Walleye

Joined
Jan 30, 2013
Messages
53
I wanted to ask, what is a keep, it simple way to try to catch a walleye, out of my canoe. We have a lake near our place, never caught one always did trout on creeks. Looks like minnows hook em, slowly paddle? Thoughts? Best to you and yours; Ravenwolf;
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Messages
459
Location
Dodgeville, Wi
OK, first off, what lake? Walleye are not in every lake and depending on the size and bottom structure, technique can vary considerably.

Also time of year and wind/sun conditions can make a difference.

That said, I think the easiest way to catch walleyes is to troll with deep diving cranks, like a Walleye Diver or Rapalla. If Northerns are around, it is ok to use a leader when trolling, but for anything finesse, stay with line directly tied to tackle. 6 to 8 pound test is ideal. Once you find the fish with the cranks, drift, vertical jig with jig and plastics. I almost never use live bait ... it does work, but I generally have no use for it. However, minnows and leeches on a slip bobber can be excellent when things slow down.

Bob.
 
Joined
Aug 12, 2012
Messages
310
Location
Illinois
If you want simple I will share my secret weapon for Walleye. I am not much for fishing so when I can't get Bob B.or Harlan to come along as our "go to" fisherpersons I get my secret out. I cast my "Hot Pink Daredevl" way behind the canoe and paddle slowly and enjoy the scenery. When the pole bends back I reel in supper. If I am on a Walleye Lake it will usually be a Walleye.:p
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
3,457
In the spring, concentrate on areas of the lake where there might be flowing water, such as the mouth of rivers. If you anchor and cast around these areas with a jig and a minnow, you will do well. When you retrieve your line, use a classic "jigging" motion, snapping the tip of your rod as you reel.

When i fish on our lake in town, I use minnows. When we go to the more remote places on a canoe trip, we just use rubber tails on jigs. Sometimes the wallies are so thick, we just drop our lines over the side.

If you are using a jig, and casting, keep it right on bottom as well.

One thing about rapalla's and such not. If you are inexperienced with pike, you might want to pass on the treble hooks. Pike will almost always be in the same water as walleye, and they cannot resist a crank bait. Getting a couple of sets of treble hooks out of pike can result in some interesting human hookings. I never use treble hooks up here, but I don't like pike. I know a lot of Americans do. Pike can also be had with a jig, just real faster, the walleye will usually avoid a fast moving jig and the pike will nail it.

I usually crimp my barb if a lot of pike are around, I don't want their slimy bodies stinking up my canoe, it's nice just to be able to do a quick release in the water.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2013
Messages
53
THANKS, the story is there is a self sustaining population of walleye. I live near Gettysburg, and the lake is a man made water which is used for drinking water. Electric motor only, fishing will be a second event, as enjoying the canoe will be the main focus. But I hope to try catch some. Build a snowman, before its to late. Ravenwolf .
 
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Ravenwolf, you've been given great advice. Apply it. I'd only add one thing, which is that light line (I use 6 pound test.) with a light hook and the smallest possible splitshot sinker is very hard to outfish. I just hang it over the side of my canoe and drift. The bites tend to be light, so keep your eye on the road tip and set the hook if it looks different and hang onto your rod, as I've lost a couple when I was distracted and the fish managed to hook themselves.
 
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