Adirondacks Whitney Wilderness Loop Fall 2021

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I just got back from a 5 day fall canoe trip that started 10/17 and ended on 10/21. I paddled the Whitney Wilderness Area loop from the Little Tupper Lake headquarters, traveling clockwise on the map and returning to the headquarters to complete the loop. Little Tupper Lake, Rock Pond, Hardigan Pond, Little Salmon Lake, Lilly Pad Pond, Shingle Shanty Brook, Lake Lila, Harrington Brook, Clear Pond, Bog Lake, Lows Lake, Bog River, Hitchen's Pond, continuing past Lows Lower dam on the Bog river, Bog Stream, Round Lake, and finishing at Little Tupper Lake.

The weather was chilly and wet generally, but I did get some sun on day 4. I also missed the Fall colors by about a week according to my Brother, who spent the previous week at Lake Placid with his wife RV camping and bike riding. I traveled with my 14 mo. old chessie Cricket who has never done a multi day trip and this was only her 5th time in the canoe. The last time I did this loop in its entirety was 2013 with a much more experienced 6 y.o chessie dog. Like much of the ADK's and North woods I've experienced, the terrain is hilly, wet, uneven terrain with intermittent wetlands (bogs), and the woods are thick with young pines. The water was cold and tannin stained.

Day 1
Due to my work requirements I had to alter the start time and left my home at about 1AM Sunday and was at the put-in at L Tupper Lake at 11 AM. The day prior I had taken Cricket on a fairly hard 8 mile hike in the mountains of PA in an attempt to curb her energy, but she slept most of the way North and at the put-in, was a powder keg of energy.
PA170003 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Cricket is about 68 lbs and 20 lbs. less than my previous chessie Copper. The canoe is a Bell Northstar and you can see I took the front seat out. This was the intended spot for Cricket, and is where Copper would be when traveling by canoe. As soon as we shoved off, it was apparent that this wasn't going to work trim wise and so for the rest of the trip, our gear, consisting of one portage pack and one 30L food barrel would reside all the way up front. Cricket was able to move between the kneeling thwart and forward thwarts. Cricket, as it turns out, probably wasn't quite ready for this trip. She wouldn't stop trying to get out of boat and so I had to be on my guard and was quite vocal with her. It didn't take long to realize that she needed to swim for a while. LTL is a fair size lake and she's a strong swimmer but it made me nervous as we crossed the first bay. She chugged along though and I kept looking back to offer words of encouragement. Looking at the map, I saw that there was a hiking trail that ran along the lake only a couple hundred feet from the shoreline so I decided that I would collect the dog back in the boat and head to the shore line and hop on the trail. It was safer and maybe it would burn off enough energy for her to relax. The trail was a nice trail and was also gave us the first of two bear sightings. On our way back to the canoe, I was throwing fetch sticks in the woods when Cricket let out an uncharacteristic growl and took off. I quickly saw that it was a bear that had wondered onto the trail in front of us. I called for Cricket who immediately came back. The bear continued to high tail it up the path in the direction we were traveling. I didn't get too many pics on Little Tupper Lake because I was managing the puppy.

A lot of the trees were stripped bare, but there were flashes of color all around to contrast with the pines:
PA170006 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Part of the trail not far from where we saw the bear:
PA170009 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

We stopped at about where site 12 would be and found that it had been shutdown for regeneration:
PA170013 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Back in the canoe and heading for the Rock Pond Carry. The weather was rather dreary and the rain came in fits and starts:
PA170016 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Getting back into the canoe, the hike did not help Cricket's demeanor. My goal was to get to Rock Pond for the first night and after more swimming and one short carry at the outlet, we were at Rock Pond. It had begun to rain as we reached site 30. The site sits up above the lake a bit and has a decent tent pad in a clearing just below the area where the fire ring is situated. I set up our CCS tarp near the fire ring so we had a place to eat and get dry. I set the tent on the pad down below. I was tired by the time it got dark from driving all night and ready for bed. Cricket was dry enough to be in the tent so we turned in. I had brought an MSR Hubba Hubba 2 man tent that I had never used....in fact it still had the tags on it from when I bought it several years ago. I did a dry run set up a couple days before the trip and the seam tape was suspect. I decided to bring my Big Agnes UL 2 person tent, but at the last second I decided to bring the MSR. Son of a bitch if I didn't wake up during a windy rain squall to find that the fly was leaking and my down quilt was getting wet. So I quickly got out of my sleeping clothes and put on damp paddling clothes and my head lamp and went outside. For some reason I also threw in my cuben fiber tarp into the kit at the last second. I figured at 8 ounces it would be a good idea. I quickly deployed that tarp over the tent and after another round of changing clothes slept great through the rest of the night.

