Beef jerky

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The last of the beef jerky is in the dehydrator awaiting retrieval. It's the best yet - half beef tenderloin and half eye of round roast. I don't spice it up much, but this time I added some hoisin sauce. Yum. It'll be good lunch on my next Boundary Waters trip in a few weeks. I'll post the recipe if asked.
 
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Jerky is great stuff. We used to make it at Dad's ranch in Arizona. Butcher a young heifer in the front yard, brine the thin strips of meat and then hang them under the eaves of the house in the fall at 7,000 feet. There were no insects and few birds. Buffalo and elk make the best jerky.

Snapper,
For historic canoeing do you bring parched corn, pemmican, bannock and rababoo?
 
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I've made several versions of pemmican, including using black cherries and bone marrow. I find that jerky is more palatable and much lower in fat. Here's the decidedly non-historic marinade recipe (enough for 5-10 lbs of meat):

1 cup Worcestershire sauce
3/4 cup soy lite sauce
5 tbsp. Liquid Smoke
3 tbsp. Cholula
1 tbsp. Montreal steak seasoning
4 tbsp. Hoisin sauce
3 cup. water

Marinate in refrigerator overnight.
Dehydrate at 155-165*F for 8-12 hours.
Try to resist the temptation to over-sample when testing doneness and afterwards.
 
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I just talked to my neighbor yesterday. It is antelope season and he is on the trail of a giant 18 inch buck.That would make some great jerky too. We are getting ready for the 150th Birthday Party for the State of Nevada this Nov. and we will need to come up with some traditional foods.
 
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Gavia - Thanks for posting your recipe. I'll have to give it a try!

ppine - Sorry I didn't get back until right now. The re-enacting I typically do is from the French side of things in the French & Indian War and a bit earlier in the last 2 decades of the 17th century. Typically we eat a lot of peas w/ ham, cheese and bread, washed down with an occasional cup of brandy (yum!). When out for multi-day trips in this pursuit we'll add jerky, dried sausages, apples, onions, dried cranberries w/ chocolate bits and some type of oatmeal. Add in some tea, or make sumac lemonade/tea when in season, and you've pretty much covered the bases. I have brought parched corn in the past but prefer to each the dried cranberries mixed w/ choc bits as my trail snack. Both were available so they're period correct foods for my neck of the woods.

That's all for now. Take care and until next time...Be well.

snapper
 
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snapper,
I used to hang around with buckskinners (Fur Trade Era) emulating 1810-1840. There is nothing like a National Western Rendezvous. One year there was a guy selling buffalo meat out of the back of an old freight wagon with a 2 up of Belgian draft horses. I was very interested in the voyageurs prior to our BWCA trip. I like to hear the echoes of those that came before us. It adds an extra dimension to any canoe trip. I have really enjoyed reading the journals of Lewis and Clark on the upper Missouri and JW Powell on the Green R in Utah. Sometimes we used the same campsites.

Jerky is a great way to preserve meat and it works for nearly any mammal that is palatable.
 
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