The ultimate pond hopping tandem?

G

Guest

Guest
I posted this on the ADK forum and got some ideas. I figure I'll put it here for fun:

Although I like both my boats, I don't consider them to be the best choice for the Adirondacks and the places I like to go and want to go with my boat.

My wife and I both thought we'd make the plunge to pack canoes but have decided although the weight and size is right, they just aren't for us. We both have different reasons why but let's assume that a double blade boat with a floor seat isn't an option.

Those of us who frequent this forum know of Conk and his bushwhacking Curtis Mayfly, and those of us who have read back know that is not the boat he started with.

While I do not have the aspirations of the Conk, both the wife and I want to go farther, and do more in park.

At the moment, my wife is not interested in learning to solo single blade. I wish she were because it would simplify my life, but it just is what it is. She will also not tolerate me running off with my own solo boat...

Money aside, what options would be the best for medium to small water and long ports in the park? Also assume we want to sit up (my wife likes to be able to see into the water, a major complaint of the pack canoe) and propel ourselves with a single blade stick.

The ideal boat would be as light as possible yet rugged and able to carry up to 500 lbs efficiently. Size is also a concern because some of the places I've hiked, but not taken the boat, but would like to, involve potential blowdown, encroaching vegetation, muddy trails and difficult log bridges.

For those that don't know, we have the Keewaydin 16 in Kevlar Fusion. The weight is good, but lighter would be better. The size is OK, but possibly a 15' and slightly narrower hull would be better? Possibly trade off a little hull efficiency for weight and compactness?

Sorry for the long-winded request. But I am serious about paddling in the park. We have another boat that does fine for big lakes and short ports... but can any other boat meet our needs better than our current?

Thanks!

So far the top contenders are:

1) My current Keewaydin - net cost $0
2) A Carbon Fusion Keewaydin which could shave some weight - $3500! Ouch! Plus concerns about durabiltiy
3) A Bell Morningstar in ? layup and trim - whatever one is the one that weighs 36 lbs provided I could even find one for sale - I'm guessing $1500-1700?
4) A Hemlock Eaglet in which I beg and plead with the builder to outfit the 35 lb solo version with lightweight yoke and dual seats - $3500+ Ouch again!
5) A Colden Starfire which YC and I have already argued about but I'll leave as an option - No idea...
6) A Swift Prospector 15 Kevlar with Carbon trim (35 lb) - probably a decided decrease in performance - $3250
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 1, 2013
Messages
3,458
That Swift prospector looks to be a Prospector in name only. One inch of rocker and pretty sharp tumblehome by the looks of the dimensions. Sure is light in the carbon fusion. If you buy it, or even test paddle it, I would like a review. If it wasn't for the weight, I would suggest the Nova Craft Pal...looks like the lightest weight they have there is 44 pounds.
 
G

Guest

Guest
The "Bob Special" actually looks pretty good. 15' and 40lbs. Can't compete with the Swifty but on a budget it might be a good boat.
 
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
1,819
Location
Schenectady, NY
l'oiseau,

Have you considered something like this?

DSC_8162.JPG


The boat on the left is my nephew's recreation of my 17 ft tandem. His came out heavy -- 41 lb -- and cost him about $500 to build.
That hull is my design, and it has proven to handle all of the ADK waters that I have paddled, and I have been around a bit.
If you say that it's too heavy, to that I say, I'll send you my drawing files and you scale them down to 15 ft or so...you're a sharp guy, do the math and see what it could weigh. For another benchmark, the same hull that I built 30 years ago weighed 38 lbs. That hull handled big swells on Cranberry, twisty turns on Shingle Shanty, and kept up with all of the modern commercial hulls. And, you gotta admit, it's easy on the eyes. And no fear of a few scratches, you've seen my other posts, so you know the abuse that these things can withstand.

So let's see...lightweight, durable, seaworthy, manueverable, quiet, efficient, low cost... What's stopping you?? And don't say you don't have the time, it could take as little as 50 hours, a little here, a little there. Maybe you and the little lady could do it together, shared projects are great fun.
 
G

Guest

Guest
SG,

I knew you would say that because I have been thinking it since my first post... I know a 15' stripper could be built to meet all those requirements. And sure I could do all the calcs. It is the woodwork I am concerned with.

I wonder what Conk would charge me to build a boat? I doubt he is interested though... but man I've seen his and they are nice!
 
G

Guest

Guest
Our packs with food for 4 days and three nights weigh about 25-28lbs each. We are pretty spartan.

I should add we each carry only one pack. No barrels. No wanigans. No coolers. No beer.

The only additional mass that goes in the ship is boots, and they go on our feet for ports and light water shoes go on our backs.

I think you guys that aren't familiar with the Adirondacks need to realize there are sometimes ports as long as the paddles in the Adirondacks, at least in the outback areas. The big, Canadian Tripper style lakes are all developed... and you can cover the whole park in 3 days like that.

Most people paddle around in these little 'wee lassie' type boats:

6a00e5519ea7d28834016767b71532970b-800wi
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
691
Location
Western Adirondacks
If you are considering a stripper but don't want to take the time to build it yourself, consider contacting Pat Brown. He builds tandems and guideboats for a price that is much more reasonable than you might think. Several of his boats have won first place in the Adirondack 90 Miler, yet they are functional and recreational friendly. Pat lives at Upper Chase Lake, not far from Lowville on the western edge of the Adirondacks. Phone 315-376-5935. He'll spend the day with you if you have the time, and you can take as much time as you want to try boats on the nearby lake.

Here is a news article featuring Pat:
http://www.watertowndailytimes.com/article/20101023/CURR04/310239918
 
Last edited:
Top