DIY bags and cases

Joined
Jun 17, 2019
Messages
104
Reaction score
48
Location
Michigan
Curious to what has that many poles. Nice work on the bags. I keep thinking I should try may hand at making or modifiying gear.
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
90
Curious to what has that many poles. Nice work on the bags. I keep thinking I should try may hand at making or modifiying gear.

My sons' Cabelas Alaskan Guide tent requires 6 poles for the canopy and 1 pole for the vestibule. I replaced the original fiberglass poles with aluminum poles. I made a set of 8.5 mm aluminum poles and a set of 11 mm aluminum poles for it.


100_6928.JPG
 

Attachments

  • 100_6925.JPG
    100_6925.JPG
    195.5 KB · Views: 1
  • 100_6863.JPG
    100_6863.JPG
    196.2 KB · Views: 1
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
90
Thank you Patrick.

Modifying and making equipment is a hobby that I enjoy. For every project that turns out there are many more that don't.
 
Joined
Oct 29, 2019
Messages
364
Reaction score
363
Location
southeast PA
My Mom taught me to sew as a Tenderfoot Boy Scout. I had to iron my uniform shirt in military press style for our Scout troop, as well as hand sew on all my Scout patches with concealed stitching. From there I learned to sew everything from repairing clothing, hemming pants, turning shirt collars, etc to making outdoor gear. For years, I made Frostline kit down mittens, down vests & jackets, bike handlebar bags and ultimately the -20 down mummy sleeping bag which I still use in winter. Lots of people in my life received completed Frostline Kits for Christmas and birthday gifts!
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
90
Thanks to all for the kind words. Patrick, I too was a Boy Scout and taught to sew by my Mom.

I ran across some photos of old sewing projects and thought that by posting some I may spark an interest in others. Most of my sewing projects are simple storage bags like this one.
 

Attachments

  • 118_8520.JPG
    118_8520.JPG
    82.7 KB · Views: 6
  • 118_8517.JPG
    118_8517.JPG
    83.3 KB · Views: 5
  • 118_8516.JPG
    118_8516.JPG
    92.1 KB · Views: 5
  • 118_8515.JPG
    118_8515.JPG
    93.3 KB · Views: 5
  • 118_8513.JPG
    118_8513.JPG
    101.9 KB · Views: 5
  • 118_8512.JPG
    118_8512.JPG
    102.6 KB · Views: 5
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 22, 2019
Messages
403
Reaction score
158
Location
Pinnacle, North Carolina
Johnny, I have a pair of industrial machines, a Consew 226R flatbed with reverse and a Consew 227 cylinder bed machine (no reverse :() and am still learning to sew well. I'm working my way through the different styles of bags, zippers etc to get a feel for making the patterns and then the bags. I'm also part way done with a canoe style pack made from 18 oz canvas and loosely based on the Duluth #4 Traditional pack but with a modern adjustable height shoulder harness from ALPS Mountaineering.

The two saw cases look like they may have some padding in them. If so, what are you using? About the only thing I have on hand that's bonded to padding is spacer mesh such as you see on the contact side of pack shoulder straps and waist belts.

Where do you live? I'm a half hour north of Winston-Salem, North Carolina.


Lance
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
90
Hi Lance

Other than when my Mom showed me how to use her sewing machine as a youth I am self taught. I learned mostly by trial and error before the internet was available. I own a Mitsubishi industrial walking foot sewing machine and a Singer home style machine.

I made a backpack about 30 years ago that I still use. It is the only backpack I ever made but I am considering making another one.

For projects that require padding I either sew a pocket in which I insert the padding or I spray glue and sandwich closed cell foam between two piece of fabric. Closed cell foam is available in various thicknesses on line or in fabric stores.

I live in Aurora, Missouri

Photos are of my sewing machines, the backpack I made, a strap carry yoke I was working on and a wheel cover I made.

John
 

Attachments

  • 118_9223.JPG
    118_9223.JPG
    113.1 KB · Views: 10
  • 118_8537.JPG
    118_8537.JPG
    82.8 KB · Views: 9
  • 118_8534.JPG
    118_8534.JPG
    131.9 KB · Views: 9
  • 100_7631.JPG
    100_7631.JPG
    127.9 KB · Views: 10
  • 100_9979.JPG
    100_9979.JPG
    79.2 KB · Views: 10
  • 100_9978.JPG
    100_9978.JPG
    138.1 KB · Views: 10
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
516
Reaction score
143
Location
Ontario
Thank you Patrick.

