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Glue It, Or Not To Glue It? That is the question.

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In my day tripping boats I just toss it in place. Not really a problem. Once in a while it will slip if she has to take a long jump and it's wet underneath.

My tripping boats have tie downs attached the floor under the mat and I run a short length of bungee loop from those tie downs up through holes I cut in the corners of the bad and jam a stick through the loop. This lets me portage the canoe without the pad falling out.

Alan
 
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1 inch webbing tightly wrapped around the seat and screwed in place is the way I secure my seat pad. Tight enough that the seat pad slides underneath and stays put, even at 70 mph on the highway.

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I lay mine down with no glue. I roll it up and jam it under the seat or in the exterior straps of my pack for portages. I can use it around camp and as part of her bedding at the end of the day.

Barry
 
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when I had my dog, I used a blue foamy cut to fit snugly from gunwale to gunwale that could be taken out at night and doubled to serve as his bed.
 
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As per scoutergriz, another easy, no-glue option is to get a set of four of those "anti-fatique" gray foam puzzle mats that Harbor Freight sells. Two pads hooked together will be plenty wide enough to fill the inside curvature of any canoe hull from bottom of inwale to bottom of inwale. Trim carefully to fit and tuck the cut edges under the inwales and it will stay put and provide a large padded surface.
 
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As per scoutergriz, another easy, no-glue option is to get a set of four of those "anti-fatique" gray foam puzzle mats that Harbor Freight sells. Two pads hooked together will be plenty wide enough to fill the inside curvature of any canoe hull from bottom of inwale to bottom of inwale. Trim carefully to fit and tuck the cut edges under the inwales and it will stay put and provide a large padded surface.
I have some of those pads in my garage. I guess I could glue them together before trimming. Great idea. I'll get on it, worth a try.
 
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I’m looking for Ds to put in the bottom of the canoe. Anyone know a source for some lightweight, strong glue on Ds?
Unless you really need a steel D ring I would suggest going to anchor patches that have a sewn in fabric loop. They are lighter and do not rust or tarnish. I have used a fair number of such made by Northwater in Canada. Most I have purchased from Rutabaga. I have found relatively inexpensive steel D rings for sale on Amazon. Go there and enter "PVC raft D rings" in the search bar.
 
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I don’t think I want Ds. Too big for the job. Overkill. I’ll look at the Velcro stuff. The pad just needs to stay put when I carry the canoe, or the dog moves.
 
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Glenn MacGrady

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I like the hard plastic gray d-rings, which have a much smaller footprint than most round or square metal d-ring or fabric loop pads. They are available from Western Canoeing as part of the wilderness lashing kit . . .


. . . but they will sell the d-rings separately for about $1 each.
 
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I like the hard plastic gray d-rings, which have a much smaller footprint than most round or square metal d-ring or fabric loop pads. They are available from Western Canoeing as part of the wilderness lashing kit . . .


. . . but they will sell the d-rings separately for about $1 each.
Those hard plastic D ring anchors were sold by Voyageur years ago. When Voyageur went bust, Marlin Bayes of Western Canoe and Kayak bought the mold for the smaller D rings and sells them. Those hard plastic plates, especially for the larger 2" D rings, had a reputation for causing cracks in Royalex canoes where they were bonded to the hull bottom using the 2 part urethane 3M structural adhesive that was recommended. The cured adhesive and the plastic plate were much stiffer than the Royalex resulting in a stress riser along the edges of the plate.
 

Glenn MacGrady

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Those hard plastic D ring anchors were sold by Voyageur years ago. When Voyageur went bust, Marlin Bayes of Western Canoe and Kayak bought the mold for the smaller D rings and sells them. Those hard plastic plates, especially for the larger 2" D rings, had a reputation for causing cracks in Royalex canoes where they were bonded to the hull bottom using the 2 part urethane 3M structural adhesive that was recommended. The cured adhesive and the plastic plate were much stiffer than the Royalex resulting in a stress riser along the edges of the plate.
Not that it matters, but I heard that Voyageur/Mad River sourced them from Western Canoe. In any event, Western Canoe is currently the only source I'm aware of.

I can only report that I've only used the 1" d-rings and have never had any issue with them on Royalex or composite canoes. I honestly can't remember what kind of glue I used on any of them. Probably a cheap 5 minute epoxy or Vyna Bond (no longer available, I believe), as those were what I used for lots of canoe things more or less successfully.

I like fabric loop pads better than rings for thigh straps and some other uses.
 
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