• Happy National Acadian Day!

Must have medical items?

Joined
Apr 18, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
131
Location
TC, Michigan
After reading several posts on here and wanting to go paddle now.. it made me think of some particular or potential situations that I could be in. And if in those situations what would I need or do?

When it comes to the things I absolute am passionate about, I refuse to give them up. And I won’t! I’ll find a way to continue to enjoy them even if it means alternating the way I do them. Whatever they might be

I recently was diagnosed with two potentially fatal and rare diseases along with two other “diseases”. The two big factors are called Aplastic Anemia and PNH (Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria). Basically one produces less bone marrow/blood cells, and the other attacks those that are produced because they lack a protein and enzyme.

So instead of diving into all of that, what happens is I get really tired and fatigued. Especially with anything active {Treatment is on its way, which should boost my system in gear}. It made me think.. rethink… consider…etc what I do or want to do and what to bring!

For me, if I get a cut.. which happens alllll of the time with work, wood working, life, I can’t clot the bleeding as easily or quickly. I needed to consider this Strongly while wanting to be in the middle of nowhere. I picked up a few quick clots, I keep one on my work saddle in case of a major gash. They work great! I packed a few tampons and absorption pads. Needless to say, my first aid has expanded lol. I also have to take two pills orally twice a day and those HAVE to come everywhere.

I also picked up a Spot gps device, which I should’ve had anyways. I went with a nicer model (Gen4) but not the top dog. This gives my wife, friends and family a little more relief of me not listening to them. I have it programmed to auto track every few minutes and a couple auto texts. It’s compact, decently lightweight and could save someone’s life. If not mine own.

I also keep on hand some herbal knowledge. While helping and watching my wife forage plants/roots/berries and turn them into teas. Food. Salves. And pretty much anything else. I’ve learnt a lot from her on what to look for. How to use it. And we take notes of this. This has helped me tremendously and I thank her the most for it as my own spirituality never committed to eating what I didn’t know. P. S. Yarrow is a fantastic blood stopper, I’ve shoved yarrow powder up my nose a number of times, and yes, you’ll pick and blow herbs a couple of days after. But the smell is nice 😊

I’m curious to what some of you choose to or have to bring in a first aid emergency. Either for yourself or for others. And by all means, keep any sensitive information to yourself if you don’t feel like sharing. I understand fully!
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2021
Messages
320
Reaction score
108
Location
Clayton NY
Besides basic cut and wound stuff, my meds, and Anbesol, from Wilderness First Aid training I carry a syringe for flushing wounds, a Sam Splint, and trauma shears.

Prepare your Spot list folks that an SOS could easily be for someone you came upon. Several stories of that happening and the hysteria of family.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2011
Messages
6,940
Reaction score
919
Location
Raymond, ME
Sterile 4x4 pads, EMT shears, duct tape, antibiotic ointment. Personal meds too. Bring what you have to bring for your safety. There is other stuff that takes little room like immodium pills and ibuprofen. Quick Clot is a valuable item to add. Direct pressure and elevation are the usual methods to control bleeding but sometimes you are alone and need extra help
My herbal knowledge is limited but I do travel in balsam fir country and the sap is a marvelous antiseptic and fire starter.
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
534
Reaction score
246
Location
Dodgeville, Wi
For me, much of what has been mentioned above, but also I bring hydrogen peroxide and if on a longer trip my Dr. prescribes some antibiotics as well. Hydrogen Peroxide has saved my bacon more than once on a long solo trip, so far have never needed the antibiotics but have been glad to have had them.

For my dog Jake, my Vet prescribes some pain meds like Gabapentin or Carprofen in case of an injury, and antibiotics as well.

Bob.
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
510
Reaction score
285
Location
Bozeman, MT
Hydrogen Peroxide has saved my bacon more than once on a long solo trip, so far have never needed the antibiotics but have been glad to have had them.
How so? I've had good luck with soap and water with some nasty road rashes, but use antibiotics (and soap and water) for minor cuts that don't get the attention they might have needed.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
131
Location
TC, Michigan
The syringe, splint, peroxide, and sheers are great additions. Every time I’ve broken a bone I’ve always saved my left over Vicodin, or norco, and keep them in the tiny altoids tin so I don’t get them mixed up. I’ve noticed the difference in quality of medical sheers and basic sheers. One time use, I don’t think it would matter. But year after year of updating your med kit and possible use, higher end sheers make a difference.

