Repairing a Duluth Pack

Joined
Jun 12, 2012
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3,670
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Appleton, Maine
I learned about the Speedy Stitcher Sewing Awl on Youtube, I was looking for something to repair some seams on my canvas wall tent and also my Duluth "Day" Pack.
Finding one locally was tough, but I found I could order one from Walmart.com and have it shipped to my local Walmart. With the help of the Youtube tutorials I was able to figure out how this works and repair my Day pack first.

Here is the worn out area of my day pack. You can see that the pack was repaired at one time above the rip with new canvas, done by the folks at Duluth Pack. (sorry about the blurry picture, too late to go back and take a better one) On my first attempt to fix the tear, I used #10 canvas scraps from canoe canvasing. I tried to just fold the canvas over and sew, but I soon learned that the canvas fold needed to be ironed with heavy steam to give me a fold that stayed in place. Again, a poor picture, but it shows the fold in the canvas I was using to make the repair.

My sewing leaves a little to be desired, but here I'm making progress.


The finished pack.

I use this pack as a food bag now on canoe trips. I use two Sealine waterproof bags inside filled with my food and cooking supplies, a water bottle, cooking oil and some hooch up front. Like most Duluth Packs, they are not great back packs, but are tough and this one has served me for a long time in just about all my outdoor pursuits.
 
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Guest

Guest
Nice job! I've been using Mr. Speedy Stitcher for decades, and I still have trouble getting the overlap of each stitch in the middle of the work. It seems it always wants to peek out, and usually on the visible side.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2011
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Raymond, ME
Thanks for sharing.. I wish I had been smart enough to find out about Speedy Stitcher some years ago when mice took the bottom out of my old Duluth Pack. I have currently one of Jane Barron's Alder Stream packs that, if anything happened to, I would be upset about.. But now I know where to look to get something to fix it.
 
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Jul 25, 2012
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I've never used one of those "Speedy Stitchers", watching you I'm tempted to try it. Do you just eyeball the interval of the stitch or do you have some device to mark it off? When I need to patch a pair of work pants, to get the patch edges turned under and stay in place for sewing I use a running stitch (think of a snake crawling in and out of a picket fence) for thread I use some color that stands out against the pant material so when the repair is done I can find the thread and pull it out.
That looks like a good job, ready for many more trips! I think I'd rather have a properly repaired piece of gear than a new one.

Best Wishes, Rob
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2013
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Long island, ny
I love that stitcher!

That's some good work on the pack.

I have used it a number of times. I use 20# Dacron ice fishing line in black for most repairs as it blends on dark colors better. I used it to attach webbing to the bottom of my REI trail seat. Now the seat doubles as my canoe chair or a stadium chair too.

A suggestion on the wall tent that may come as common sense to most but it didn't to me...

Set up the tent and pin on the patch material, then take it down and sew it..

I tried to sew my pop up ice shanty while it was still up and kept starting the stitch and then lifted up the shanty and put the tag through the loop! Not thinking I guess. I was complaining about the process one day and someone else says 'duh' take it down and sew it!

Anyways good luck on the wall tent.

Oldy Moldy, I just eyeball it... makes for a more 'I did it repair'. Not from the factory look.
 
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Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
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Appleton, Maine
I've never used one of those "Speedy Stitchers", watching you I'm tempted to try it. Do you just eyeball the interval of the stitch or do you have some device to mark it off?

Best Wishes, Rob

I just tried to stay off the edge and move the stitich down the line by eye, and not stab my finger. Rather than push the needle thru the heavy canvas of the pack, I rotated the needle back and forth and pushed, almost like drilling a hole, it seemed alot safer as that needle sure is sharp.
 
Joined
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I love that stitcher!

That's some good work on the pack.



A suggestion on the wall tent that may come as common sense to most but it didn't to me...

Set up the tent and pin on the patch material, then take it down and sew it..

Shortly after my wife goes to work tomorrow I will set the tent up in the living room and go to work. Too cold anywhere else to work on it...what she don't know....;)
 
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Robin, I'm curious; the rest of the pack doesn't look too bad, what is wearing out the fabric in that same place? As far as stabbing myself with a needle on the far side, I use a cork from a champagne bottle to back up the fabric I'm piercing. Also the material is more likely to remain flat and makes for a neater patch.
Your speedy stitcher comes with a nice handle, but when I'm using a needle alone I try to have a pair of smooth grip pliers, that way the needle remains smooth, doesn't chew up the fabric and is easier to push.

Now I don't know about this but: if you do stick yourself it might be best to wait for the blood to stop, it looks ugly to have it on the finished work and I've always wondered if the blood might encourage those little chewers.

Best Wishes, Rob
 
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Guest

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I really like the looks of that sewing tool Robin. I used to hand sew repairs to my pants. My wife has guided me through machine sewing, but the machine broke down, and all we have left is my Grandma's very old Singer. I'm not allowed to touch it.
My method of hand sewing was called "poke and pray". Poke the needle through and pray you don't draw blood. I like Oldie's idea of a cork thimble. Can I call you Champagne Rob from now on? Thanks guys for these ideas.
 
Joined
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Robin, I'm curious; the rest of the pack doesn't look too bad, what is wearing out the fabric in that same place? As far as stabbing myself with a needle on the far side, I use a cork from a champagne bottle to back up the fabric I'm piercing.



Best Wishes, Rob

Hi OM,
The place where it split is original material, the darker green is where the folks at Duluth Pack restored the pack years ago. I guess it just gave way from use and old age, the only option to prevent this would have been to retire the pack rather than restore in the first place. BTW, Duluth gave me that option, they offered me credit towards a new one, but I opted for the repairs. I should have started the repair when the split first appeared but I waited and it gave way on my last trip.

As far as cork goes, good idea, but the Champagne and Wine I drink comes with plastic caps...
 
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Guest

Guest
I just tracked this down in my favourite outdoors store! This looks to be a great product, especially for emergency repairs, and the short youtube video is also very helpful. Thanks Robin.
 
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