Fears while paddling or on canoe trips

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.......So I share Robins concern about what is going on at home, especially solo. If I ever solo again I will get a two way texting system like the Inreach.

Having the two way texting SPOT X worked for me. In the past I carried a one way SPOT messenger, but these days that two way messaging of the SPOT X turned out to be a great way to stay in touch with my wife and kids.
I'm going to be part of a moose hunt in northern Maine in October and again that SPOT X will ad an extra feeling of security to all involed, in the woods and those at home.
 
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They took my whole camp set up and greeted me with guns . They had set up a hunting camp. That was some 20 years ago. I had been away from camp teaching canoeing at Paul Smiths. Nowadays with more yahoos in the Daks I am more sensitive to hearing stories, as isolated as they may be about break ins and stolen goods. Plus since canoeing the North Maine Woods I just find access easier here and never any traffic. As you know LEO's in the Adirondacks have a big range of area to cover and there aren't that many of them.
Unfortunate, that the ADLs of now are not like when I lived there some 60 years ago.

I was on a trip to Iceland when a family member passed away. We were on the far side of the island in a car and getting out before the funeral could not happen. The funeral had to happen a certain day, now we are the black sheep. So I share Robins concern about what is going on at home, especially solo. If I ever solo again I will get a two way texting system like the Inreach.
That's terrible, I am sorry to hear about it and thankful I haven't had such an experience. I always take the usual precautions with my vehicle, but many times it is sitting there 5-8 days so it is susceptible. I guess I have just been lucky. It is probably safer at locations such as Little Tupper which has the headquarters right there.
 
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Having the two way texting SPOT X worked for me. In the past I carried a one way SPOT messenger, but these days that two way messaging of the SPOT X turned out to be a great way to stay in touch with my wife and kids.
I'm going to be part of a moose hunt in northern Maine in October and again that SPOT X will ad an extra feeling of security to all involed, in the woods and those at home.
I used to have a SPOT but wasn't aware they had superdutied SPOT X. Good to know.
 
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Difficult whitewater and flood conditions have made me nervous many times, mostly I fear for the crew that may not have quite enough experience. It is the safety of other people that has always concerned me most. Besides drowning, health issues, an axe in the foot, falls, that kind of stuff. I finally gave up larger groups.

We have pulled up to a nice beach plenty of times full of bear tracks. I just find another spot. My dogs have been good about chasing bears. I carry firearms as a last resort. We see few reptiles in the West most of the time.

Predators are around. I have heard a mountain lion on a canoe trip. Packs of coyotes are of no concern at all. Wild donkeys walk past camp. Once you do it enough times canoe trips are not that scary.
 
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@Black_Fly I agree with your first two but...
1. I don't paddle with a dog
2. I don't really worry about failing, I've had a few trips that I failed to complete the paddle/hike as planned.
Regroup, Adapt, Overcome because it's all about spending time in the Backcountry. I look for bailout points in the planning of my trips
 
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My worst fear, WAVES. My second worst fear, vehicle vandals. Number three would be falling. Number four, running out of dog food.

Close to my list but in a different order....

1 - Falling
2 - Waves
3 - Getting my down sleeping bag wet
4 - What I will find at the takeout (especially when expecting to catch a train or plane)
5 - My paddling partner running out of food supply for HIS dog
6 - Running out of cigarettes (it happened ONCE)


Of the 6 the only one that instills actual high level fear is waves, solo paddling on a big open water crossings in high winds and waves are certainly the most dangerous situations I've ever been in while paddling. Made all that much worse because it can be continuous for a very long time with no chance for even a momentary pause in paddling while reading the waves as far away as you can trying to predict the actual moment they will arrive and from what direction. Tail winds especially can be unnerving.

Falling tops the list because it is present for more time than anything else (the time spent on land). I have osteoporosis (light), any very minor slip could bring an instant end to any trip. So far all the tripping fractures I've had (quite a few) were not bad enough to force an extraction, the same cannot be said for ice skating or the sidewalk outside my house and the stairs inside.
 
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In many of the deep swamps I've paddled, snakes unseen are a fear when getting out to set camp. It doesn't take me over or anything like that... but it is enough to make me cautious. And scared. A bit. ;)😱
 
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Close to my list but in a different order....