Day 2 (edit: 10-25-2021 - Section from Rock Pond to Hardigan Pond was accidentally deleted from the original post)

Having woke energized since I started day 1 immediately following a long drive overnight, I was expecting the worst and hoping for the best in regards to the next carry from Rock Pond to Hardigan Pond. I have previously spoken of this carry and the waist deep mud that kicked off the first 75-100 yards of the carry. I found the sign for the carry on the other side of the pond and was pleasantly surprised to see that there was no mud. Instead there was a moss covered single track through a stand of young pines and picking up an old jeep trail. The middle section was dominated by three or so major beaver dams before changing back to a nice even Jeep trail. Eventually the carry leaves the Jeep trail fir another single track leading to the Hardigan Pond put in.

In 2013 the carry began with a river of mud:
P5030057 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

The trail follows the edge of several large beaver dams and is wet:
PA180053 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180049 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180048 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

One dam had a major blowout that needs to be traversed and is about 6' deep.
PA180052 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Some flora along the carry:
PA180055 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180056 by Barry Rains, on Flickr



PA180032 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Heading out in the rain on Hardigan Pond, the next destination was LITTLE Salmon Lake. Not to be confused with Salmon Lake which is on private property. I made a little error here. First, there is no carry shown on my map. My memory from my 2013 trip is that I was able to paddle and pole generally from the Hardigan pond outlet through a marsh to LITTLE Salmon Lake. But on this trip, I saw a sign for a carry. Maybe someone can confirm, but I believe that it is marked Salmon Lake carry and not LITTLE Salmon Lake. Why would there be a carry marked to a lake on private lands I thought? I moved to the outlet and commenced what turned out to be a fairly epic drag through a choked water way that traversed a huge wetland. Half way through (about 35 minutes), I was soaked, dazed, and maybe even lost! The map told me to keep going but I wasn't confident and really didn't want to turn around. I grabbed the map, dug out my compass, and a granola bar and tried to steady myself on the floating bog mass that seemed to sink every time I shifted my weight. Looking out all I saw was more of the same marsh and out in the distance some mountain peaks. Once orientated, I trusted my tools and set out onward. After about 10 more minutes, the outlet began to open up and I got Cricket and myself back in the canoe and headed for the Lilly Pad Pond Carry. I happened to look back after we were back in the canoe and damnit if I didn't see a carry sign at the wood line. So keep this in mind if your'e heading out on this. While dragging through, I thought how dumb it was not to create a carry so that people didn't tear up the wetland habitat and apparently they did. BUT....they should add the word LITTLE to the sign to be correct, or maybe I misread. The next person through should confirm and report back.

Follow the outlet the map said, it would be fun they said:
PA180059 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Dragging the outlet through a bog:
PA180058 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180057 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180060 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

The bog opens up and were paddling to the Lilly Pond Carry. Cricket is looking at the sign and thinking, "Dude, can't you read the sign!":
PA180062 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA180065 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

My goal for day two was Lake Lila. So I needed to get to Lilly Pad Pond via the next carry, paddle to the Single Shanty Brook carry, and make my way up Shingle Shanty Brook to Lake Lila. A note here: in Spring 2013, there was still litigation as to whether the entire Shingle Shanty Brook should be considered navigable with right of way for public access. I think at the time I was following the legal process on ADKforum which one can go back to to read the detailed reports of the court battle. When I was there my best understanding was that I could access this lower part legally, and in fact there were no 'no trespassing' signs because the courts had ordered them taken down. So that's what I did. The landowner's eventually won out, and now you need to use the long established carry that bypassed the private portions of the brook. The carry, in my opinion is preferable to the never ending sinuous winding of the brook itself.. It constantly turns back on itself and after a while becomes almost obnoxious.

2013 access from Lilly Pad pond on the private section of Shingle Shanty Brook:
P5040119 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

2013 access from Lilly Pad pond on the private section of Shingle Shanty Brook:
P5040121 by Barry Rains, on Flickr
 
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Day 2 Continued:
I continued on the carry from Lillypad Pond to Shingle Shanty Brook. Like most of the carries, it is uneven terrain pocked with holes, roots, and rocks and wet areas but not terrible in any sense. When you get to the put in at SSB, the water is about 6' down and a bit tricky to load (and probably unload) a canoe.