Modifying and making equipment is a hobby that I enjoy. For every project that turns out there are many more that don't.
That makes 2 of us, I too learned from my mom as a cub scout and was expected to repair/ make all my own gear and badges. I'm still doing it and have repaired well over 100 tents (former scout leader/ trainer) dozens of packs, and assorted storage bags, although not as fancy as your stuff because my #1 concern is function and I really don't care about it's looks. All my sewing is done on a regular 40 yr old Kenmore that used to be owned by my mother in law, While much of the time I'm making/ repairing stuff sacks for various items, my main passion is tents, especially hot tents with all the accessories (welding / fabrication is another hobby), I've made and given away 6 so far ( all to friends and local scout leaders) each tent was made to improve on the design of the previous one. #7 will probably be a keeper, as will stove #11.
I've literally tweaked every tent I've ever had to make it work specifically for me, whether it's to add a 4" drip edge to a fly, install a more robust 2 way zipper, add tie down patches and velcro, or remove useless windows and replace them with lighter coated nylon I've done so many zippers I buy it by the yard, and most of my repairs/ alterations are easy to spot because I use a lot of cannibalized fabrics to keep them out of the landfill, so colours and types of fabric are often mismatched
Everyone that criticizes me for using it gets the same response "I'm good with machines, and it's a machine isn't it?"
 
Joined
Oct 24, 2021
Messages
24
Reaction score
5
You can do a lot with a home machine. I've had straight stitch industrials that were really just beefy, fast machines but wouldn't go through a half inch of webbing and Cordura. My consew 206rlb 18 would, but I just didn't need a triple feed for most stuff, so I sold it. Unfortunately, now I need to buy another. I might want a side business in retirement, doing repairs at campsites out of the airstream. Maybe. I don't know yet. And retirement is still a long way off. Anyway, I just use a Necchi Lydia 3 now. Works fine. Miss that knee lift though.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
839
Reaction score
218
Location
Mid coast, Maine
Nice sewing! I too break out the machine on occasion. Most of my early sewing was on a Singer treadle machine. Now I have a Singer from the ‘50’s and a Sailrite walking foot. I’ll see if I can find some pics or take some pics of some projects. I’ve also done a bit hand sewing with a needle and palm, and of course a speedy stitcher.
Jim
 
Joined
Oct 11, 2020
Messages
170
Reaction score
90
I’ve also done a bit hand sewing with a needle and palm, and of course a speedy stitcher.
Jim

Most of my hand sewing has been done with leather. I have hand stitched several gun holsters, knife sheaths, flashlight holders, cell phone holders, steering wheel covers and other leather projects.

John

100_9982.JPG100_9983.JPG
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
839
Reaction score
218
Location
Mid coast, Maine
These are the sewing machines I have. A Sailrite walking foot, a Singer 301a, and a Singer Featherweight which is a marvelous machine.

0DD114A5-E3F8-4695-84E6-F3355CB0237A.jpegAF3DCB9D-7EB7-4685-A185-864B5ACF1629.jpeg4B05128F-79E6-4723-ADC7-9FE0794CF1F9.jpeg

Don’t know why I can’t seem to add more photos to this post.
Jim
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
499
Reaction score
281
Location
Bozeman, MT
These are the sewing machines I have. A Sailrite walking foot, a Singer 301a, and a Singer Featherweight which is a marvelous machine.

View attachment 128531

Don’t know why I can’t seem to add more photos to this post.
Jim
I have had one of those tan ones for near on 40 years. It was never the same after I sewed a raptor observation blind out of old treated canvas (with the granular treatment falling into the inner workings). Even after having it professionally cleaned, it's marginal. I bought a new basic Singer (like Johnny 5s), and I was amazed that I could actually sew something without screaming at the top of my lungs.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2015
Messages
839
Reaction score
218
Location
Mid coast, Maine
Yup when they don’t work it’s not pretty. There are quite a few YouTube videos on repair and timing of that Singer 103a. If you still have it.
Jim
 
Top