How to empty a swamped canoe from the water!

Joined
Jun 12, 2012
Messages
3,667
Location
Appleton, Maine
I watched this and kept trying to see if they where standing on the bottom of the pond. Not so, they actually flipped that canoe up out of the water while swimming. Pretty impressive.
Now, to do it in waves with some gear either stuck inside, footwear on, gear floating away, trying to get back in with the waves that knocked you out in the first place, wind pushing the canoe........

But still impressive, Thanks for the link.
 
G

Guest

Guest
I recently saw a black and white vintage clip of a solo canoer that once swamped took a grip on the gunnel of one side of the canoe and rocked it up and away from him there by each time dumping a little more water out of the canoe on his side and finally he had it emptied out.

Doug
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
483
Location
Ontario
I recently saw a black and white vintage clip of a solo canoer that once swamped took a grip on the gunnel of one side of the canoe and rocked it up and away from him there by each time dumping a little more water out of the canoe on his side and finally he had it emptied out.

Think that was the 1939 Reg Blomfield video that yellowcanoe orginally posted HERE. He sure made it look easy. I was wondering if the flared hull design of his all-wood Peterborough style canoe helped to splash out all that water. I've practiced with side to side splashing thing on my cedar canvas and couldn't effectively empty the boat with all that tumblehome.

For a real hoot, check out this canoe emptying advice from Popular Science, Sept. 1938. The cartoon demonstration on the lower left mentions standing on the stern to lift out the bow and then acrobatically kicking out the canoe to splash out most of the water. Easier to draw than perform, I think



Pop+Science+-+Sept+1938.jpeg
 
L

lynxcarl

Guest
This flip can also be accomplished, similarly, from outside of the canoe, with a swimmer/paddler at each end. It's easier to push up with arms closer together, than with them splayed across 30-35," the beam of the canoe.
 
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