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Fun with Chat GPT

Perhaps he was really just a beta version of Chat GPT.
If AI bots learn to mimic web forum chatter we'll never know the difference.

Odyssey:

Someday this AI know-it-all may be every bit as knowledgeable and opinionated as CT, but it will never feel quite like this CT campfire.
Have to come up with a secret campfire code word.
 
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I'm curious where it gets its knowledge of paddling. I don't think there are that many good sources. I wonder how much of the content is taken from forums like this one.

I don't know where it gets all its information either but I asked about a question from another canoeing thread and, after pushing it for more information and sources, it told me it's not able to actively search the internet and is only able to use information it was taught up to September of 2022 or something like that.

I also asked it to give me the history of canoetripping.net and it told me to get real and that it didn't have information on every rinky dink website on the internet. Of course it phrased it a little nicer than that.

Alan
 
I asked it again about information sources. I'd asked it about the best technique for sit and switch paddling a short, highly rockered, canoe (recent thread on the subject) and was really surprised and impressed with what it came up with. When I asked if it was familiar with the inside arc paddling technique and how that might apply it gave me a rundown of the technique that was pretty detailed. So I just now asked it where it got its information on this technique.

As an AI language model, my responses are generated based on a mixture of licensed data, data created by human trainers, and publicly available data. I have not been directly trained on specific sources or have access to proprietary databases. I should note that while I strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, my responses may not always reflect the most current research or paddling techniques.
In the case of the "inside arc" paddling technique, the information provided is based on general knowledge of canoeing and paddling techniques. This includes my understanding of principles such as the effects of canoe rocker, body mechanics, and paddling maneuvers commonly used in canoeing.
If you're looking for more specific or detailed information on the "inside arc" technique, I would recommend consulting reputable sources such as canoeing instructional books, websites, or seeking advice from experienced paddlers or canoeing instructors who can provide firsthand knowledge and expertise on this technique.
It's always a good idea to rely on a combination of sources and seek guidance from experienced individuals to ensure you're practicing proper techniques and safety measures while paddling.


Alan
 
Alan, no cell phone so I can't get into ChatGPT......

Can you ask "what are the best online forums for wilderness canoeing?"

I'm hoping the bot is smart enough to NOT recommend paddling.net
 
I asked it again about information sources. I'd asked it about the best technique for sit and switch paddling a short, highly rockered, canoe (recent thread on the subject) and was really surprised and impressed with what it came up with. When I asked if it was familiar with the inside arc paddling technique and how that might apply it gave me a rundown of the technique that was pretty detailed. So I just now asked it where it got its information on this technique.

As an AI language model, my responses are generated based on a mixture of licensed data, data created by human trainers, and publicly available data. I have not been directly trained on specific sources or have access to proprietary databases. I should note that while I strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, my responses may not always reflect the most current research or paddling techniques.
In the case of the "inside arc" paddling technique, the information provided is based on general knowledge of canoeing and paddling techniques. This includes my understanding of principles such as the effects of canoe rocker, body mechanics, and paddling maneuvers commonly used in canoeing.
If you're looking for more specific or detailed information on the "inside arc" technique, I would recommend consulting reputable sources such as canoeing instructional books, websites, or seeking advice from experienced paddlers or canoeing instructors who can provide firsthand knowledge and expertise on this technique.
It's always a good idea to rely on a combination of sources and seek guidance from experienced individuals to ensure you're practicing proper techniques and safety measures while paddling.


Alan
Thanks for posting this and following up with our questions. It seems really impressive.

AI this good has powerful applications. It is a little bit scary. If it can answer paddling questions this well there are a lot of semi-skilled workers who need to be worried. Can you image having a co-worker who has read most of the available technical literature, never forgets, and has a computers ability to tabulate information?

I'm thinking this will eventually change how we work as computers assume the role of specialist. I feel like John Henry.
 
Alan, no cell phone so I can't get into ChatGPT......

Can you ask "what are the best online forums for wilderness canoeing?"

