General Trip Gear

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We've used these effectively for years, even the 3rd week in June which is the week we usually one of the weeks we always paddle.
If there's a breeze they are deployed upwind of the site or around the perimeter when there is no wind or a shifting wind. We plan one box/night with an extra one or two/trip.
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I bring:
down sleeping bag (0 or 32 degree)
NeoAir mattress
Big Agnes solo tent (or Hennessy Hammock just purchased)
Helinox chair
Goretex rain gear
full change of clothes if cold weather, otherwise I wear what I start out with (all clothing is full synthetic, all my socks are wool)
Sven saw
Kelly Kettle
Noah's tarp
cold weather clothes to suit (always down insulation)
titanium cup and long handled spork
a couple Bic lighters, strike on nearly anything matches
Sawyer squeeze water filter and two 1 liter bottles (one for gathering water, 1 for filtered water)
Maps, compass, GPS, full size DSLR
Osprey backpack, 70L I think
One paddle (bent shaft, built by me)
NRS PFD
Small mirror (for picking crap out of my eye)
Blistex

All food and snacks are dried and vacuum bagged at home, no plates, no pots, no pans, no soap, no pillow
That's it for solo trips
If with others, I might be able to bring less
 
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I must be the only one to bring an Umbrella !
It is so handy ! It's a tarp you can take in the canoe, and use in a canoe, and not only to repel rain. I can cook under it, It can provide wind protection, when cooking. I can go to the Latrine in the middle of a rain storm, and stay dry ! It can be set up in one second. I can use it as a walking stick. It might work to scare off a bear ! ( That one I haven't tried, so No endorsement on that !) Tarp, or Umbrella ? Give me an Umbrella !

PS. I use a big Golf Umbrella, for the record.
 
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I love lists, here‘s my solo stuff:

Canoe
Yoke
Paddles
Paddle straps
Life jacket
Throw bags
Sponge
Wrap kit
Spray deck
Repair kit
Bailing/pee bucket

Tent
Bug tent
Tarp
Poles
Pegs
Tarp ropes
Camp chair
Sleeping bag
Sleeping pad
Clothes
Sheep Boots
Shoes
Rain gear
Sealine 30L day pack
Food barrels
Duluth Pack
Sealine 110L or 70L

Water bottles
Water purifier
Pots
Fry bake
Cup/mug
Flipper
2 spoons
Plate
Tupperware Wannigan
Stove
Fuel
Fire box/twig stove
Lighters and matches
Dish soap
Scrubber
Fire gloves
Belt knife
Saw
Axe/hatchet

Maps and case,
Camera
Inreach
GPS and case
Contacts info
Batteries
Charging cords
Headlamp
Compass
Shotgun
Shells
Dry bag case
pen bangers
bear perimeter system
Book/diary
Fishing rods
Lures
Net

Head net/bug jacket
Bug dope
Teeth stuff
Sunglasses
Sunscreen
First aid
TP for corn hole

All this fits in 1 Duluth, 1 big sealine, food barrel or 2 , and a day pack, so three trip portage pretty much no matter if it’s a 2 week or 5 week trip. The Duluth gets the kitchen, fire stuff and tents (in light weight dry bags), the big sealine gets clothes and sleeping stuff and other sensitive stuff, the day pack gets rain gear, emergency/hygiene stuff and the spray deck when it’s not on the boat. If I’m in the paddling in the boreal in the heat of summer I can get away with just the Duluth, 30 L day pack and a food barrel by taking a one person tent and lots less clothes and boots.
Not much changes when my partner and kids come, add a few toys and lots of stickers and a bigger first aid kit.
 
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Good thread Clint.
Thank you.
The cot was a first for me
I have been thinking about moving to a cot. I am getting tired of sleeping on the ground. I bought the Klymit Static V sleeping pads for this trip. I'll see how well they work.
Littlbug twig stove
A twig stove is something I would like to add if I ever change the way I bring food. I usually fix a meal for 5-6 people before hand, freeze it, then during the trip put it in the dutch oven to reheat the meal. I wonder how well the the twig stove would work for that?
In the spirit of sharing equipment ideas, here are 2 small screen shelters that I have used. Both are relatively compact and lightweight.
I love these shelters and the chairs that you have posted before. Good ideas.
We plan one box/night with an extra one or two/trip.
These are a very good idea!
All food and snacks are dried and vacuum bagged at home
Just picked up a dehydrator this fall and did a bunch of pears off of my trees. Want to try some meals for some trips some time.
I must be the only one to bring an Umbrella !
Good idea Jim. When I fished on the Gulf in a kayak I had a small umbrella that clamped to my kayak seat that had a bendable shaft to help keep the sun off. Didn't think about taking one on a trip with me.
Every year about half way through a trip I always think. "It sure would be nice to have a sponge" But then I always forget to add it to the list. Thanks for the reminder.
 
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I find a Twig stove is very good for the type of tripping I do, solo with ho hum meals. It's great at boiling water, ok at frying fish, and if you need a long steady low heat not very good.

I forgot to mention a sponge, I stuff one up in the bow of my canoe and use it often, especially if it's raining or I encouter sand/mud.
 
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Jonny 5 posted a pic of his Nemo bug shelter. I have tripped on multi day routes and used the Nemo 9x9 for my dog Jake and myself. it was the only shelter we used - no tent. I simply set up in the bush a bit deeper, and if (when) a storm with driving rain occured, I dropped one corner and made a Diamond fly out of it, keeping the rain and wind away from us. I think it is a great piece of kit.

