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Music for the drive to, during, or the drive back from canoe trips?

Glenn MacGrady

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What kind of music do you like to listen to on long drives to and from canoe trips, and, if you do so, while paddling or in camp? As a more specific subset of this topic, you could list favorite canoe related music as Kevin Callan did in this article:


When all I had was old time AM and FM in my old time vehicles, I used to like to listen to whatever was on the local music stations in the parts of North America I was in. Some of the stations were very funky and creative, unlike the computerized song list stations that now seem to dominate.

When I got an MP3 player I downloaded a lot of music from Napster (and its predecessor). I mostly like 50s-60s rock & roll, 40s big band and crooners, Irish/Celtic music (Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem), folk music (Joan Baez, Weavers), and certain classical.

Now that I have Sirius radio in one vehicle, I listen mostly to the 40s, 50s and 60s stations.

I don't recall ever listening to music while I paddled. I do occasionally listen to AM stations evenings in camp when I can get a signal on my multi-band two-way radio. Whatever's on. In the American South, I used to like to listen to female radio host/DJ named Delilah.
 
As I am of Scottish/Welsh heritage I have mostly listened to Celtic music for the past 30-40 years. Both my vehicles have cd players and I have a very large collection of cd’s. If I am driving my vehicle with a trip mate I test their willingness to listen to my music by cueing up some bagpipe music.


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I can listen to anything (with the exception of rap & hip-hop) and probably don't have a preference. If anyone else is in the vehicle with me, they are in charge of entertainment and finding stations although I may ask them to stop scanning if they hit a blues station, a Dropkick Murphys song or a Celtic Woman show.

When I am driving by myself the radio (which is still AM /FM only) is rarely even on unless I am struggling to stay awake on an extended drive.

I would never even consider taking a radio into the woods with me.
 
Like you, Glenn, years ago all I had was an AM and then AM/FM radio in my vehicle. That pretty much left me at the mercy of wherever I was traveling for what I could listen to. Because of that, I'd usually hear a mixture of Top 10 rock/pop music, lots of religious programming (especially in rural areas) and even the occasional baseball game in season. Eventually I moved up to a cassette deck, CD player and now have the option to use my phone. When left to my own devices, I'll usually be listening to what is now classified as Classic Rock (yup, I'm old), Irish music, blues, some country and, when I can get it, a baseball or football game depending on the time of year. While I still have a CD player in both vehicles (it's an add-on in our Rav 4), I have found Sirius/XM radio to be my friend regardless of where I'm traveling.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

snapper

PS - I've never listened to music while paddling so have nothing to offer there. I guess I get it out of my system on the drive so I can listen to nature when I'm out there.
 
I too am a long time Celtic fan (Andy M. Stewart/Silly Wizard, Cranberries, Capercaillie, Déanta, Heather Dale, Connie Dover, Altan, Alisa Jones, Lindsey Stirling, Patty Gurdy, Blackmore's Night, Loreena McKennitt, and many others in compilations).

Beyond Celtic, especially while driving to and getting into the mood for race events, I like to play what are known as Epic, or (movie) trailer music and soundtracks, the likes of those from Two Steps from heck, Ars Arcana, James Dooley ,Kerry Muzzey, Audiomachine, Hans Zimmer, John Williams, Ennio Morricone, etc.)

Renaissance and Medieval/old English are high in my collection (Cantiga, New World Renaissance Band - Owain Phyfe), I also play the likes of Viking and Icelandic folk sounds and from Scandinavia (Wardruna, etc.),

Canadian Folk (Tanglefoot, Stan Rogers) and French Folk (Voyageur songs to paddle to). You can throw Gregorian Chants into the mix.

My heritage is Eastern European, so my playlist also includes active Slavic folk sounds of music from Poland, Ukraine and Russia (Диана Анкудинова, Отава Ё, Русская Рать, Oi Šermukšnio (winged Hussars), Если девушка казачка (Ukraine Cossack & Caucasus sword dance music),Ой Что То Мы Засиделись Братцы, Ойся, ты, ойся", Кремль, Национальная Казачья ), Ehi Ukhniem (Volga boatmen’s song).

Finally, I grew up in the 60's, so many of especially the early 60's tunes are included. For example, the Beatles before they put drug influences into their music (Rubber soul was the last of the love song Beatles era), other eclectic oddball band sounds (The Bosstown/Boston Sounds of Ultimate Spinach, Beacon Street union, Spirit), The Electric Prunes, Jethro Tull, King Crimson, Blues Magoos, not forgetting my most favorite - of all from the era -the Moody Blues.

