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How do you manage your camera while canoeing?

Since the cell phone camera has evolved as far as it has, I no longer carry a separate camera. I kept my camera in a little holster, either on my belt or hooked on some thick wires on the thwart. I keep my phone in my left breast pocket while underway, and in my right cargo pocket while portaging.

I bought a leash for it on Amazon so I don't lose it if I drop it in the water. If it's raining, I have a small plastic bag to keep it in, though nothing will prevent it getting wet if I go over... that's sort of the drawback to photography... you need the camera handy, but keeping it safe is the opposite of keeping it handy. I risk on the handy side.
 
I’m having trouble figuring out a way that works well for me to manage my camera while canoeing. Partly that’s because I’m often paddling a tandem solo with two dogs in the boat. One of them tends to behave well, one of them is… less predictable.

My camera is small (Fuji X-T5 mirrorless) and quite water resistant, but time after time I find myself grabbing my iPhone to take photos instead. Maybe because I can just drop the phone onto my kneeling pad if the going gets exciting? Not sure.

How do you manage your (non-phone) cameras? Any and all advice welcome. Thanks!
This last summer I bought a small waterproof camera that I keep in a thwart bag, most of the time.
My other camera is a Sony 7 IIa, I keep it in a screw top petfood vault, or a bucket with a gamma seal lid, right in front of me.
 
I use a Canon point and shoot with a good zoom. It is about the size of an SLR with a standard lens.
I have a waterproof box that I found at Home Depot for about $15. It has long outlasted the more expensive Pelican that I started with. The box is on a lanyard connected to the thwart, before I get into the canoe.

Rule 1 - camera ALWAYS goes in box whenever I am getting in or out of the canoe.

While paddling, I clip the neck strap to my PFD with a small carabiner and let it dangle between my legs. The strap is shortened so that the camera isn't on the floor of the canoe.

Rule 2 - if in doubt, put the camera away.

I went 10 years before drowning my first camera - I had broken rule 1.
I tried a GoPro for video, but I thought it was too limited compared to my regular camera.
 
I rarely take photos these days but paddle with people that do. On our last trip last June on the Klamath River in high water there was barely time to take a drink of water.
 
I started using my iPhone to take pictures (also as a GPS and e-reader). I was deadly afraid to drop it into the drink when handling it in the canoe. The tether tabs pictured below have alleviated that fear. After several drop tests, I'm convinced the connection is plenty strong. It is also removable as it is placed behind the phone's case without adhesive. I have a few extras which I'd be happy to share.


Tether Tab 1.jpgTether Tab.jpg
 
I use a Canon point and shoot with a good zoom. It is about the size of an SLR with a standard lens.
I have a waterproof box that I found at Home Depot for about $15. It has long outlasted the more expensive Pelican that I started with. The box is on a lanyard connected to the thwart, before I get into the canoe.
Can you post a photo or link of that box? I recently bought a fat, zoomy point & shoot and I haven't yet figured out how to pack it.

Rule 1 - camera ALWAYS goes in box whenever I am getting in or out of the canoe.
Hear ya, most crashes occur during takeoff or landing. I actually lost my last camera in a whitewater dump, but that'll never happen again ...
 
Can you post a photo or link of that box? I recently bought a fat, zoomy point & shoot and I haven't yet figured out how to pack it.


Hear ya, most crashes occur during takeoff or landing. I actually lost my last camera in a whitewater dump, but that'll never happen again ...
I searched around and that particular box doesn't seem to be available. I've had it for 10 years. It's nothing special, just a stiff hinged box with a rubber seal and a hefty latch. I glued a block of closed cell foam inside with a slots for an extra battery and memory card. Glued some cordura to the outside to hold my journal.
My previous Pelican box was good except the latches both broke - guess I put my camera away more than they planned....it didn't seem to make much sense to warranty something that would just break again, and again.
 
I’m having trouble figuring out a way that works well for me to manage my camera while canoeing. Partly that’s because I’m often paddling a tandem solo with two dogs in the boat. One of them tends to behave well, one of them is… less predictable.

My camera is small (Fuji X-T5 mirrorless) and quite water resistant, but time after time I find myself grabbing my iPhone to take photos instead. Maybe because I can just drop the phone onto my kneeling pad if the going gets exciting? Not sure.

How do you manage your (non-phone) cameras? Any and all advice welcome. Thanks!
Having dropped one camera in the water, I've used a Seal Line Hip Pack and DiCAPac WP-570 Waterproof Case with my Sony RX100 ever since.
 

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it didn't seem to make much sense to warranty something that would just break again, and again.
Yes. I always get a kick out of the question: "would you like to buy an additional warranty on that" during checkout. Honestly, if the item turns out to be below expectations, the last thing I want is another just like it.

As for the camera: I now carry two point & shoots, neither of which is waterproof. One is usually in the pack, sometimes in a drybag, often not. The other is typically on the floor of the canoe within easy reach. Well, maybe not right ON the floor... to keep it dry, it's often elevated by sitting on my tackle bag or pfd. It gets stored away also if it's raining (or, at least, raining hard enough that I feel it may be damaged). In the event that I would dump, the loose camera is probably gone but, on any normal trip, I'll lament the loss of the sd card more than the loss of the camera itself.
 
For much of our paddling career, Kathleen and I both carried SLR/DSLR cameras. In the bow, Kathleen kept hers in a waterproof Ortlieb pannier. In the stern, I kept mine in a Pelican case, with cutouts for the camera, telephoto lens, wide angle lens, and various filters. We always tripped with a spray cover beneath which we could jam the Ortlieb and Pelican against other gear Immediately in front of our respective positions. This made the cameras somewhat quickly accessible while paddling. We never bothered tying in the Ortlieb or Pelican case, and never had a problem. We used this approach for nearly 30 years. The Ortlieb is still waterproof. I have replaced the gasket in the Pelican case once.

It has been interesting to read about all the varied approaches here.
 
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