That said, the CCS lean one does a great job as well - I set with the back of the tent to the lake, not the best view, but wind and driving rain flows over the back, the fly is still open and I can make coffee on my twig stove sitting in a cozy tent, using the opening like my tarp ... without having to set up or carry another one.

Bob.
 
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Since most of our meals are "just add boiling water" we find a Ghillie Kettle works really well.

IMG_1560[1] by Chris Randall, on Flickr

we'll often have the Kettle running before or alongside a larger fire as it boils water so quickly

The only downside is the bulk so on longer trips we'll take one my twig stoves, this a Nomad XT in titanium. Not as efficient as the Ghillie but packs to *" by 4" by 1/4" and only weighs 6oz

IMG_1223[1] by Chris Randall, on Flickr
 
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Jonny 5 posted a pic of his Nemo bug shelter. I have tripped on multi day routes and used the Nemo 9x9 for my dog Jake and myself. it was the only shelter we used - no tent. I simply set up in the bush a bit deeper, and if (when) a storm with driving rain occured, I dropped one corner and made a Diamond fly out of it, keeping the rain and wind away from us. I think it is a great piece of kit.

That said, the CCS lean one does a great job as well - I set with the back of the tent to the lake, not the best view, but wind and driving rain flows over the back, the fly is still open and I can make coffee on my twig stove sitting in a cozy tent, using the opening like my tarp ... without having to set up or carry another one.

Bob.

Bob, I sewed additional hanging loops to the ridge of my 9' x 9' Nemo bugout so that I could suspend it from a trunk line with prusik cords. This allowed me to set it up quicker and tighter. It also reduced stress on the 2 end ridge suspension loops which are known to become torn. I also made a set of poles so that I didn't have to rely on trees. Sold the bugout and went to freestanding shelters.

I considered the CCS Lean to use as a cooking/ hangout shelter but prefer freestanding shelters. The blue shelter in the photo is one I modified to reduce weight and pack size. It has zip down sides that block wind and rain if needed.
 

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I only use a stove to heat water. I prefer butane canister stoves but also use an alcohol stove on occasions. The pot stand of the alcohol stove I use can be used as a twig stove. I like the simplicity of twig stoves but find them too messy to operate and hate cleaning the soot off my kettle.
 

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I really like the Kelley Kettles and they are the only stove I take. Since this picture was taken I bought the middle size also and the Lift Kit that keeps the firepot off the ground.
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Clint,
Once you start drying your own meals, you’ll likely never go back to prepackaged bags of sodium. And all your favorite recipes too.

Bothwell,
Never heard of ghillie! I guess they’re the competition for Kelly?
Either one is fantastic for boiling water quickly, and never run out of fuel, or have to carry that fuel. What could be better?
 
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I tried drying my own meals but never really got that into it. The only thing I dry anymore is fruit (apples and bananas) and frozen veggies (peas and carrots). The rest of my meals are easily available as dry ingredients that won't spoil and cook just as quickly as rehydrated. Lentils and quinoa are quick cookers and taste great and go with the dried veggies. Bannock mix, oatmeal, and peanut butter constitute most of the remaining food (other than snacks).

What I like most about separate ingredients is that I can mix and match and change portions to suit.

Alan
 
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The twig stove hard at work. When you have the fry bake to go with it, it opens up a lot of culinary doors. Pretty sure there’s chilli and corn bread cooking in that pic.

I’m with ya Johnny on the bug shelters. Good freestanding bug tents are hard to find these days. Ended up making one for solo stuff from a beach shelter. We use a mec mantis too and really like it, for some reason most people don’t seem to tho.
 

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...
I’m with ya Johnny on the bug shelters. Good freestanding bug tents are hard to find these days. Ended up making one for solo stuff from a beach shelter. ...

Hmmm, I have an old beach shelter that never gets used, I wonder if a few yards of bug netting would get me a decent bug tent. Have to try that in the back yard. CT is an endless source of winter projects.
 
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Dehydrated food cozys used for rehydrating meals and repackaging meals into ziploc freezer bags in order to save on dishes and cleanup is a common practice. Some feel that rehydrating in plastic freezer bags is a heath risk.
 

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Being a solo paddler it's a no-brainer for me to simply eat straight out of the pot. I've never liked the idea of the mess and waste involved with rehydrating in a baggy. The baggies that hold dry ingredients get reused multiple times.

I intentionally cook meals that are easy cleanup, generally no more than a quick rinse of the pot.

Alan
 
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Being a solo paddler it's a no-brainer for me to simply eat straight out of the pot. I've never liked the idea of the mess and waste involved with rehydrating in a baggy. The baggies that hold dry ingredients get reused multiple times.

I intentionally cook meals that are easy cleanup, generally no more than a quick rinse of the pot.

Alan

I tried the cozys but I prefer freezer bags in a cup that nestles with my kettle. I repackage my meals to conserve space and for convenience. My meals are already portioned in the bags and I do not reuse the bags so for me it makes sense to rehydrate and eat from the bags simplifying preperation and cleanup.

John
 

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Bothwell,
Never heard of ghillie! I guess they’re the competition for Kelly?
Either one is fantastic for boiling water quickly, and never run out of fuel, or have to carry that fuel. What could be better?
I think Kelly Kettle and Ghillie Kettle are part of the same company, not what if any of the differences are. I think the generic name for them is "storm kettle"
 
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