Is Canoe Trolling REALLY Trolling?

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I'm looking for a new rod, and I've been looking at these 2 piece trolling rods. However, most are designed for downriggers, and I'm wondering if motorboat trolling calls for the same things as canoe trolling. I figure a moderate or moderate-heavy power and a fast action would be best, maybe 8' long to provide adequate paddle clearance, 8-20 lb. line. What do you think?
 
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Been canoe trolling for over 50 years, never felt the need for any pole longer than 6.5', medium weight. I think the fact that you're most likely going slower than boat trolling and not using a down rigger or heavy weights makes a long trolling rod unnecessary. Just my opinion though.
 
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I just use a cheapie 6 ft rod and 6-8 lb line. I lay it against the rail with the tip up and hook my other leg over the butt of the rod. Gives me enough room to dip the paddle and I dont loose the rod on a snag that way. Hopefully.
It might be nice to have a rod holder though.
 
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I take an 8’ med heavy power, med action when up in the far North trolling for big Lakers. 20 plus lbs fish is very common and they are incredibly feisty and the quicker the fight and release, the better for their survival. The extra length makes the heavier weight rod a little less like a 2x4 and its nicer for casting than a shorter heavy powered rod.
IMO fast actions aren’t really desirable for pure trolling rods, the sensitivity isnt required and they can rip the lure out of the fishes mouth during hookup.
 
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Black Fly...

...maybe 8' long to provide adequate paddle clearance...

Tried longer rods and they are clunky and cumbersome in the limited space that a canoe provides... shorter 5 1/2- 6 foot rods are easier to handle while still providing enough clearance for paddling on the same side.

I also troll without a rod holder, the rod resting on the gunnel with the rod tip out over the water about 90 degrees to canoe axis... and the butt held secure more or less between the knees when kneeling or the ankles when sitting. The rod seems to stay in place even with a big one on and paddling out to deeper water to avoid snags when trolling the shoreline... the rod could be tied to a thwart if worried about it going over the side, never had to do this since I never came close to losing a rod. The biggest risk has been swamping a tippy canoe when all the attention is on the fish... but no dumps yet.
 
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Two rods - 1 6' 6" medium w 8 lb test and a 7' med light with 6' test for trolling all over the ADK's. Start with a spoon on the medium and a stickbait on the M/L and troll. Keep changing lures till you find the right combination. Often times Chick is on the bow facing stern while I paddle and watch the fish finder. Two clamps on the gunnels that she rests the rods against to keep them from sliding.
 
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HAH! I can troll with a 10 foot length of paracord with a buckle snap on the end. I caught a pike that way in Wabakimi when I absently let the half of the portage line drag in the water. Who needs a stinking pole and lures. Pike eat anything! The problem is I didn't know the line was trailing in the water till the fish hit it and I nearly went into Smoothrock Lake.
 
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Speed of a canoe is similar to reeling in the line. Any standard pole is fine.

I have a rod holder but find I use it less and less. Prefer to wrap my feet around the pole for a couple of reasons. First is I can feel what’s happening. Don’t have to rely on constantly looking at the rod tip. Also, the rod’s more accessible when you get a bite.
 
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