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Stambaugh Sailing Skiff Build in Virginia Mountains

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The title of this forum says it includes "other small boats if using wood, composite or other techniques applicable to canoes."

So, here is my thread on the WoodenBoat forum about building a 15 foot sailing skiff designed by naval architect Karl Stambaugh: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthr...ugh-Sailing-Skiff-Build-in-Virginia-Mountains

The boat is a 15 foot flat bottomed skiff for sailing and (sometimes) rowing. It is a Chesapeake Bay crabbing skiff modified for contemporary recreational use. I'm using lots of techniques transferable to canoe building, including: lofting, scarfing, and working with epoxy. I will put duplicate posts on this site from time to time, but since there are already 10 pages and two years' work on the WB forum, I won't go back to the beginning.

Hope you guys enjoy it!
 
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Too cool, Mr U.
I also built a sailboat, I dragged my feet for nearly 4 years, I think it took about 400 hours. Mostly because I spent too much time concerned about stuff that ended up as no concern at all...

 
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I have not updated in a while. To lay out the waterline, I made a water level using clear vinyl tubing.....

resized using water level.jpg

....then connected the dots using a piece of vinyl molding as a batten.

resized pam and batten.jpg

Warning! Do not use "permanent" double sided carpet tape to attach temporary battens to your hull! The stuff really is permanent. I had to do some scraping and then retouching of paint.

With the waterline painted, the boat looks like this:

resized waterline_02.jpg

Today, off to the lumber yard for sheer strake planks. (I really should have waited to paint until after installing sheer strakes.)

I made a lattice pattern for the sheer strakes (Mark I version shown).

sheer strake pattern_resized.jpg
 
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Hey U,
I had to look up what a sheer strake is...
My sailboat build was a dinghy, a term which I suppose applies to nearly any live ballsated small sailboat.
What makes your boat a skiff?
And how will the sails be rigged?
BTW, it does look very nice.
 
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A different and intriguing boat build, UC2.



Could you explain how this water level tube procedure works and why marking a waterline is important or useful.

A water level is really simple, Glenn. It's just a hose with one end fixed; in my first photo that's the tube with the blue tape. The water at the other end of the hose will always be at the same height as the water in the fixed end. Water levels are simple, inexpensive, and accurate. They do not depend on a line of sight (laser or string), and so will work around corners and other obstacles.

10M_Water_Level_Demo.jpg

Any boat has a depth at which the designer intended it to float with a typical load, and this is what the waterline marks. If the load is increased, the boat goes deeper into the water. (A heavily loaded canoe hits more rocks than an empty canoe.) Overloading the boat decreases freeboard and allows waves to come inside; in an extreme case overloading the boat makes it sink. An excessive load also makes the boat more difficult to maneuver.

waterline.png

The most accurate way to mark the actual waterline would be to put the boat in the water with an average load, then to jump in with my pencil. I couldn't wait until launching, which is still well into the future.

Instead, I measured the location of the waterline from the full size drawing (lofting) that was scaled up from the designer's plans. Lofting is a confusing process that results in confusing drawings, so let's not digress.

resized final lofting.jpg

Then I set a compass to measure from the bottom of the keel to the waterline, along the centerline of the stem. I arbitrarily added one inch, because on a small boat it looks funny if the marked waterline doesn't show above the water. The “WL+1” point on the stem was the datum for the water level.

resized compass and stem.jpg
 
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Stripperguy, this is a small unballasted boat, and so could be classified as a dinghy as well.

"Skiff" is a designation applied to various boats, but traditionally a skiff is a flat-bottomed rowboat. Webster's says:

"Middle English skif, from Middle French or Old Italian; Middle French esquif, from Old Italian schifo, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English scip ship"

A flat-bottomed boat is relatively easy to build. It has the advantage of shallow draft for working in skinny water. Generally flat bottomed boats do not handle rough conditions as well as round bottoms, so these boats are intended for use in protected waters. A flat bottomed boat has high initial stability but less ultimate stability, like a Grumman canoe. The sides of most skiffs flare outward to provide increased resistance to capsizing as the boat leans over.

This design is a traditional Chesapeake Bay crabbing skiff, modified for contemporary recreational use. Crabs live in shallow water and are most easily caught from a shoal draft boat. No Chesapeake waterman would row when the wind could do the work, so in pre-motorboat days these vessels were always equipped with one or more sails.

The rig is a Chesapeake "leg o' mutton" sail. It's a triangular sail that looks a lot like a contemporary fore-and-aft sail, but there are important differences. Note that there is not a conventional head-bonking boom, but instead a sprit part way up the mast. The piece of sail below the sprit applies tension and prevents the bottom of the sail from lifting as the wind increases. No additional rigging ("boom vang") is needed to prevent the upper part of the sail from spilling wind.

The sprit is fitted with a line called a "snotter." This piece of rigging must have been named by middle school boys. It has the same function as the outhaul on a conventional sail, enabling the sail to be flattened as the wind increases.

The leg o' mutton is a tall sail, which increases the ability to sail to windward. The tradeoff for this advantage is a long mast which cannot be stowed inside the boat.

sailingskiff_15.jpg
 

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