – what did I overlook?
 
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No doubt you've done this prep a gajillion times, so you've got it down pat. The things I'm most likely to forget are the smaller and simpler detritus; eye glasses, extra car keys, soap, duct tape...
Happy trails Mike. This is sounding like an epic one. I hope the wind stays gently on your back.
 
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Mike,

I have a Tacoma, always make sure I have a spare lamp for the headlight and check the spare tire for long trips. Your post sounds like retirement to me....I hope I can enjoy the same pre trip prep some day. Until then, the only difference in planning trips for me is the amount of food I need to bring.

Bon Voyage,
Barry
 
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I forget the TP every freaking time.:mad:

One time we were all flying to Edmonton from different cities in the NE US. I had the bag with ALL the cooking gear, saw, stuff like that. We were supposed to meet in Edmonton and then fly to Yellowknife the next morning and then out on a float plane.

I forgot my passport and missed the flight.

Where you going anyway?
 
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Well Mike, Sounds like you've got it pretty well covered. In my tire chain container I include a pair of work gloves, coat hanger wire, pliers and enough waterproof material that I can kneel on while putting the chains on. You know the old trick of reversing one of the batteries in a flashlight so if the darn thing gets bumped "on" you won't find it dead. I love those head-lamp things; both hands are free.

Hope you have a great time!

Rob
 
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P.S. I never bring toilet paper. In the kitchen when the paper towel roll gets down to about a quarter left it gets changed out. I cut it in half and squash the roll flat. When I wipe I don't want some fuzzy stuff who's main claim to fame is that it's soft. What I wind up with is some industrial grade paper towel/T.P.

Of course the roll is useful for all kinds of other things as well.

Rob
 
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That your inspection sticker and registration are current and you can find your insurance ID without rifling through several years of expired insurance ID's.

Don't ask how I know..:mad:

Also replacement bulbs for headlight and tailight.
 
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Where on earth are you going that is so remote?

If you're headed to the north, which may involve long stretches with no fuel stops, bring a Jerry Can. Also I've heard that if you are heading to places like Alaska there is a long long highway that is all gravel and you should bring 2 spare tires not one. Other than that, how far off the beaten track can one get in the lower 48?
 
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Red...the Alaska Highway is paved. Its been paved for a while.. No need to bring a Jerry can...just plan ahead.

You can get off the beaten track in a variety of places. Only part of Maine has paved roads. There I never go in without at least 3/4 tank of gas.

Utah and Nevada are other places as well as Arizona.. Kansas takes a whole day..of nothing.. I am betting on him going out West.. Not north. Alaska paddling seems doubtful in April.
 
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The Alaska Highway may be paved, but there are often long stretches of rough construction. If you choose to head toward Dawson from Whitehorse on the Klondike Highway along the Yukon River, and especially if you then continue across the unpaved Top of the World Highway from there toward Fairbanks, you are advised to carry a couple of spare tires. Heading from Fairbanks northward to the Dalton Highway, the Yukon 1000 mile canoe race finish is at the bridge. It is 4 hours from Fairbanks, much of it on gravel road with endless oncoming trucks (the Ice Road Truckers' route to Prudhoe Bay) throwing stones and dust everywhere. A surprising high percentage of vehicles in the Yukon and Alaska have cracked windshields and don't bother to replace them. One of my race pit crew partners had FIVE (5) flat tires on a towed camper trailer, plus a broken spring that had to be replaced before continuing. Otherwise it is a pleasant drive. :cool:
 
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Stuff I've forgotten on trips (outdoor and otherwise):

TP, lighter, cup, underwear, T-shirts, cutlery, business credit card, water purification stuff, sunglasses... previous post about it being the small stuff was right.
 
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Now's the time to have a list that you can check things off on. And if you don't have one, make one using the stuff you've packed and the items mentioned in this thread. Otherwise you can look forward to forgetting something.
 