I think duct tape is sometimes overlooked for a med kit, we all know the thousands of uses it has for other repairs. Thanks to the Red and Green show growing up.

Dog kits are equally important to me, and we bring one every time we travel. Dogs are dogs and they’ll often times get a gauge. Which reminds me of super glue and tick key/tornado. Most kits have one already.
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
556
Reaction score
349
Location
Goshen CT
In addition to much of what has been mentioned, I bring suture for stitches and a tourniquet. Superglue and ZipStiches are a good alternative to suture while you get to medical care. A small mirror and tweezers are good to have too.

Bob
 
Joined
Aug 29, 2017
Messages
1,191
Reaction score
611
Location
Gaithersburg, MD
For anything serious or life-threatening, a PLB is a good idea. I carry a Zoleo 2-way satellite communicator with an SOS button and extra power packs/chargers for it (although the built in battery lasts a loooong time). I do carry clotting gauze to stop major bleeding. But if I'm using it, the situation is probably serious enough that I'm also activating my Zoleo.

To treat the irritations that can make you miserable and ruin a trip fast but aren't life threatening, I carry the usual OTC stuff -- pain reliever/anti-fever meds (ibuprofin), anit-diarrheal (immodium), antibiotic (neosporin), antacid (tums), antihistamine (benadryl), hydrocortisone cream, waterproof bandages in a variety of sizes, sunscreen and chapstick.
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
534
Reaction score
246
Location
Dodgeville, Wi
scratchypants, Yup, forgot that one ... one time I got stung by a bee on the lip ... no benadryl and my face swelled up big time ... not fun. Also as I grow older, stings affect me more than when I was young - the swelling gets pretty bad without Benadryl for me.

Mason, I was on a 32 day trip in WCPP just getting over a Poison Parsnips rash on my knee. Also, I was racing a forest fire trying to get to an area in the park where I would eventually meet up with others for the paddle out to our cars. Several of the portages were seriously mucky and my pants were soggy stinky mucky yuk ... and I paddled, 2 days - 9 hours straight kneeling with all that slop in the boat. Eventually I was a head of the fire, and took a day to recoup .... and noticed my knee stopped hurting from all the kneeling ... in fact I could really not feel anything around my knee. Turns out it was so swollen I could hardy remove my pants, and once off, I could not get them back on for days ... so I tripped in my under britches for a while. My knee had a raging infection where the last bit of the poison parsnips had been. I would scrape the puss out of my knee every morning, and then give a good cleaning with Hydrogen peroxide. Eventually I got ahead of the infection. However, my swollen knee was more due to a problem inside of it from too much kneeling ... can not really canoe like I once did anymore or the Knee goes poof and it is near impossible to get the swelling back down - even after surgery. The peroxide did do the trick however and the smell, heat and puss of the infection was gone in several days.

Also once slipped on a rock in camp wearing Crocs ... my foot slid forward and ripped off two toenails - they were stuck inside the shoe. Used peroxide then as well as Neosporin and band aids to keep infection away ... tough to do with wet portaging feet.

So I take that stuff with me and hope to not need it.

Bob.


 
Joined
Dec 1, 2012
Messages
472
Reaction score
235
Location
Altoona, Pennsylvania
I carry the basic stuff. I carry baby aspirin and childrens Benadryl for the dog as well as sterile water for flushing her eyes in little plastic vials. About 10% of the stuff in the first aid kit is for me and the other 90% is for her. I figure most of it is usuable for me too. Like Bob, the vet will give me one 10 day Round of antibiotics and one 10 day round for me no charge. I carry about 5 bandaids and two Packs of quick clot for big cuts, bandaids just don‘t seem to stay on that long. Might revisit the kit though, I noticed that my minor cuts on the hands don’t heal nearly as fast as they once did.
When I was a wee lad i could rub some dirt on it and wake up in the morning and not even know where the cut was. I’m getting FRAGEELEE!

