appomattox river company??

Joined
Nov 29, 2012
Messages
453
Location
southwest Indiana
I know of a couple of folks who have ordered Esquif whitewater canoes through them and seemed well-satisfied. I have not done business with them myself.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2013
Messages
13
Location
VA
great company, Well pleased with a kayak I bought from them. I bought mine over the phone and picked up later, I got a 10% discount just for asking. I found out they will work with you. But I did sell the Kayak and added a canoe.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2014
Messages
142
Location
minnesota
One concern of mine if I was to order online, I would want the newest model. In other words, I dont want one thats been sitting around for 5 years, and since then, the model has changed a bit. Looking at pictures of canoes, I've noticed there are things the manufacturer changes throughout the years.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2011
Messages
6,389
Location
Raymond, ME
I would order on the phone and first before handing over financials ask for the last two numbers on the hull. That is the year of manufacture. Some things I believe should not be ordered by "adding to cart"

Get in touch with a real person and ask questions of them.
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2011
Messages
425
Location
Maryland, USA
Actually the last 2 digits of the hull identification number notes the model year which by regulation changes in August. The 3rd number from the end is the build year. For example if they are 414 the hull was built in 2014 and is a 2014 model. If it is 314 it was built in 2013 and is a 2014 model. The letter just preceding the last 3 numbers indicate the month it was built -- A for Jan, B for Feb, C for Mar etc. So H314 was built in Aug of 2013.
 
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Guest

Guest
One concern of mine if I was to order online, I would want the newest model. In other words, I dont want one thats been sitting around for 5 years, and since then, the model has changed a bit. Looking at pictures of canoes, I've noticed there are things the manufacturer changes throughout the years.

I may be taking the bait here, but on some (many) newer model poly canoes, and even on some newer versions of older models, those changes were driven more by ease of assembly profit margins and less to make the canoe more functional for the paddler.

Mind the hook. I don’t know when OT and MRC began putting excessive plastic seats/seat backs on models that once had wood frame seats, but the later are far superior for a number of reasons.

More bait – I doubt you’ll find a 5 year old poly boat at any big box that rolls them out the door by the dozens. I doubt you would find one new even at a paddleshop. Nor a “new” 5-year old Royalex canoe; that would be a rare find, with better quality RX that had a few years to fully cure.

Last nibble. If you are deadset on buying the latest and (maybe not) greatest inexpensive poly canoe you’ve heard some consistent opinion about your choices. Find the best price you can and order one. You’ll have a boat. It will get you out on the water and you’ll figure out what works for you and what doesn’t.

And a strike! If you can wait a few weeks the offer to have a bunch of snowed in paddlers help you look used in your area stands, just give us a location.

A thread about the relative merits and asking prices of used boats in your area has the potential to be educational. Or at least entertainingly biased.

I enjoy casting lures or bait, or even trolling, and if fishing is your predominate use one of those canoes will get you some action.
 
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Guest

Guest
Back to the original question.

http://www.paddleva.com/

They’ve been around for years. They have multiple locations. They have survived recent downturns. They must be doing something right.

They have a good selection of canoes and are not just a niche shop (sea kayak, whitewater, fishing, whatever). Real paddleshops are becoming rare gems.

If you are near enough to Appomattox there are many benefits to purchasing a canoe from a paddleshop. The people taking to you there know a lot more about canoes (and accessories) than the pimply faced kid at Dicks and can actually help you access your needs.

A reputable paddleshop wants to sell in the right boat for you, not just whatever the stockroom or next shipment has available. They want you to come back for your next boat, and before that for additional kit along the journey.

A brick & mortar store provides a real live person to talk, with actual canoes to look at and touch and ask about, not just fantastical website prose and a photograph.

Keep them in business and they’ll be there in the future as an actual person - usually a paddling enthusiast - and not just a voice on the phone with a Bangladesh accent when you look for the next canoe or piece of gear.

Paddleshops stay in business with sales of gear, not boats. Especially anything you want to get up close and personal with, try on, touch, feel or hold in hand – PFD’s, paddles, fishing accessories. Dry bags, map cases, paddling shoes. Those are also the things that folks don’t typically buy used.

Whatever canoe you buy you’ll probably be back to buy gear before you buy the next boat.
 
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