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I once arrived at the launch with 2 mismatched halves of a dubble paddle that wouldn't mate! One method to not forget things that works for me,is to run through your trip from leaving home,launch,24hrs of paddling,camping,eating and carrying in detale in my mind. I often catch things I havn't packed that way. Besides,It's fun to "enjoy the trip in advance".
Hope all goes well,Turtle
,
 
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extra car keys

Check. I am travelling with a partner and he’ll have a full set of keys – ignition, roof rack locks, tailgate lock, cap lock, pad lock key, etc and vehicle remote. On last year’s long trip I had two companions and each had a set of keys that fit everything in/on the van.

In my tire chain container I include a pair of work gloves, coat hanger wire, pliers and enough waterproof material that I can kneel on while putting the chains on. Rob

Rob, your suggestions on the “Truck outfitting” thread were very helpful. The Tacoma has 4 built in storage bins, two under the back seats and two in the bed. They contain all manner of emergency and repair equipment. So that I can remember what is stored where I have an index in one of the visors:
Under left rear seat: 12V float bag pump, rope, padlock & cables
Under right rear seat: Tire jack, fix a flat, tire patch kit, road flares, gloves
Right bed end: Jumper cables, shovel
Left bed end: Towing cable, chain, red flags, rags
Storage box behind seat: 12V tire pump, duct tape, HD carabineers, hose clamps, head net, coat hanger, bolt cutters, hacksaw, work gloves, boonie hat, hatchet.
(Plus an accessible fire extinguisher)

That your inspection sticker and registration are current and you can find your insurance ID without rifling through several years of expired insurance ID's.

Check. In a clear plastic case in the glove box. Although the truck is only a year old it was amazing how many expired registrations and insurance cards I had. Same goes for my wallet, which is now an inch skinnier than before.

Utah and Nevada are other places as well as Arizona. I am betting on him going out West.

Nailed it. Lots of dirt road travel in New Mexico, Arizona and Utah, starting with a week or so up in Coronado Nat’l Forest.

Now's the time to have a list that you can check things off on.

I have always packed with a list. Two columns, 100+ items that covers everything from travel stuff to hunting to backpacking and tripping. Over the years some things have come off the list (diapers, bear bells, snow mobile suit) and lots of stuff has been added (spray covers, sails, back band).

I used to keep separate lists for each activity but found it was easier to have a comprehensive list for everything, just in case there was some crossover. Plus when I get to the hunting section when packing for a paddling trip I can quickly cross things off and feel like I’m making real progress.
 
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One thing that was never on my list (criminally) was a back-up water supply. I had a pump filter sh*t the bed on day 2 of an 8 day trip, with no back up plan. One pump for four people. Yikes! I lucked out in that we had stocked plenty of beer, and were able to take a short drive to pick up some more propane from Raymond's country store on the Northeast Carry to boil water. Otherwise, we would have been boiling a lot of water on campfires, and harvesting water from tarps. Enjoy the trip out West! I hope to visit Coronado in early May.
-Chuck
 
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One thing that was never on my list (criminally) was a back-up water supply. I had a pump filter sh*t the bed on day 2 of an 8 day trip, with no back up plan.

We will each have a gravity filter and dromedary bags but will be travelling separately at times. Individual back ups are supersaturated iodine crystals and a LifeStraw.

I hope to visit Coronado in early May.

Chuck, what brings you to SE Arizona?

The birdlife in the Chiricahuas is awesome, and some of it is unique.

The hiking there is interesting as well; you can start out on the desert side, hike over a saddle or pass and drop down into one of the riparian valleys, passing through 3 or 4 very different habitats along the way.

(Or was, have been some large wildfires there recently)
 
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Chuck said:
Heh, a long, horrid winter in New England! We decided we needed some desert therapy, and an opportunity arrived to join some friends in Sedona. I may look into renting some boats to visit the San Juan river. And birding is definitely on the list of things to do.
 
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