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In Canoe Storage

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I have been on several overnight kayak trips in the past and recently acquired a canoe. Only done 1 or 2 trips so far but I am liking the extra storage space.

However, I have been tossing around a bunch of different ideas on how to improve my Waterproof storage for my tent and bedding.

I was hoping to see what others have been using for bigger items that should be in a waterproof or at least water resistant container.

So far my ideas have been:
Waterproof totes, Like this one
Rooftop car bags. Like this one
Or the good old fashioned roll top dry bags

Has anyone used the above or otherwise have experimented with other options I have not yet considered?
 
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I just use a portage pack with liner. Never had anything get wet, including dumping in the Quetico in October, and taking a 1/2 hour to get to shore. Just fold liner carefully and pull straps on pack tight. That was three packs that survived fine, everything dry.
 
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Portage pack but I do put my quilt and backup clothing in a roll top bag in side the portage pack. For a wile I've been using a 12' pack boat in the beginning I use a north face buffle bag to keep every thing in. But could quickly get various bags out for bow weight or food water etc. So with that set up a roll top was nessery. Now I guess its insurance???
 
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To make things simple I only keep the stuff that must stay dry in waterproof packs, everything that can get wet I don't worry about. For the things that must stay dry I use double protection I line my sleeping bag and clothes stuff sacks with a plastic bag and then put these in a waterproof pack, either a roll top or usually a plastic lined Duluth pack. Whatever system you use it's good insurance to have double protection.
 

Glenn MacGrady

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I have been on several overnight kayak trips in the past and recently acquired a canoe.
Welcome to site membership, Saint! Feel free to keep asking questions and to post messages, photos and videos on our many canoe-related forums. We look forward to hearing about your new journey into canoes and to your participation in our community.

I've always used canvas Duluth packs with waterproof liners. Originally I used the large, thick plastic bag liners that Duluth Pack sells.


Later, I bought breathable eVent roll-top liners, no longer sold by Granite Gear.

Duluth Packs would now be too expensive for me. However, there's no reason their reasonably priced plastic liners, which are a lot more waterproof and puncture proof than garbage bags, couldn't be used in any large fabric pack.

Many canoeists use plastic blue barrels, often available used for cheap prices. A search of this site will turn up many threads and posts about blue barrels. They do need some sort of carrying harness if you are going to portage them.
 
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Originally I used the large, thick plastic bag liners that Duluth Pack sells.

Are these thicker than trash compactor bags? Those are what I use, and they're pretty inexpensive.
And like others have said, stuff that must stay dry (sleeping bag, primarily) gets put into it's own roll top bag, and then into the pack.
 

Glenn MacGrady

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Are these thicker than trash compactor bags?
Don't know because I don't have a trash compactor. The Duluth pack liners are definitely stronger than the average garbage bag, which some paddlers use, and have the benefit of being transparent (or used to be).
 
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The poly-pack liners Glenn just posted are 6 mils - I just checked. I have purchased 6 mil industrial garbage bags. Pretty cheap per unit, but I've only found them packaged for industry. Still worth it, I think.

I use the 6 mil garbage bags and put it all into roll top dry bags.

I keep it simple too, but opposite of lowangle al - I put everything in dry bags. The reason for this is simplicity, but also I have been on trips with lots of rain and it gets really tiresome to haul around wet gear.
 
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