16' OTCA for Solo Tripping?

G

Guest

Guest
I am looking at a 1948 16' OTCA for a planned Northern Forest Canoe Trip beginning in June. Share thoughts, please.
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
596
Location
Aberdeen, MD
That's going to weigh what? About 75 lbs? If you don't mind portaging it, you'll be happy. I've got a 1950 Yankee 16', and it's a bear for me to portage... Love to paddle it, but it's heavy. Much prefer using a borrowed 15' 1944 OT 50#er for solo trips. Makes a world of difference.

Capacity-wise, you're good for a couple weeks of supplies at 16'. Can't speak to it's particular handling characteristics, as I'm not that smart on hull shapes.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
425
Location
Maryland, USA
Same comment as Seeker. There are 65 or so MILES of portages on the NFCT if you plan on a through paddle, and that is if you single carry.That would be almost 200 miles if you double carry. There is a lot of upstream paddling that often gets lined or portaged also. A lot of it is cart freindly but not all. I think I have read every blog of the thru paddlers on the NFCT and you can learn a lot by doing that if you haven't already. It is a trip I have thought of doing but that is TOO much walking carrying loads for my old knees. Good luck with the planning.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
3,692
Location
Appleton, Maine
I like wood canvas canoes, and I admire your desire to use one for your planned NFCT thru paddle. I am presently helping a friend restore an OCTA and I think they are a fine canoe, unfortunately I have never paddled one.

Sometimes finding the right canoe at the right price when you need one can be a problem, especially if you want to use a wood canvas canoe.

If I was going to thru paddle the NFCT with a wood canvas canoe, I would use my 15' Chestnut Chum or have a 15' canoe built just for the trip, if I didn't have the Chum already.
Resupply on the NFCT is pretty easy from what I have gathered, you pass through towns and that is where you can resupply regularly. No need for heavy food packs, so no need for a big canoe. 16' is fine for a solo tripper (I used a 16' Chestnut Pal for many years solo), but my trips where never more than 2 weeks. I think your trip will be around 7 weeks, the OCTA will probably start out around 70-75lbs., and after some rain, depending on how much, it will gain some weight.

You have some pretty long portages on the trail, not all are wheel-able so that big heavy canoe could be a problem.

On the other hand, the OCTA at 16' would float high for poling upstream or going down bony streams and rivers, which could be a big plus. If aesthetics are of some importance, it would be a beauty out there on the trail.

If you think you could handle the weight from the get go, then maybe a water-proof canoe cover for those rainy days would help. I have used them, I made one from the floor of a worn out Timberline tent and it was great. Kept me warm, kept my gear dry, and most of all, kept the canoe dry and not water logged.
It made rainy days bearable.

Also, the condition of the canvas on the canoe is important. I would say it should be a fairly new canvas and I would pass on adding a keel, they are leak waiting to happen. I doubt if a keel would hold up for that long a trip without leakage and a serious weight gain. (imho)

A new canvas, some duct tape and some cain to repair the seat which will probably not hold up. A wood canvas canoe on the trail in good shape is nice, a wood canvas canoe with a duct taped seat half way thru sends the wrong message, again imho.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Thanks, folks, you are re-affirming my thoughts. Robin hit the real problem right on the head....finding the right boat in the shirt window I have to prepare for this trip. Funding, in approved, will be announce February 21 and released a few days later. I've found no one that can begin a build on March 1 and complete the project by early June. My first choice would be to have a Cheemaun built. I'm keeping my eyes open for a Pal or 50-lb.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
3,692
Location
Appleton, Maine
I had a friend, Mike Hurley, he wrote Hurley's Journal back when. He owned a wood canvas Cheemaun, wide slow canoe, at 62-65 lbs, a little heavy too. 15'x35", too wide for such a long trip. I
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
425
Location
Maryland, USA
Whenever I apply for funding it is my wife who releases it (or not)!! Good luck getting your funding approved.
Dave
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
596
Location
Aberdeen, MD
Is it important that you do the trip in a wood/canvas canoe? Might you be able to move funding from the "build/buy" column into the "rent a really slick, lightweight carbon-fiber wonder" column?
 
Joined
Jul 25, 2012
Messages
838
As relating to the cane canoe seats: After I read the above, a memory slowly came to mind. Gil Gilpatrick in his book "Building Outdoor Gear" talks about how real cane isn't the best for canoe seats; in damp weather (what other kind is there for a canoe seat?) the natural stuff stretches and upon drying won't come back tight again. What he uses is a plastic kind of cane. Impervious to moisture and much stronger. In the back of the book he lists suppliers and at least two offer the plastic cane.
He's got a whole chapter on how to do caning and several projects using the idea. (a packboard and several seats) I like his book.

Best Wishes, Rob
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
3,472
You are right Rob. Every cane seat I have owned, even before i got fat, stretched then broke. I really like the feel of them when brand new, but they never lasted very long for me.
 
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
1,831
Location
Schenectady, NY
I have laced several seats using synthetic snow shoe lacing. The neoprene covering looks traditional and the nylon core keeps stretch to a minimum, and it doesn't absorb water. Makes for a very comfortable seat that lasts a long time.
 
Top