1 - Falling
2 - Waves
3 - Getting my down sleeping bag wet
4 - What I will find at the takeout (especially when expecting to catch a train or plane)
5 - My paddling partner running out of food supply for HIS dog
6 - Running out of cigarettes (it happened ONCE)


Of the 6 the only one that instills actual high level fear is waves, solo paddling on a big open water crossings in high winds and waves are certainly the most dangerous situations I've ever been in while paddling. Made all that much worse because it can be continuous for a very long time with no chance for even a momentary pause in paddling while reading the waves as far away as you can trying to predict the actual moment they will arrive and from what direction. Tail winds especially can be unnerving.

Falling tops the list because it is present for more time than anything else (the time spent on land). I have osteoporosis (light), any very minor slip could bring an instant end to any trip. So far all the tripping fractures I've had (quite a few) were not bad enough to force an extraction, the same cannot be said for ice skating or the sidewalk outside my house and the stairs inside.
I agree with #1, 4, and 6, mainly because they've happened to me... I don't have osteo, but I do have some old injuries that will haunt me for the rest of my life, and are very easy to re-injure, had my gas siphoned, and my car broke into, and lost all my smokes on day 2 of a 4 day trip.
 
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Especially solo, I fear dumping in whitewater or large lake waves, noises in the night, the prospect of tripping/falling, moose, night noises (I know I said it but it's worth repeating), getting hopelessly lost, etc.
 
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Fears: I guess getting a cut is supposed to be high on my list of carefulness, I’m still adjusting to my lack of healing itself now.

Does the person I’m with have an understanding of what to do in a heavy or serious situation?

If I stay a few more days, or a week, will my boss be mad?
 
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I use blood thinners now so carrying an axe is much less appealing.
I know the feeling, when I was on them even a shaving nick required bandaging to stop the bleeding. With so many of us aging it's starting to become a real issue, That's why I carry a surgical stapler, steri-strips and quick-clot now.
 
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Age as brought few maturity-related fears... if anything, I've realized I've lived to 57 even with a brain that sometimes tries to kill me. "Respect" is more the word... I have a greater respect for bears, bad weather, and the possibility of injury... all can be mitigated with proper planning, technique, clothing/eqpt, and caution. I do find myself being more cautious when i'm alone...

My wife worries that I'll trip and fall, or cut myself and bleed out 10 miles from anywhere... there was an excellent SPOT (and related devices) discussion here several years ago, and as I've edged into my 50s, I understand it more... courtesy to those we leave behind, who will worry regardless... so we reassure them with a daily msg. I don't, yet, but will eventually, i'm sure.
 
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Making bad decisions that have dire consequences. That's what I fear most.
That's interesting. From what I read most dire consequences are a result of three or more poor decisions. Each may not be serious but put them all together and you have trouble.

Like having to keep to a schedule Being late makes you in trouble.
Because you are late, you paddle in questionable conditions. You are late and make the most direct crossing. Sure enough you capsize
Your PLB or SPOT is in your pack and it sinks.

The above hypothetical but we all make small errors each trip and its my fear that I make unrecognized small errors that group up and cause trouble.
 
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Small stumbles and minor falls are first and foremost on my mind when I trip (no pun intended). What used to be seldom and inconsequential once upon a time has grown to be too frequent and resulting in aches and pains the past few years. Nothing yet severe but a warning sign for me to be more spatially aware and to focus on my balance too. Sounds like overthinking I know but I have in fact had some stupid close calls at home and at work. Reaching the wrong way and oops, there goes my back. Stepping off a step ladder thinking I was on the bottom step when I was in fact still 3 steps up, oops. Slow motion bicycling around a downed tree on the trail, no problem, except oops, down I go, damn that hurt. Nowadays I watch every step I take a little bit closer. Basement stairs. Pebbles on the pavement. Portage trail. I can no longer take a 20 year old body for granted because it left me 40 years ago and the one I have left is all I've got.
 
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...
Like having to keep to a schedule Being late makes you in trouble.
Because you are late, you paddle in questionable conditions. You are late and make the most direct crossing. Sure enough you capsize
Your PLB or SPOT is in your pack and it sinks.
...

That's spot on. I remember an Allagash ranger saying that when he hears the trip leader use the word "itinerary" he becomes concerned.
 
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