bill mason stove

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While up in Maine last week I came across two well traveled fellows who were cooking on a fire box as illustrated in Mason's "Song of the Paddle". They had two sizes and said they were still available & swore by them, but I cannot find the source online . Anyone have a lead on these ?
 
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We use fire box on all our trips. The one we use is a medium long and it is good for 2 big pots, or a big pot ad a frying pan! We get them from this place http://www.canoemapscanada.com/our-products/2015-02-07-14-21-04/environmental-fireplace.html
My wife teach a grade 10 outdoor head program and they use the same one. They are a bit on the heavy side, but super robust and the last a long time!!
The advantages of the fire box over the open fire(fire pit) are numerous, first you use way less wood, second even in high wind, the fire is under your pots where you want it! Third, they leave almost no trace, they have double bottom, so the scorching of the ground below is very limited( unless you camp at the same place for multiple days, in that case I either move the boxe everyday or I elevate it on some rocks). If you travel with kids, they are a bit safer than an open fire since they are a relatively more controllable!!

Anyway, we are sold out on these things as you can see:)
 
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I think the one I mentioned is the same one Canotrouge mentioned , it's called the Environmental fireplace. I never really used mine, probably because at the time I got it I was still taking a two burner coleman, but it did work well.
 
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I'll try to take a picture of all the various models I have side by side. The sun has returned after more than a week of greyness so more chance of a decent picture.
 
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The Nomads work well...I have one of his and a larger one of my own. I just dont really dig twig stoves. His small one makes a good base for an alchohol stove.
 
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Last time I checked Ric was unable to get the Egyptian cotton, maybe thats changed. I would consider selling mine for $15,000.00 US plus a fully restored Chestnut Prospector, my choice of color. Umm, maybe not.:D

Last time i check he was using Etha-proof. But he might not be able to get ti anymore! I would love him to up date his site and state the fabric use!!
 
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I know these discussions are old but has anyone tried the 180 stove from Piragis ? only $40.00 I 've cooked over lots of campfires but not twig stoves . Enlighten me... Jackpine Jerry
 
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Twig stove is a bit of a misnomer if you have the larger models. They can take some pretty large pieces. The thing is though that you want to regulate the fire a bit for even heating so the thumb sized sticks work well. You can find fuel almost anywhere and really dont need an axe to spllit it. You can even stop at your local beaver lodge and liberate nice dry wood as required.

For me, the only reason I dont use twig stoves is they sit on the ground and I hate bending over to cook. I take a two burner coleman and a stand so I can cook in a relatively civilised manner. If I am going to cook on the ground then this would be good. Karin does have a smallish model to use as a base for her trangia alchohol stove and that is rather slick as in a pinch it can be a dual use kind of thing.

No matter who makes it, they all pretty much follow the nomad concept with an open front to feed in fuel and a serrated top edge to allow air flow. Very simple and effective. We have tried a couple of different styles of twig stove and I like the nomad best. The Piragis one does not have a floor plate so that complicates matters when the fire danger is high. You would do just as well with rocks and a grill.

Christy
 
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Thanks for the info. I'm actually getting tired of bending over too. The lack of a bottom plate makes sense too.
 
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If you are wanting to elevate your twig stove I would suggest using some some form of insulating mat, maybe a piece of welding blanket or carbon felt, topped by a sheet of aluminum flashing on top of a barrel or wanigan box. As long as you use a stove with a floor raised off the ground (like mine on canoepaddler.net) this will be heat resistant enough to fend off any radiant heat generated by the stove. We use something similar in our winter hot tent to stop the snow beneath the stove from melting. A stove with out the air space below the floor (or no floor at all) would require something more robust.

You also look on the web for a small collapsible aluminum table to set on top of the barrel.
 
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Yeah - this is an old thread, I apologize if this sort of thing is frowned upon...

There's this super laid-back guy from Ontario - James Carey - who has a youtube channel covering his various outdoor pursuits. He fashioned a portable wood stove from an old cash box:

 
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