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Recommend a coffee maker? I'm done bearing a heavy thermos

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Guys, could you please by any chance recommend a coffee maker? I'm done bearing a heavy thermos, so I just want to have a small maker and make coffee on the place.
Yet, I've found this review, dunno if any of those are reliable. Any suggestions?
 
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SarahSimm: I am moving your post from the "Winter Camping" topic, and starting it here in a new thread under the "Camp Kitchen" topic. The thread in "Winter Camping," in which you posted your question, concerns hot tent heaters. I would rather not jumble that thread up.

Some topics, like camp coffee, have been discussed in depth here in past threads. It is perfectly fine to start a new thread, but it may be more effective, and you may get more focused responses, if you use the search function and refine your inquiry or refer to past suggestions and threads on the topic.
 
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We have a Jet Boil stove and they sell an accessory French press plunger thing with its own top. Very light weight and we carried the stove anyway. The plunger is only a few ounces.
We haven’t use it in years because we both quit coffee but as I recall it did a good job, but as everyone knows anything in the woods tastes better anyway.

Jim
 
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Ditto on Boatman53's recommendation.....I was gifted a jetboil years ago right after they came out.....very convenient for heating water (about all it's good for). you can nest a small iso-pro fuel canister inside of it so it packs down to the size of a water bottle......Those fuel canisters are finicky in the cold so you might have to stuff it in your coat to warm it up before attaching to the burner...

Mike
 
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So I will start with the fact that I'm a coffee snob. I have a commercial grade espresso machine in my house and roast my own beans.

I have tried lots of coffee makers in the backcountry and pretty much given up on carrying the weight. There are a lot of high end coffee roasters who have recently come out with very good instant options. More than good enough for me out there and 1 less thing to carry.

They are not even close to cheap but I find I get 2 coffees out of 1 packet.

A couple of options in Canada

https://www.pilotcoffeeroasters.com/coffee/instant/

https://49thcoffee.com/collections/instant-coffees
 
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I've used several methods to make coffee - boil in the water and strain, French Press and recently instant coffee. In recent times weight has become an issue so I have used instant coffee. I have found that a German imported instant tastes really good - Jacobs Kronung. It's not cheap but it lasts a long time, its easy to carry and easy to make. So I agree with ShawnD.
 
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Last Christmas our non-coffee drinking, gram weenie, backpacking son gave Karen and I an AeroPress, after we'd complained a bit about Folgers tea bag coffee. Said all his coffee snob friends used it. I was skeptical until we tried it. It makes great coffee! Light, compact, and easy to use.
 
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I love fancy coffee and have numerous contraptions. For simplicity, weight, and fast I’d suggest the Melitta pour over, plastic number 2 cone. Ubiquitous. Cheap. Plenty of ritual and tasty.
 
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I also have a number of methods to make coffee in the backcountry. I like the Bialetti Moka Express, I have a small Perk and a press, but the one that goes with me the most is a Kelley Kettle and a pot to make Cowboy coffee. I have larger versions of all the above for group camping.
Either way, I also carry a 16oz Hydro Flask. I like hot/strong coffee, and with the HF I can sip coffee as I break camp and still have some for first break while paddling.
 
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I purchased this press from GSI Outdoors. I've been using it regularly for about 3 years now. It makes about 16oz of coffee. I use it almost everyday. It's all plastic except the cloth sleeve. Usually ends up rolling around in the bottom of the canoe. This one's getting a bit worn out. I will replace it with another of the same.
 

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I use liquid coffee concentrate. just put a little in hot water and your done. no grounds or gadgets. way better then instant, and some say they can't tell it from brewed coffee. many restaurants and such use it in their coffee machines.
 
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I just use a little 4 cup perc, makes 2 mugs full, and all the fixings fit inside around the bail.
 
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Like a lot of folks here, I use a coffee press when weight isn't a concern. Mine is a simple one made of plexi-glass that I purchased years ago from Campmor. It came with its own neoprene cozy long before cozies where a thing. I've used it mostly when out winter camping and pulling my gear in a pulk. Mine is good for 32 oz. so makes two good mugs; or three smaller ones is you're sharing with friends. It's pretty much foolproof, unbreakable and easy enough that even I can use it with good results. Boil water, add it to the coffee grounds in the cylinder, pour it in, press the press and wait a few minutes. That's all there is to it.

That's all for now. Best of luck in finding a system that works for you and until next time....be well.

snapper
 
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I have tried a couple things. On bicycle tours I have often just done without unless there was some place to buy coffee. That often meant that I might not get my coffee until after I had 30 miles in and some days not at all.

In the backcountry I have used:
  • An old aluminum 4 cup percolator It was "borrowed" from one in our group's grandmother. I still have it these 50 years or so later. I am sure Gram Rodrick has been dead for decades so I guess it is officially mine now. It worked fine, but I have not used it in decades. I am not sure if I still have the "guts" for it so it may no longer be a percolator. FWIW, a SVEA 123 fits nicely with a piece of 1/2 foam pad wrapped around it.
  • The guts from a glass press that happened to fit a ti cup. Worked okay, but made less coffee than I wanted.
  • Starbucks Via instant - I am a Starbuck hater, but Via isn't bad.
  • Folgers instant -Tasted terrible, big mistake.
  • Abstinence from coffee - I was surprised that I managed okay without. I kind of did it as an experiment to see if I was physically addicted to caffeine of just loved my coffee. Turns out I am not physically addicted.
I like the sound of liquid coffee, sounds really easy to deal with. I don't mind cold coffee too much so when I didn't feel like firing up a stove or fire it would be nice. If you take sugar in your coffee, you could probably presweeten it.

The Snowpeak press looks nice, but kind of spendy. It holds 24 ounces and only weighs 6.3 ounces. https://www.rei.com/product/129640/snow-peak-titanium-french-press

I have considered taking a drip setup. I don't see any reason it wouldn't be fine, but I have not used one in camp.

As someone who likes, but doesn't absolutely need cream in my coffee I found that Nido is a good substitute. It isn't a match for half and half, but it is powdered whole milk and quite good. It keeps forever until you open the can and for a long time even after that. It does all of the sudden get clumpy and not dissolve at some point after having been opened. I think high humidity shortens the after opening shelf life, but it typically keeps WAY longer than any trip I am likely to go on. At home I have had a previously opened container last a year or more..
 
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I found liquid coffee in little plastic pods-just enough for 1 cup. Super lite and takes little space.
 
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I've used coffee presses made by GSI and other brands, some of which produced just OK tasting coffee. Most generate a mess that drives me to use SPUX Via. While Via is a good substitute, it's just not 100 percent. I eventually purchased an Aero Press, the original which is lighter than the "GO" version. I just use the plunger and the brewing chamber which is lighter still (likely <9 ounces). The coffee is fantastic and there's absolutely very little cleaning required. Just a quick wipe down of the inside of the chamber and plunger face after the compressed coffee "puck" is pushed out of the chamber. As far as I'm concerned, its my new No. 1 coffee maker. I do use a hand grinder which further improves the taste of the coffee.
 

Glenn MacGrady

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I suppose the preferred method of pressing, soaking, burbling, steeping or dissolving coffee grounds with hot water depends on how much of a coffee gourmet one fancies oneself. One man's coffee swill is apparently another woman's coffee champagne.

I drink decaf tea. But if I did drink coffee, I, as a non-gourmet, would choose the fastest, lowest volume and lightest weight method available. I suppose that would be a decent quality ground in steepable coffee bags or the liquid concentrate.
 
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