I would definitely say though if I had a condition such as the OP has I would have a much more robust kit. I am glad to hear the quick clots work great. I hope the treatment is truly a magic bullet.

Cheers,
Barry
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
Messages
510
Reaction score
285
Location
Bozeman, MT
Mason, I was on a 32 day trip in WCPP just getting over a Poison Parsnips rash on my knee....
I've run into cow parsnips around Anchorage--nasty stuff, blisters everywhere. Sounds like a tough, and worrisome time.

One thing I've started taking on longer trips is athletic tape (climbers use it for taping their hands for climbing steep cracks). It's strong, much lighter than duct tape, and good for taping up pretty much anything, especially makeshift splints.
 
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
526
Reaction score
151
Location
Ontario
To all the above, I added a 3M surgical stapler, a hemostat and a pair of forceps, plus the training on using them, they're far faster than sutures and do less damage. I remember one trip where I met up with a group where everyone was panicking because a teen had hit their leg with a hatchet and they couldn't stop the bleeding, A good cleaning with a chlorhexidine sponge, a couple of minutes with the stapler, and a good dusting with quickclot, followed by normal wound dressing and she was able to get out under her own power. I later heard that she needed 19 stitches but had zero complications and that her uncontrolled bleeding could have been fatal.
I also carry Gravol and Rolaids for those times when the guts just don't feel right.
 
Joined
Aug 29, 2017
Messages
1,191
Reaction score
611
Location
Gaithersburg, MD
plus the training on using them
This is critical and often overlooked. A lot of people buy a big first aid kit and don't know how or when to use half of it. Trying to figure out if or how to use something in an emergency is not optimal. And using something you don't know how to use can make matters worse, not better. A good first aid course refresher course is something I know I need -- it's been 35 years since I last took one.
 
Joined
Feb 14, 2020
Messages
556
Reaction score
349
Location
Goshen CT
This is critical and often overlooked. A lot of people buy a big first aid kit and don't know how or when to use half of it. Trying to figure out if or how to use something in an emergency is not optimal. And using something you don't know how to use can make matters worse, not better. A good first aid course refresher course is something I know I need -- it's been 35 years since I last took one.
Very accurate- I should have qualified my post. I don’t suggest anyone stitching themselves or others up without training.

A simple BLS course is a fine idea for anyone in addition to first aid. A course called “Stop the Bleed” can be taken by anyone that goes into hemorrhage control.

Bob
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2020
Messages
115
Reaction score
131
Location
TC, Michigan
A couple of things posted on here made me realize other items in my kit and others that are not. I have a ratz tourniquet from one of my rescue courses, which is a one handed operation. Not a lot of them are but should be. I agree on having the knowledge to use these items, meds and procedures. It could save headaches later. Technical rigging is something I like to keep fresh in my mind, especially when doing river trips.

Other items I keep on hand but aren’t necessarily in my first aid kit, but I’m a way go hand in hand. I’ll pack liquid IV packets or sometimes Nuun tabs to get some electrolytes and hydration, and they work. I do suggest adding a couple more ounces of water for the liquid iv
 
Joined
Aug 1, 2011
Messages
526
Reaction score
151
Location
Ontario
A couple of things posted on here made me realize other items in my kit and others that are not. I have a ratz tourniquet from one of my rescue courses, which is a one handed operation. Not a lot of them are but should be. I agree on having the knowledge to use these items, meds and procedures. It could save headaches later. Technical rigging is something I like to keep fresh in my mind, especially when doing river trips.

Other items I keep on hand but aren’t necessarily in my first aid kit, but I’m a way go hand in hand. I’ll pack liquid IV packets or sometimes Nuun tabs to get some electrolytes and hydration, and they work. I do suggest adding a couple more ounces of water for the liquid iv
thanks for the mention of the rehydration meds, I need to check the expiry on my pedialyte powder...
 
Top