• Happy Birthday, Bill Mason (1929-1988)! 🎨📽️🛶

Canoe Art: Paintings, Sketches, Sculpture, Architecture

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Not sure this qualifies as art but the dark winter bark background has been scraped away to show Mishepizzou, the benevolent or malevolent Ojibway spirit god of Lake Superior that is depicted at Agawa Rock on Lake Superior. It's been kind and meaningful to me, so at the time on the canoe it went. I suggested that the Hodag mascot in Rhinelander, Wis. was derived from Mishepizzou but locals took great umbrage at this and so my opinion was fiercely rejected, but search and compare for yourself. The other difficult to see arc designs are the moons representing the months it took to build the canoe, (Strawberry, Flower, Harvest, etc.) The pictographs on the rock wall behind the canoe are at Fairy Point, Missinaibi Lake. The canoe and pictographs are both illustrated by Tappan Adney, so have something in common. The canoe is based on Adney's Tete de Boule 2 fathom Hunter canoe. Not sure this pic will work but here goes... (wife gets photo credit)
 
Shane V, welcome to site membership! Feel free to ask any questions and to post messages, photos and videos, and to start threads, in our many forums. Please read Welcome to CanoeTripping and Site Rules! Also, please add your location to your profile, which will cause it to show under your avatar, as this is a geographic sport. Many of the site's technical features are explained in Features: Help and How-To Running Thread. We look forward to your participation in our canoe community.

The canoe is based on Adney's Tete de Boule 2 fathom Hunter canoe.

Did you build this canoe yourself? If so, how long did it take you?
 
Here's my take: a loving "self-portrait"of our old Grumman-the image on left is a photo of its bottom, a landscape of memory via rock, sand and stone. Image on right, my take on it in oil.
 

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Shane V, welcome to site membership! Feel free to ask any questions and to post messages, photos and videos, and to start threads, in our many forums. Please read Welcome to CanoeTripping and Site Rules! Also, please add your location to your profile, which will cause it to show under your avatar, as this is a geographic sport. Many of the site's technical features are explained in Features: Help and How-To Running Thread. We look forward to your participation in our canoe community.



Did you build this canoe yourself? If so, how long did it take you?I t
Thank you. Not sure how to change profile. I read through "help" but don't see an upper right icon except for the person silhouette but I think that is outside this website? the google icon upper right corner shows I'm a guest and not "synchronized" with other devices. Probably obvious to everyone else.

No way did I build this on my own. First attempts were a disaster. One did make it as decor in a bar but definitely not seaworthy. I've got to credit Ferdy Goode and David Gidmark and all the knowledge and help they passed on to me. This would have been a totally different canoe. I was fortunate to be in the right place and time in what shockingly is now a long time ago. They themselves are in that long long cultural procession way way ahead of me. The folks who recorded Jocko Carle and Basil Smith, the documentation by Henri Vallaincourt, and books by so many others like James Dina. And I suppose my b*st*rd brother Dave who brought back John McPhees' book from his AT hike out east.
 
Not sure how to change profile.

Members often talk about things local to them such as the weather, paddling opportunities, wildfires, animals, etc., which doesn't mean much unless we know where that member is.

Underneath the site logo header on the upper right is your avatar (which currently is just a circle with an S in it) and name. Click on it, which opens up Your Account. Click Account Details, which opens up a page with several information fields. Fill in the Location field, and any of the other fields you would like to share. Once you fill in the Location field in your account, your location will show up under your avatar in each of your posts. The location is clickable—i.e., other folks can click on it, which will open up Google Maps.

the google icon upper right corner shows I'm a guest

I don't know what icon you're referring to or what you mean. You are a full member here and not a guest. A guest is someone who hasn't registered.

I've got to credit . . . .

That's a long line of top flight mentors. Congratulations. There are many fans and addicts of wooden canoes here, and I'm a director of the WCHA. I'm sure folks would like to see and hear more about your canoe(s) and where you've traveled with them.
 
My wife and I went to the Farnsworth Museum in Rockland last weekend to see some Andrew Wyeth water colors before they went on to Japan and in one of the rooms I found this.

The information and pictures at the link below might interest you. N. C. Wyeth, purchased a very old bark canoe and brought it to his studio in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. There is a link to a video which shows it at the Brandywine Museum of Art. It is similar to one that is currently on display at the Maine Maritime Museum.

Benson


 
Here's a pic of metal canoe sculpture in Penetanguishene, Ontario. Apparently there's a legend of a local tinsmith, Toussaint Boucher, making a canoe out of metal in mid-1800s.


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Photo on left is a “life journal” of our old Grumman. The black & white images are prints I made honoring journeys made. A diary of water and wear.
 

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Glenn, I have that print "The Howl of the Weather" and can see it hanging on my wall right now. I like it so very much because it reminds me of large lake white knuckle crossings I have done, most especially Lake Laberge on the Yukon one time when we experienced three complete changes of (mostly bad) weather during the several hours it took to paddle from beginning to end.
 
A local youth organization called Trekkers is having a fundraiser. They had a bunch of 3’ paddles made and anyone wanting to participate would get a paddle and do what they thought would fit the theme of ‘journeys’ to the paddle. My wife decided to not use oils (her usual art medium) but instead did some woodburning. It was her first try at wood burning, but I don’t think it will be her last. When she was finished I varnished it all up.
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All will be hung in a local gallery in May and will be auctioned off to raise money. A worthy cause we are happy to participate in.
Jim
 
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