What are you reading?

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"Becoming Teddy Roosevelt". I had no idea Maine and a Maine Guide played such an important role in Roosevelt's life.

 
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Bark Canoes: The Art and Obsession of Tappan Adney, by John Jennings

I read this years ago, along with John McPhee’s Survival of the Birch bark Canoe,long before I developed an interest in wood (and canvas) canoes. I now more easily recognize the transition to wood/canvas canoes and how some early commercial builders maintained bark canoe style components for some time into the (somewhat) modern era.
 
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I have been reading Paris, paris - Journey into the City of Light by David Downie.
Jumping around the book reading chapters in no particular order I've enjoyed learning many layers of culture, beauty, and history,
but finally in chapter one I discovered some early Parisian history connecting it to canoes.

"At once water and sewer, lifeline, moat, and swelling menace, the Seine suckled nascent French civilization. It made the founding of Paris possible, transforming a settlement of mud huts into a capital city whose symbol since the year 1210 is a ship, with the catchy device Fluctuat nec mergitur: "It is tossed upon the waves without being submerged"...

"Five thousand years ago that benign river provided France's mythicized forebears - Nos Ancêtres les Gaulois - with food, potables, and the protection they needed to build their island -city, which the Romans eventually called Lutetia. Until the 1980's no trace of the Seine Basin's early fisherfolk had been found, but while reconfiguring the formerly industrial Bercy area's warehouses, workmen turned up several Neolithic canoes...City officials quickly latched onto the canoes, seeing in them a symbol of pre-Roman civilization and the solution to an etymological mystery. The canoes jibe with the Celtic-language hypothesis of the origin of "Lutetia": luh (river) + touez (in the middle) + y (house), meaning "houses in midstream", an apparent reference to what is now the Île de la Cité and Île Saint-Louis." David Downie

So naturally I ventured down that archeology / canoe rabbit hole and found some further good reading.
 
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Expensive coffee table book borrowed from the library after a long wait in line... Georgian Bay-Discovering a Unique North American Ecosystem, Edited by Nick Eyles. Worth reading if only for the first chapter on geology by Eyles... really good insight on why the eastern North American landscape is the way it is including the last two billion years' worth of continental plates colliding to form the Appalachians and features west into the Canadian shield and Georgian Bay.

PS... a long, long time ago in another world on a canoe trip, I read what some say may be the best science fiction book ever written, Dune. The first movie adaptation filmed in the eighties failed bigtime, with even the director later apologizing for the poor quality... however the second kick at it is being released Oct 22 with some great reviews. So far it's getting a high 88% on Rotten Tomatoes... shot for the big screen and reading Dune first if you're a sci-fi reader before seeing the much-anticipated spectacle would probably help. Hey, winter's coming.

 
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About the finish up "Paddling the Wild Neches" by RICHARD M. DONOVAN. I've done a race on the river and have paddled some sections of it. I am hoping to do some camping trips down it in the future. While reading I like looking on google maps and typing in the names he calls out and following him down through his journey. Hopefully the river stays the way it is with only one lake on it and it stays wild and free.
 
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What is everybody reading?

I just finished reading/ looking at "In the Footsteps of Grey Owl : Journey Into the Ancient Forest" by Gary McGuffin, Joanie McGuffin. I must say not what I had imagined but inspiring and great photos.

I just received "Lands Serene" by Peter Kazaks.
"The Sicilian" by Mario Puzo
 
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The Border, A Journey Around Russia through North Korea, China, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Finland, Norway and the Northeast Passage. (Erika Fatland, 2017, english publication 2021)

That’s a long title. History and geography disguised as a travelogue. Fascinating and informative, it bogs down a bit when Fatland, who is Norwegian, gets close to home. There is even a tiny bit of paddling, as Fatland and her father kayak camp along the Pasvik River border.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show...arch=true&from_srp=true&qid=cKp8OVUGKd&rank=1
 
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"People of the Deer" by Farley Mowat. If you've spent any time in the Barrens, it's fun. We stopped by his cabin (remnants) on the Windy River a couple of years ago. The later "No Man's River" takes place in the same area, and is probably a better read.22-1093r.JPG
 
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I took "People of The Deer" and a book by Alan Kesselhiem "Water And Sky" on a trip and coincidently they were both about the same area and they met the same families, or so it seemed to me.

I would recommend "Water and Sky", I liked it enough to read twice.
 
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I took "People of The Deer" and a book by Alan Kesselhiem "Water And Sky" on a trip and coincidently they were both about the same area and they met the same families, or so it seemed to me.

I would recommend "Water and Sky", I liked it enough to read twice.
Yeah, I've read it twice too! Kesselheim was a longtime local (Bozeman MT), until about a year ago. I picked his brain on some northern trips--he's done some neat stuff.
 
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I have this book also Robin, even if you didn’t know how to read the paintings and drawings would be worth the price of admission. This book will give you plenty of idea’s to mull over during the coming long winter nights, while reading by the warm stove and sipping hot tea from your blue speckled tin cup.
Winter has already started here, so I am going to dig out my copy this afternoon. I plan to start re-reading this evening. I will toast to you, with my speckled blue cup tonight.
 
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