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What are you reading?

Black-Fly,

A couple of months ago I tried reading Finnegans Wake, the classic work by James Joyce. But I wasn’t up to it. The book is unique, I think, in the literal sense of the word. I once heard it said that it’s the most famous book never read completely by anyone. Have you considered or encountered this book, that took Joyce 19 years to write? It’s not new, but maybe new to you. It could be fiction, I think. Or perhaps just an intellectual challenge.
 
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Black-Fly,

A couple of months ago I tried reading Finnegans Wake, the classic work by James Joyce. But I wasn’t up to it. The book is unique, I think, in the literal sense of the word. I once heard it said that it’s the most famous book never read completely by anyone. Have you considered or encountered this book, that took Joyce 19 years to write? It’s not new, but maybe new to you. It could be fiction, I think. Or perhaps just an intellectual challenge.
I fall asleep too easily for Joyce. I’ve got several books on my reader that I can’t get through a page. Some great stuff too. My brain is just not up to it anymore.
 
A decent fictional book I enjoyed was "The Corps" by W.E.B. Griffin. It's a 10 book series about the Untied States Marine Corps before and during the years of world war 2 and the Korean War.
 
I just finished “The Boys in the Boat” on Audible. While not about canoeing, per se, it was a gripping true story. It may very well be on one of the other reading lists. First published in 2013 and a long time best seller. Entertaining and inspirational. Highly recommended. (It is about sculling- pretty close to canoeing!)
 
I'm going to merge the 12 posts in this thread into the long-running What are you reading? thread because it's duplicative.
 
I broke a self-imposed exile from the used book stores. After all, the gentleman who runs my favourite small town book store is retiring this year. It took no effort to convince my wife to stop in to this gem in "the prettiest small town in Ontario". So says the tourist brochures. They do have a point, but gems can be lost more easily than found. I will support most any mom & pop small business. It's unfortunate none in his family are willing to take on the monumental task of keeping this store going. But he's earned his days in the sun. I was hoping to catch him behind the till to offer my thanks and best wishes, but that will have to wait till another visit.
My wife and I both came away clutching bundles of books. She is well away into her reading, as am I. I'm escaping nightly to County Down Northern Ireland following An Irish Country Doctor by Patrick Taylor. Although set in the 60's just outside Belfast during the Troubles the story sees the broad strokes of life amidst the changes sweeping society in that part of the world.
I've also developed an appreciation for my own GP. lol
 
Thanks to those who responded. Finding old posts can be difficult, but I did find some gems and downloaded them. Reading isn’t as easy as it once was, and a good story helps me stay in the game. I used to read non-fiction, but it’s difficult now. I have several good books started which likely will never be finished.
 
Thanks to those who responded. Finding old posts can be difficult, but I did find some gems and downloaded them. Reading isn’t as easy as it once was, and a good story helps me stay in the game. I used to read non-fiction, but it’s difficult now. I have several good books started which likely will never be finished.
Have you tried audio books available at many libraries. They are great on road trips.
 
I'm about a quarter of the way through Don Quixote, and about ready to give up. Yes, it's funny that he's so delusional, but it just keep going and going... and going...
 
Have you tried audio books available at many libraries. They are great on road trips.

I do audio books almost exclusively now. A couple years ago I fell out of the habit of reading in the morning and at bed time and couldn't get back into it. I bristled at the thought of an Audible account but I finally bit the bullet and it's been great. I have a 20 minute commute to work so I usually listen then. I'll often listen during lunch breaks and on of course on road trips as well.

I've been disappointed in some of the narrators but for the most part they've been very good. Some have done a much better job than I could have done reading it myself and made the book that much better.

Alan
 
I'm about a quarter of the way through Don Quixote, and about ready to give up. Yes, it's funny that he's so delusional, but it just keep going and going... and going...

I can't argue. I listened to the audio book about a year ago. I kept waiting for the book to turn a corner and give me something interesting rather than entertaining but it seemed like a pretty similar routine throughout.

Viewed in an historical light I'm sure it's a very important and revolutionary book and you could even draw corollaries between Don Quixote being drawn in and taken by reading those heroic and gallant knight tales and how people today view, believe, and try to emulate their favorite social media influencers.

But even with that said I did not find it very interesting.

Alan
 
I got about 20% through “Killers of the Flower Moon.” I find Huck Finn to be boring nowadays, but it was great 50 years ago. I may get back to these, but no hurry. Next up: Anna Karenina.
 
Gullies of My People by John Lane, author of Chattooga: Descending into the Myth of Deliverance River. I'll encourage everyone to read him as not only is he a very good writer but also a good fella.
 
Frank Richards guidebook " The Upper West Branch of the Penobscot River"
Very nice details on a very approachable multi dsy to a week canoe trip
 
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