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solo tent with roomy vestibule?

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I'm looking for a somewhat light weight solo tent that's not a complete doghouse (would consider a lighter weight two person) with a vestibule large enough to sit and cook in. Any suggestions/pictures?
 
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I know a non freestanding tent seems to be going backwards in technology but they may go up as quick or quicker and meet your needs better than what is available in a freestanding. I think they'd be worth a look.
 
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Sorry for straying off topic, but I worry that cooking in my tent vestibule would impregnate the tent with food odor. A tent that smells like a kitchen seems like an invitation to critters like ants, mice, raccoons and larger animals to explore your tent. It just seems like a bad idea.

I do like a tent with a vestibule of sufficient size that rain doesn't get in the tent when you open the vestibule. And, a real bonus is a vestibule big enough you can take off your wet gear before entering the tent. Since 2018 my canoe camping tent is a Teton Sports 2. Not sure what constitutes a doghouse, but I decided to take a flier and see what kind of tent $120 could buy. I've used it about 40 nights and it's been okay. A cross pole holds the fly away from the tent door, so I can open the vestibule without getting rain in the tent, but it's not big enough to get in and take off wet gear. One could cook in the vestibule. I don't expect the tent to last a long time, but so far it has been solid.
 
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Ditto, the concern about cooking odor. Additionally, cooking in an enclosed tent can allow the accumulation of carbon monoxide depending on the fuel used- or perhaps all fuels produce this to varying degrees.

In the dead of winter atop Gray Peak in the Adirondacks, my son and I cooked soup in our tent on my Svea 123 as an appetizer before dinner. We both passed out and awoke later to finish the meal. To this day I don't know if it was from carbon monoxide or simple fatigue, but ever since I've been very careful about ventilation when winter camping & cooking in the tent. Not as much of an issue in the other seasons since the tent is unlikely to be buttoned up tight.
 
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Sorry for straying off topic, but I worry that cooking in my tent vestibule would impregnate the tent with food odor. A tent that smells like a kitchen seems like an invitation to critters like ants, mice, raccoons and larger animals to explore your tent. It just seems like a bad idea.

There has been little input from the OP and since you brought it up, I have cooked in my tent but I prefer to take a separate shelter for cooking and lounging in for several reasons. I prefer to keep food odors away from my sleeping area and I am not a fan of vestibules. I like to have a view outside and often tents vestibules must be zipped closed when raining which can inhibits outside view.
 
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I like to have a view outside and often tents vestibules must be zipped closed when raining which can inhibits outside view.
Although I’m a tarp user when tripping solo we do take a tent when traveling as a couple. A vestibule gives you somewhere to shed wet rain gear and footwear. We also leave the bear spray and TP kit in the vestibule at night. Our dog also slept there when she could be persuaded to in out of the rain. A good tent vestibule should be able to be left open, at least partly during rainy weather. Our Hilleberg tent door can be opened at the top, protected by a large hooped vent and I have been very impressed by the doors on our X-Mid which have stayed open during some very heavy rain.
 
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I would only cook in there in a pinch. Mostly I want to put wet gear and be able to get in/out of the tent without the rainfly right on top of me. Thanks for the various links, including the detachable vestibules. Very interesting. My current tent is a Big Agnes UL Copper spur two person. I personally hate the tiny vestibule and what it does to getting in and out of the tent. I see they now sell a rainfly with a much bigger vestibule for my tent version, but it's only compatible with the 2020 version.
 
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Ditto on your comments about the tiny vestibule. One of my criteria for selecting a tent has been that it must have a vestibule large enough for me to get into and then close before opening the tent. I've found that in bad weather this is a necessity to allow me to remove my wet gear outside the living area and decrease the amount of wetness that gets inside the tent. Some vestibules are so small that you have to open the interior tent door before you can close the vestibule zipper which means in rainy, windy weather the inside of the tent gets wet not to mention that you are entering the interior of the tent with your wet gear still on. Another issue for me is that I don't bend as well as I used to so squeezing into a small vestibule is not easily done.
I have seen people address the too small vestibule problem by putting a small tarp partially over the tent and over an area at the vestibule door. This tarp keeps that area relatively dry and serves as a changing room.
Sorry - no help with the original question. It's been a long time since I've needed a new tent.
 
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I know that @tomo said NO to non-freestanding tents but I'm going to toss this out anyway as it's already been alluded to. Many of the shelters offered by Seek Outside, Luxe, Pomoly, etc. are very easy to pitch. My favorite solo shelter (and two would be fine without the stove) is my Luxe "Minipeak XL". It's a simple rectangle, gives good head room, has two doors and lots of floor space. The weight is just under 3 pounds and it packs easily. Honestly, while I still see the value in a good quality, free standing tent, my Minipeak XL is every bit as good a shelter and well worth bringing on trips.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper
 
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Although I mostly hammock camp now, I decided to make a new gear addition - a Pomoly StoveHut 70. I like all the options with it, including that I can use my hot stove with it if I don't want to use the vestibule for gear storage. I especially like the open front with the roof and side walls. The only drawback is that right now it takes a long time to get one (40-60 days).

stovehut70.jpg
 

Glenn MacGrady

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Although I mostly hammock camp now, I decided to make a new gear addition - a Pomoly StoveHut 70. I like all the options with it, including that I can use my hot stove with it if I don't want to use the vestibule for gear storage. I especially like the open front with the roof and side walls. The only drawback is that right now it takes a long time to get one (40-60 days).

View attachment 128944
That's an interesting and inexpensive tent even without the stovepipe feature. Do you have to rig it somehow so you can lower that front roof in the rain, or will it keep most rain out even when it is up?
 
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Hi Glenn, I don't have it yet so I can't speak from experience, but I believe the front roof zips closed when down, so I would do the same as I do with my hammock tarp in porch mode - if the forecast is for heavy wind-driven rain overnight, I lower it before turning in. If it is just a drizzle with little or no wind, I don't find that necessary and that's with my hammock tarp not having side panels like the StoveHut. I am planning on using a (Marchway) cot in it, as I no longer sleep comfortably on the ground.
 
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