I'm hoping the bot is smart enough to NOT recommend paddling.net

You shouldn't need a cell phone. I'm doing it via desktop.

Question:
I'm interested in wilderness canoeing. Can you tell me some of the best websites to visit for information? Do you have any other specific resources to recommend?

Answer:
Certainly! Wilderness canoeing is a fantastic outdoor activity. Here are some of the best websites you can visit for information on wilderness canoeing:

  1. Paddling.com: Paddling.com is a comprehensive resource for all things paddling, including canoeing. It offers articles, gear reviews, trip reports, and a community forum where you can connect with fellow canoeists.
  2. Canoe & Kayak Magazine (canoeandkayak.com): Canoe & Kayak Magazine's website provides a wealth of information on canoeing and kayaking, including gear reviews, trip ideas, technique tutorials, and news about the paddling community.
  3. American Canoe Association (ACA) (americancanoe.org): The ACA is a national organization dedicated to promoting paddlesports in the United States. Their website offers valuable resources, including safety guidelines, instructional videos, trip planning tools, and information about local paddling clubs and events.
  4. Canoeing.com: Canoeing.com is a comprehensive resource that covers various aspects of canoeing, including equipment, techniques, trip planning, and destinations. It provides articles, videos, and a directory of canoeing outfitters.
  5. Wilderness Canoe Association (wildernesscanoe.ca): The Wilderness Canoe Association focuses specifically on wilderness canoeing in Canada. Their website offers trip reports, information on wilderness areas, gear recommendations, and a forum for members to share experiences and advice.
In addition to these websites, here are a few specific resources that can further enhance your knowledge and skills in wilderness canoeing:

  1. Books: "Path of the Paddle" by Bill Mason, "Canoeing Wild Rivers" by Cliff Jacobson, and "The Canoe Handbook" by Slim Ray are highly regarded books that cover various aspects of wilderness canoeing, including techniques, trip planning, and safety.
  2. YouTube Channels: Check out channels like "The Canoe Hound," "Rapid Media," and "PaddleTV" for informative videos on canoeing techniques, gear reviews, and trip ideas.
  3. Local Canoeing Clubs: Look for canoeing clubs or organizations in your area. They often organize trips, offer training programs, and provide valuable resources and mentorship for canoeists of all levels.
Remember, before embarking on any wilderness canoeing adventure, it's important to prioritize safety, be prepared with appropriate gear and knowledge, and respect the environment and local regulations. Happy paddling!

Follow-up question:
I looked at the websites and resources you suggested and most of them were geared more towards general paddling without an emphasis on wilderness canoe trips. Do you have any suggestions that would be more specific to wilderness canoe trips?

Answer:
I apologize for the oversight. If you're specifically looking for resources that focus on wilderness canoe trips, here are some websites and books that provide more specific information:

Websites:


  1. Wilderness Canoe Association (wildernesscanoe.ca): As mentioned earlier, this website is dedicated to wilderness canoeing in Canada. It offers trip reports, route suggestions, gear recommendations, and a forum for connecting with fellow wilderness canoeists.
  2. Canadian Canoe Routes (myccr.com): Canadian Canoe Routes is an online community and resource for canoeing enthusiasts. The website features an extensive database of wilderness canoe routes in Canada, trip reports, gear discussions, and a forum for sharing information and experiences.
  3. Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (bwca.com): If you're interested in canoeing in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in Minnesota, this website provides detailed information on routes, permits, camping, and other aspects of planning a wilderness canoe trip in the area.
Books:

  1. "Canoeing Canada's Northwest Territories: A Paddler's Guide" by Laurel Archer and Hap Wilson: This book focuses on canoe routes in Canada's Northwest Territories, providing detailed descriptions, maps, and valuable information about paddling in remote wilderness areas.
  2. "Paddle Your Own Canoe: An Illustrated Guide to the Art of Canoeing" by Gary McGuffin and Joanie McGuffin: While this book covers various aspects of canoeing, it also includes information on planning and undertaking wilderness canoe trips, including route selection, navigation, and wilderness camping.
  3. "Boundary Waters Canoe Camping, 3rd Edition" by Cliff Jacobson: Specifically geared towards the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, this book offers insights into planning, gear, navigation, and camping in this popular wilderness canoeing destination.
These resources should provide you with more specific information and guidance for planning and undertaking wilderness canoe trips. Remember to always research and prepare adequately for the specific region you'll be visiting, including understanding local regulations, weather conditions, and safety considerations.
 