Strange mix, huh?
 
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Favorite songs about canoeing:

The Old Canoe


D.Bain



Canoe Song


Rachelle van Zanten



Lucifer’s Portage




Black Spruce


Ian Tamblyn



When I first stepped in a Canoe


BW Paddler



Paddle Like heck


Tanglefoot



La v'la m'amie (traditional Voyageur song)​

Tanglefoot​

Canoe Song​

Peter Mayer​

You Got to Get Your Paddle Wet (rated “R”)​

??
 
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For traveling in wild country I play a lot of Grateful Dead. I like the "Spa Channel" on Sirius XM. Mostly instrumental, new age and ethereal music like Tangerine Dream.

I like alt country, Jason Isbell, Corb Lund. Sometimes the Jimmy Buffett and some classic rock music like Jethro Tull, Moody Blues, Allman Brothers, Marshall Tucker Band, I like Texas Swing, Celtic music is great. I like old blues like Lightnin Hopkins and Robert Johnson. Ian Tyson any time.
 
Listening to an interesting podcast makes a long drive breeze by.

I only listen to music when working in the garage or lifting weights.

Got to be careful about implanting ‘ear worms’ before a trip because you’ll be singing that song the whole time. Once on a trip with the wife we dropped the kids at the grandparents on the way. My oldest kept commandeering the radio and playing this song called “poop in my fingernails”. You can look that up on YouTube if you are really curious. It’s low-brow toilet humor but a catchy tune… Guess what we’d end up singing the whole trip?
 
Music goes in phases for me. I'll hardly listen at all for a couple years and then get back into it again. Right now I've been enjoying listening again. I'm a big Bob Dylan fan (I prefer his early 90's to current music). I've never been a big hard rock fan but recently have been enjoying some TOOL. I've also been going back to listen to rock music from my teens (mid-90's) and have found that some of it is trash and others are great. I discovered Audioslave, who I'd somehow never even heard of, and have been listening to them a lot.

But, like Mem said, audio books are what I spend most of my time listening to.

Either that or nothing at all. I can enjoy multi-day car drives with nothing but my own thoughts to entertain/torture me.

Alan
 
I don't have any particular music that I listen to when going to or coming home from a canoe trip. The one song that I won't listen to while driving to a canoe trip is, Dueling Banjos, from Deliverance.
 
Favorite songs about canoeing:

The Old Canoe


D.Bain



Canoe Song


Rachelle van Zanten



Lucifer’s Portage




Black Spruce


Ian Tamblyn



When I first stepped in a Canoe


BW Paddler



Paddle Like heck


Tanglefoot



La v'la m'amie (traditional Voyageur song)​

Tanglefoot​

Canoe Song​

Peter Mayer​

You Got to Get Your Paddle Wet (rated “R”)​

??
Thank you for sharing these… really enjoyed the listen…especially Lucifer’s Portage
 
Usually, listen to radio. On long trips, there are rules. Find a station with music and listen until they start talking or the signal fades. Any lyrical references to beer, blue jeans, or pickups result in an immediate change of station. And similes count. For example “suds” = beer. “Flat bed ford” = pickup, and so forth; change the station. So, I hear many genres.

Some places in the country there are few stations and those tend to be political screaming. No music anywhere on the dial. i am glad I don’t live in those parts.

The most frequent formats of stations tends to be country and classic rock. There was mention above of computerized play lists. The classic rock stations must all be on the same list. Of all the thousands of classic rock songs, I’ll tend to hear the same songs repeat as I drive from one station’s listening range to another station in a different area. It can’t just be coincidence that I hear the same song, at different times, of course, as I drive across multiple states.
 
Sirius for music 'cause it follows wherever you go...Bluegrass, Big Band, Chill, Watercolors, Bluesville, the Blend, used to enjoy local stations but as mentioned too much political screaming/idiocy now...used to be able to hear interesting info about towns you were passing but not so much today.
 
In 1966, at the age of 14, I went on my first real mountain trip to the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, New Hampshire. We spent a week traversing all the summits of the range. In those days the only viable radio in the car was Top 40, AM radio. FM was barely a "thing" yet and so the songs of that year remain in my mind as the music to listen to when on a road trip anticipating an adventure. I have to admit it's really just when I'm alone... nobody else gets the allure of all that pop music. I have a 1966 themed Pandora station programmed into my phone to connect via bluetooth to my truck radio.

 
anything by Jerry Vandiver Once I could not find my coffee supply day one of the trip and this song just haunted me until I did find it at the bottom of the barrel
 
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