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foot bar

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The footbrace in my Wenonah Prism was mounted on two rails attached to the hull. That arrangement allowed it to be moved fore and aft.
 
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I know the thread is kind of old.... where do these braces usually land vertically, in relation to the seat height?
 
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On my Swift solo, measuring down from the top of the gunwales, to the top of the curved seat is 2 1/4" and 5 1/2" to the top of the foot brace. The center of the rail is another 1".
 
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I know the thread is kind of old.... where do these braces usually land vertically, in relation to the seat height?

I don't think there should really be any relation to seat height. Your heels are on the floor and the balls of your feet should be on the brace, seat height shouldn't really affect this. Measurements should be from the floor. I'll measure mine later when I'm out in the shop.

Alan
 
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I just sat in my canoe and made a mark about where the balls of my size 11 bare feet reached the sides of the boat.

I installed the foot brace in my Sojourn shortly after this thread was last abandoned. I used mini-cell foam spacers in the manner shown in the photo Glenn posted, attached with contact cement. Weldwood makes a water based contact cement, which I did not use, and the more noxious version that I did use - which holds up quite well in canoes. My foot bar has only been in the boat for about a year, but I have knee pads installed that canoe with contact cement that have been there a few years without problems - and in my Prospector for a lot longer.

My adjustable foot bar was constructed from parts rripped from cheap used aluminum crutches. The brackets are essentially just pieces of angled aluminum with holes drilled for lock pins. I made slotted plugs for the ends of the bar out of delrin rod. Those slide on the brackets and are drilled for the lock pins. Most of the material was stuff I had left over from other projects, so cost of this project was maybe about $40 (those stainless lock pins are expensive).
 
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Mine is 5 1/2" from the bottom of the canoe to the bottom of the bar, which is 1" tubing. I've used this height on a few boats now and like it for my size 11 feet.

First time I installed foot braces in a canoe they were way too high. I think I might have just measured from the back of my foot to the ball and installed them that high from the floor. Of course when you're sitting in a canoe with your feet on the bar they aren't straight up and down but angled, which means only my tippy toes hit the bar.

Alan
 
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You first have to decide which of two types of foot brace you want: foot pedals or a foot bar.

Foot pedals are used in kayaks and in most short pack canoes. Your feet are limited to being located against the hull, but there is room between the pedals for gear.

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Foot bars are used in most sit & switch marathon canoes. I chose the Wenonah black aluminum foot bar for my Hemlock SRT, which is mainly a kneeling canoe, because the bar can adjust to different lengths, it can be easily completely removed for gear or car topping, and I can put my feet anywhere along its length unlike a pedal brace. I also sometimes tie light gear to the foot bar and use it to rest my spare paddle. You can also put pipe insulation on it to make it softer on spare paddles or bare feet.

Both foot pedals and foot bars have tracks that you can glue in or rivet in. I chose to have my foot bar tracks screwed into pieces of ash, which were then epoxied onto the hull. It's lasted five years so far. I even keep screws, washers and nuts inside a small zip lock back inside the telescoping foot bar.

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At least one person contact cemented a Wenonah track onto a sliver of minicell foam, which he then contact cemented onto the hull. I have no idea how long this would last, but it would be easy to shave off.
Foam%2520Mount%2520Wenonah%2520Footbrace.jpg
I had Dave at Hemlock install the kayak braces on my Peregrine and found I don't like them. Looking to buy this Wenonah foot bar but can't find one to install in the Peregrine instead.
 
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I had Dave at Hemlock install the kayak braces on my Peregrine and found I don't like them. Looking to buy this Wenonah foot bar but can't find one to install in the Peregrine instead.
I think the Wenonah foot bars are unavailable due to supply chain issues. Just FYI Northstar recently started offering a more conventional sliding foot brace. I put one in my Magic last year using 3M adhesive that a canoe dealer recommended. It also comes with rivets. The footbrace brackets are already bent to an angle that helps them conform to the hull and the adhesive is easy to use so it was straightforward to install.
 

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I think the Wenonah foot bars are unavailable due to supply chain issues. Just FYI Northstar recently started offering a more conventional sliding foot brace. I put one in my Magic last year using 3M adhesive that a canoe dealer recommended. It also comes with rivets. The footbrace brackets are already bent to an angle that helps them conform to the hull and the adhesive is easy to use so it was straightforward to install.
I have the carbon one that I'm going to install in my NW Solo. Might order another for my Peregrine!
 
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