J R Robertson 16’3”x 34” wood canvas canoe

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Robin you lied!! :) :) :ROFLMAO:

Good on ya for getting those ribs out. We were unsure how to do that and just epoxied the cracks.

Take pictures of your steam bag outfit when you get it ready!
 
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P.S.: What a nice job the previous owner did on the interior stripping! That alone should speed up the restoration.

That's Yellowcanoe and her husband Jim who stripped it, a fantastic job, very clean without any damage to the soft cedar ribs or planks. It's really amazing how clean this old hull is and how gentle they were with it.
Robin you lied!! :) :) :ROFLMAO:

Good on ya for getting those ribs out. We were unsure how to do that and just epoxied the cracks.

Take pictures of your steam bag outfit when you get it ready!

I know, I wasn't going to replace those two ribs but after taking some time and seeing how nice this canoe is I couldn't leave them in.
 
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Robin, what's the unfinished hull on the floor under the rack?
That’s my first wood canvas canoe, a Chestnut Pal, 16’. It’s 19 new ribs and new inwales too, but after doing all those ribs I found the bottom of the canoe rounded out, so I have it weighed down trying to flatten it out on the cement floor. In the end, I think I’ll need to use boiling water, weight on the thwarts, and my flat driveway to get the bottom less rounded.

Let me guess....

From top to bottom:
Chestnut Fox
Robertson
Chestnut Chum
Chestnut Cruiser/Kruger
Chestnut Pal

Almost Patrick, the Light green Cruiser is above the dark green Chum, but that’s a pretty good eye.

Here’s the Pal on the trail and today,

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Wow, the Pal needs quite a lot of planking. I don't think I'd have the nerve to remove so much. More likely, I would remove a couple of courses of planking- infill with new- then remove a couple more, etc. I imagine removing so much could make the canoe quite flexible and prone to getting twisted as you install new planks. Maybe not... I haven't done so much extensive re-planking.

Do you mill your own ribs and planks or have them done locally? I imagine being so close to Eastern White Cedar harvesters it might not be too difficult to find stock to mill on your own.
 
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Wow, the Pal needs quite a lot of planking. I don't think I'd have the nerve to remove so much. More likely, I would remove a couple of courses of planking- infill with new- then remove a couple more, etc. I imagine removing so much could make the canoe quite flexible and prone to getting twisted as you install new planks. Maybe not... I haven't done so much extensive re-planking.

Do you mill your own ribs and planks or have them done locally? I imagine being so close to Eastern White Cedar harvesters it might not be too difficult to find stock to mill on your own.
It had a lot more plank when I installed the new ribs, but it was cupped and split from age and water damage. No flex at all with the new inwales. I have some left over ribs from Connecticut days plus enough plank. Cedar seems pretty easy to get here.
 
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I chopped a hole in the ice on my pond and stuck 3 ribs in there to soak for a few days, then made this diy steamer that I will use with food storage bags.

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I then removed small sections of plank along the sheer line where the new ribs will go.
On a closed gunnel canoe, the ribs are sanded to a taper to fit between the inwales and plank so I needed access to the outside of the inwales.
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Well alright, got the two ribs steamed and bent over the canoe today, very happy about that. it’s been a while since I have steamed ribs and I never did it with that little rig or a bag, but it worked out well.
It’s going to be cold tonight, maybe 10 below so I’ll leave the heat on for good measure.

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Well, I got the two ribs in, then tapered the rib ends down and replaced the plank. I’m pretty happy with the results, never did a closed gunnel canoe but this looks like it will be alright.
My mentor told me I’m good for 4 hours, best to put the tools down after that. I agree, time for a cigar and a cold one.

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Does anyone have a recipe for a stain to get those two new ribs closer in color to the old ribs. Thanks
 
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Ha- I read this staring at mine wondering the same. I’m gonna try a few stains on some scraps. I’ve read on the wcha forum folks using different shades of minwax stains with success. Schuyler always said he doesn’t want it looking like an Oreo.

Bob
 
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Do you have more / similar rib stock to practice on?
Jim
Yes, I have the old cracked stripped ribs and some of the new material. I tried Gunstock, too dark, then I tried Ipswich pine, closer but not great. See photo, new cedar on the left, gunstock is the darker/Ipswich pine the lighter.

Maybe I should try some varnish but not sure what sequence.

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Your mileage may vary, but I find that Minwax Colonial Maple comes pretty close. I like to seal the whole interior with a couple of coats of shellac after staining new wood and before varnish which helps blend new wood and old too.
 
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I have a Minwax mix that I use for everything! 1 gallon Minwax Early American with 1 pint Red Mahogany mixed in. I call it the farm mix because it worked well in a house I built on my parents farm property years ago. This is one coat, wipe on and immediately wipe off. On 1x12 White Pine surface nailed flooring.

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Try mixing but do remember the proportions of the mix. 60-40 of Ipswich and Gunstock.. will darken over time as the old ribs did but I have no idea if the old ribs darkening rate now.
 
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So I tried to match the new ribs with the old, one ribs seems to match better after
I applied some thinned out Ipswich pine stain and applied the first coat of shellac but the other new rib not so great, it will have to do.F4C6EFE5-0F3D-4D22-94A2-757E533B8003.jpeg

I also repaired the rotted stem/inwale tips. Since this canoe has closed gunnels, there will be a mahogany cover over those new inwale tips so the color match is not a factor.
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