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    What's in a name?
    Rocking in the kitchen this morning after my wife left for work listening to some Hip sipping my coffee when I looked up and saw a cookbook title that stirred my memory. Up on the busy book shelf above the pantry cupboard is a gem, so I pulled it out and leafed through the pages till I came to what mattered. Name Days.
    Name days are celebrated in some cultures rather than birthdays, particularly if the person shares their name with a celebrated saint; it may also mark the day you were initiated into a pagan group and took a new name. This book Celtic Folklore Cooking by Joanne Asala provides over 200 traditional recipes as well as food-related proverbs, poems, tales, and customs. She who must be baked for doesn't share her name with any saint nor are we pagan celebrants (most of the time), but her name does have meaning: in Latin it means Worthy Of Admiration, Wonderful. Yes, I can't argue with that. So some name day baking is now nearing completion for when she gets home, a Nut Loaf and Scones. Hope she thinks them wonderful for her birthday tomorrow.
    I read we are under the Hawthorn Moon in April, so it's the time for fertility, happiness, prosperity, and peace both inner and external.
    Last edited by Odyssey; 05-14-2020, 07:17 AM.

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      nut loaf?
      "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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        Ha, yeah. Pecans. Just to spoil her I'm doing a Burnt Sugar Cake also with pecans. Can you have too many fertility symbols in spring?

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          We have a couple of NUT LOAFS here, starring at each other across the vast expanse of our small living room.

          I am reading Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson. I have found that I like history, wish that Mr. Thompson from my high school days hadn't been so boring in having us just memorize a bunch of dates. The only thing I remember him telling us was about a trip where he saw some petrified Dinosaur eggs, he pronounced dinosaur wrong, probably the only reason I remember that.
          Last edited by Boreal Birch; 04-24-2020, 02:39 PM.
          "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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            I'm not one to normally read science fiction but decided to read Dune. I believe it was originally intended as a trilogy and that's probably where I'll stop (recently started the 3rd book). It's good. Not what I expected.

            Alan

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              I’ve been enjoying several of the “how to camp” books written in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Currently reading Camping and Woodcraft by Horace Kephart. Really interesting to relate to what is relevant and roll your eyes at how things should be done. Some things never change. Except some of the gear- Can’t imagine walking around in boots with nails through the soles!

              Bob

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                Ok, I'll chime in here.
                One that I recently finished, and almost made me want to get a canvas canoe - Canoe Trails & Shop Tales, written by a local guy, Hugh Stewart. A mix of some early days in Temagami, some of his longer canoe trips, and about building boats. Will likely buy another one of his books next time we're at the Wakefield farmer's market.
                Roy MacGregor's Canoe Country. Some interested stories canoe.
                Bush Runner - a good one, though it did take me a while to read it, some great stories about Radisson's life in Canada and around the world in the 1600's.
                Nahanni Remembered- for those of you into books about the Nahanni, this is a good one about a guy who went up there in the 1930's to trap for the winter and then floated down on a log raft.
                One that I haven't heard mentioned, but is a great read - The Emerald Mile - part history book of humans in the Grand Canyon, partly a telling of the fastest rafting trip down the Grand Canyon during the flood of 1983. Great book.
                The Mad Trapper - a fictionalized account of the RCMP chasing Albert Johnson over 50 days in the NWT in the early 1930's
                The Monkey Wrench Gang - Edward Abbey - saving the wilderness!
                Water - by Mark deVilliers - water issues and challenges around the world
                To Save the Wild Earth - Ric Careless - about the environmental campaigns to save some great Cdn wilderness areas - Tatshenshini, Spatsizi, Purcell Mtns, and other areas, mostly in BC.
                Finally, for today, one I read during the Covid lockdown, Shake Hands with the Devil - Gen. Dellaire's struggle to stop the genocide in Rwanda

                happy reading!
                rab

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                  Lots of good titles there rabb, thanks for those.

                  In this time of distancing it may be difficult for some to access books. Aside from the hardcover & softcover kind here at home I also read online.
                  I stumbled across a writer during a recent internet ramble, Stewart Edward White, and American writer (12 March 1873 – September 18, 1946).
                  He wrote fiction and non-fiction from 1900 to 1922, often about adventure and travel with a particular interest in natural history and outdoor living.
                  Here's a list available from the Project Gutenberg free ebooks. http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/author/247
                  I'll likely read The Forest and Camp And Trail together. Both books contain his musings devoted to canoe travels.
                  Happy reading.
                  Last edited by Odyssey; 05-15-2020, 01:28 PM.

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                    Reading "Undaunted Courage" by Stephen Ambrose for the third time. Each reading uncovers more of the truth about the Lews & Clark Expedition.
                    It is June 1806 and the boys have just crossed the Bitteroot Mtns with the help of the Nez Perce. Now they are preparing to head down the Missouri and the Yellowstone Rs.
                    Forester

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