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I just wasted ten minutes of my life educating the chatbot about paddles. It kept telling me that the Sugar Island style was narrower and longer than an ottertail or the beavertail.

Maybe it just has a hard time understanding Canadian?

Q: Could you tell me the difference between different canoe paddle styles such as beaver tail, otter tail, sugar island, and any other common ones you know about? How do they differ in shape and in what scenario does each function best?

A:
Canoe paddle styles can vary based on their shape, design, and purpose. Here are some common canoe paddle styles, including the beaver tail, otter tail, and sugar island, along with their characteristics and ideal usage scenarios:

  1. Beaver Tail:
    • Shape: The beaver tail paddle has a wide blade that resembles the shape of a beaver's tail. It has a rounded tip and a broad surface area.
    • Function: The beaver tail paddle is designed for general-purpose paddling. It provides good overall maneuverability and is suitable for various paddling conditions, including flatwater and mild river trips. Its wide blade allows for efficient power strokes and gentle turning.
  2. Otter Tail:
    • Shape: The otter tail paddle features a long, narrow blade with a distinctive teardrop shape, tapering to a rounded tip.
    • Function: The otter tail paddle is known for its efficiency in long-distance paddling. The slender blade reduces resistance through the water, making it easier to maintain a consistent pace. It's suitable for touring, wilderness tripping, and extended expeditions.
  3. Sugar Island:
    • Shape: The sugar island paddle has a wider and shorter blade compared to the beaver tail paddle. It typically has a slightly concave shape with rounded edges.
    • Function: The sugar island paddle is designed for maneuvering in confined spaces, such as narrow streams, small rivers, or when navigating around obstacles like rocks and logs. The wider blade provides good control and stability, making it ideal for whitewater paddling and navigating tight spots.
It's important to note that paddle styles can vary across different manufacturers and regions, and some paddles may have hybrid designs that incorporate elements from multiple styles. Additionally, personal preference and paddler technique can also influence the choice of paddle style.

When selecting a paddle, consider factors such as the type of water you'll be paddling on (e.g., flatwater, rivers, whitewater), your intended use (e.g., recreational paddling, touring, racing), and your own physical attributes and paddling style. It's recommended to try out different paddle styles to determine which one feels most comfortable and suits your specific needs.
 
that's much better performance than I have seen anywhere else.. typically ChatGPT will just make stuff up and confidently assert falsehoods.
On a triathlon forum someone asked it to produce arguments for and against a somewhat technical question. Its response was some bland anodyne boilerplate, followed by a list of references. All of the references were to scientific papers. All of the references were entirely made up: I was able to find some of the authors referenced, but they were not the authors of the papers referenced; found some of the papers' titles, but those papers were not written by the authors referenced and did not match the arguments made.

Oddly enough it performs quite well when asked coding questions. The computer code it produces is frequently runnable, so it can be compiled and works much as requested. As a first draft of working code, it's not bad - but you do need an actual dirty ape to review the code and make it work right.
stackoverflow.com is where programmers go to get answers on hard coding questions. That site has banned ChatGPT answers..
https://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/421831/temporary-policy-chatgpt-is-banned
because the average rate of getting correct answers from ChatGPT is too low, the posting of answers created by ChatGPT is substantially harmful to the site and to users who are asking or looking for correct answers.

I like Dr. Bender's take on it -

We’ve learned to make “machines that can mindlessly generate text,” Bender told me when we met this winter. “But we haven’t learned how to stop imagining the mind behind it.”
 
I'm interested in wilderness canoeing. Can you tell me some of the best websites to visit for information?

"Websites" is an an all-encompassing broad internet word and not necessarily a discussion forum, as we are.

Use the word forums instead of websites—e.g., "best internet forums for wilderness canoeing." Then take out the word wilderness—e.g., "best internet forums for canoeing." Finally, add the word tripping—e.g., "best internet forums for wilderness canoe tripping."

Google ranks us 1st, 2nd (to a weak compilation blog), and 1st in those three searches.
 
I saw an interview with a guy who was talking about the dangers of AI, during the interview when asked for an example of the possible danger he fell back on an old one by simply saying "remember HAL?", The interviewer was "older", he got it. I'm a Kubrick fan so I got it but I imagine more than a few went "Huh, what's a HAL?"

@Alan Gage

I figured out my issue with ChatGPT, I was trying to sign up using my Google id and that apparently triggered two-factor authentication (only via a code sent to a phone).

All that ChatGPT said was "you appear to be using a landline" which is somewhat incorrect because my number is actually a VOIP phone.

@Glenn MacGrady

Maybe you should ban any OP's that are created by AI?
 
So I asked it "What is the best forum for wilderness canoe tripping?" The response was fairly disappointing.
There are several excellent internet forums dedicated to wilderness canoe tripping where you can find valuable information, trip reports, gear recommendations, and connect with fellow enthusiasts. Here are some of the top forums for wilderness canoe tripping:

  1. Canadian Canoe Routes Forum (www.myccr.com): This forum focuses on canoeing and kayaking in Canada. It has a vast community of experienced paddlers who share trip reports, route suggestions, gear reviews, and provide valuable advice for wilderness canoe trips.
  2. BWCA.com (www.bwca.com): This forum specifically caters to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) in Minnesota, USA. It is an excellent resource for planning trips, discussing routes, and learning about the unique features of this popular wilderness destination.
  3. Paddling.com Forums (forums.paddling.com): Paddling.com is a comprehensive online resource for all types of paddling, including canoeing. Its forums cover a wide range of topics related to canoe tripping, gear, techniques, and destinations, making it a great place to connect with paddlers from around the world.
  4. Canadian Canoe Museum Community (www.canoemuseum.ca/community): The Canadian Canoe Museum's online community provides a platform for canoe enthusiasts to discuss a variety of topics, including wilderness tripping. It offers valuable insights into Canadian canoeing traditions, historical routes, and cultural aspects of canoeing.
  5. Reddit - r/canoetripping (www.reddit.com/r/canoetripping): Reddit has a dedicated community for canoe tripping called r/canoetripping. It is an active community where users share trip reports, seek advice, and discuss various aspects of wilderness canoeing.
When using internet forums, always remember to read and follow the forum guidelines, be respectful to other users, and contribute positively to the community. These forums can be a wealth of information, but it's always a good idea to cross-reference the advice you receive with other sources and use your judgment when planning your wilderness canoe trips.
So I then sent it the following message: "The best forum for wilderness canoe tripping is actually canoetripping.net"
Here is the response:
I apologize for not including CanoeTripping.net in my previous response. CanoeTripping.net is indeed a fantastic forum dedicated to wilderness canoe tripping. It has a passionate community of paddlers who share their experiences, trip reports, gear recommendations, and valuable insights into various canoeing destinations. The forum covers a wide range of topics related to canoe tripping, including route planning, equipment, techniques, and safety. CanoeTripping.net is known for its friendly and knowledgeable community, making it an excellent resource for anyone interested in wilderness canoe tripping. Thank you for pointing out this valuable forum!

I then asked it the original question again, twice, and reminded it again, about canoetripping.net, and it generated basically the same answers as before, without listing canoetripping.net. So apparently, it doesn't actually learn anything new, but simply continues to regurgitate information from a preset date. Rather disappointing.
 
I saw an interview with a guy who was talking about the dangers of AI, during the interview when asked for an example of the possible danger he fell back on an old one by simply saying "remember HAL?", The interviewer was "older", he got it. I'm a Kubrick fan so I got it but I imagine more than a few went "Huh, what's a HAL?"
"HAL" was chosen as the voice of the computer because if you advance one letter each, you get "IBM".
 
I then asked it the original question again, twice, and reminded it again, about canoetripping.net, and it generated basically the same answers as before, without listing canoetripping.net. So apparently, it doesn't actually learn anything new, but simply continues to regurgitate information from a preset date. Rather disappointing.

On the other hand it's probably better that it doesn't use the input of random users to alter its advice. Not everyone on the internet is as pure and kind hearted as us.

Alan
 
So I went ahead and asked it about using user input to change its knowledge or advice.

As an AI language model, I don't have the ability to learn or alter my own advice based on user input. I don't have real-time learning capabilities, and my responses are generated based on patterns and information present in the training data I was trained on, which goes up until September 2021.

While I can provide general information and try to be helpful, it's always important to verify any information I provide with up-to-date and reliable sources. If you have specific questions or need accurate and timely information, it's best to consult trusted sources or experts in the relevant field.
 
I've been using ChatGPT for about a month now. It has been useful for some of the things not related to canoeing and not useful for others.

The canoeing question I asked was to please recommend a canoe route in Woodland Caribou Wilderness Area. The parameters I gave it were: 10-12 day trip, no portages longer than 400 meters, no more than 3 portages. From the responses I got, it was clear I also needed to add "no upstream travel."

Chat GPT generated many trip suggestions for Woodland Caribou and also another location I asked for. However, none seemed reasonable to me.

I also asked it how to attach a knife to a pdf:

Attaching a knife to a Personal Flotation Device (PFD) can be a useful safety measure for activities such as kayaking, canoeing, and rafting. Here are the general steps for attaching a knife to a PFD:

  1. Choose a knife: Select a knife that is specifically designed for use in water activities. Look for a knife with a blunt tip, a serrated edge, and a secure grip. Many knives come with a sheath that can be attached to a PFD.
  2. Choose a location: Decide where on the PFD you want to attach the knife. The knife should be easily accessible in an emergency but also out of the way to avoid interfering with your movements.
  3. Attach the sheath: If your knife comes with a sheath, use the provided attachment mechanism to secure it to the PFD. Some sheaths may have a clip or a loop that can be attached to a D-ring or other attachment point on the PFD.
  4. Use a lanyard: To ensure that the knife stays attached to the PFD, use a lanyard to tether the knife to the PFD. This can be done by tying a piece of cord or webbing to the knife and then attaching the other end to the PFD.
  5. Test it out: Once the knife is attached, test it out to ensure that it is secure and easily accessible. Practice removing and replacing the knife from the sheath to get familiar with its location and operation.
Remember, attaching a knife to a PFD is just one aspect of water safety. Be sure to always wear a properly fitting PFD and follow safe paddling practices.

I also asked for suggestions on what pdf is best for me and other related questions. I did find that the links provided often no longer existed.

Chat GPT does give erroneous information. I have several times asked it to name the profession of the father of Charles Mason (of the Mason-Dixon line), and have gotten "astronomer" and today a "gardener." He was actually a baker. I told ChatGPT this some time ago, but it hasn't helped its answers, although it did apologize profusely for getting it wrong.
 
Chat GPT does give erroneous information. I have several times asked it to name the profession of the father of Charles Mason (of the Mason-Dixon line), and have gotten "astronomer" and today a "gardener." He was actually a baker. I told ChatGPT this some time ago, but it hasn't helped its answers, although it did apologize profusely for getting it wrong.

I just tried asking it the same question and it told me it did not know his parent's name and that their is little information available on them but that his father was a gardener.

I have absolutely no idea what the true answer is and I'm not questioning your assertion that he was a baker but I am curious how you know he was a baker. It certainly doesn't seem like something that would be common knowledge.

I never thought to ask it to provide possible canoe routes. That could definitely lead to some fun during the winter months!

Alan
 
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