Shingle Shanty Brook, current legal put-in:
PA180066 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Paddling the twisty brook generally yields the exact same terrain as it makes its way to Lake Lila, indeed you may view the same scene multiple times in a 5 minute period as the brook undulates upon itself:
PA180069 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

As I got nearer to Lake Lila, I was pretty beat down and the wind was picking up. I knew there was a Lean shelter on the lake but have never seen it and kind of hoped that the lake would be calm and there would be enough daylight to make the shelter for a change of pace. This was not to be. As I entered the lake, the waves and wind were such that I could never make it to the opposite side of the lake to find the lean to. Rather, I chose to make a bee line to Site 17. The wind made it tricky and it was pitch dark before I could get the tent up and start dinner. Site 17 sits in the woods just off a nice beach shore line. It was nostalgic as I had spent some good nights here in the past with my previous dog Copper:

2013 Trip view of the shore from Site 17:
P9290168 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Day 3
Back to this Fall trip, looking out towards Mt. Frederica in the morning of day 3:
PA190078 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

I was worried this AM listening to the wind and waves lapping on the shoreline outside the tent. I laid there in the comfort of my down quilt wondering what I would do if I couldn't get off the lake today. However, after a slow start, the sun rose and the waves and wind were quite manageable. I could hear a dog bark and realized there was someone else on Lila. I had not seen anyone since I started the trip. I broke down camp and packed. Heading out to cross to the Harrington Brook outlet carry, I paddle with some vigor in order to not get caught in big rollers or strong winds as the sun rose. To this point Cricket was still being a little monster at times. But she was very well behaved in the canoe the whole lake crossing. Off in the far distance towards the lean shelter, I did see my first human being paddling. Perhaps it was one of you. If so, I apologize if you could hear me cuss at my dog the night before.

Before too long, we arrived at the other side of Lake Lila for the Harrington Brook Outlet carry.
PA190082 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

The outlet into Lake Lila:
PA190084 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

By the way, up until now, I hadn't heard much noise pollution, just wind past my ears, and the paddle pulling through the water. But now I was being bombarded with the sound of presumably military jets over and over. This would persist for another day at least.

Completing the carry Cricket and I made our way up Harrington Brook past Ranier Brook and into Harrington Pond where we would jump up onto the old railroad tracks and make the longish carry to Clear Pond. This brook is wider and has far less twists and turns. I think there was only one beaver dam that we needed to ascend.

Views from Harrington Brook:
PA190087 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA190088 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

PA190097 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Cricket was becoming a better canoetripper too. Her previous canoe trips were whitewater day trips and easy overnights. The lessons learned were coming back....and maybe just maybe a weariness was creeping into her bones.
PA190090 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

I don't have pictures of the carry to Clear Pond from this trip, here it is in 2013 with my Stewart River Prospector:
P9300369 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

After reaching Clear Pond, you paddle across the minor expanse to a private right of way road to make a short carry over to Bog Lake. While paddling across I saw a white dog hauling butt across the roadway followed by a man in blaze orange. Once we got to the take out, we set up for the carry and set out with the Portage Pack first. After walking along the dirt roadway for about 100 yds, you huck off into the woods and continue the carry to Bog Lake. As we got near to the clearing at the end of the carry, Cricket set alight a bird and I thought, "you silly dog you're not an upland bird dog, you're a BOOM BOOM!" Before I could finish my thought that bird was under fire and two shotgun blast rang out. Cricket immediately let out a bark and I told her to stop barking. As we turned the corner of the little mound that separated us from the blasts, there were two hunters and a beautiful white bird dog getting it done. I told them I needed to still bring my canoe across, dropped off the pack and headed back. On the way back with the canoe, the hunters and dog were sitting in the woods and said they figured they would wait until I came back. No harm no foul, they couldn't see me and I didn't see them. Later I thought that maybe I should have asked for recognition that that bird was Cricket's and not some fancy bird dog's!

So now it was time to set upon Bog Lake and continue to the day's destination at Lows Lake. Bog lake starts out wide and soon narrows to a moderate river size. The woods that line it are typical for the North Country, but there are some interesting artifacts to see, apparently though I didn't take many pics this time.

The old standing tree I call the Grey Beard Tree:
PA190099 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

And Cricket....laying down for the first time. I told her when she was a puppy that she would never win and I would always be stronger.
PA190098 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

I noticed as we approached Lows Lake that the wind was getting stiffer. At the entrance to Lows lake, there is a huge floating bog. Sometimes you can carry or pass by it on the right and be on the lake. Usually, my experience has been you need to paddle out around it to continue down the lake past the islands and to the upper dam. An so it was that I proceeded around the bog. Did I mention that this is a huge bog? I started by paddling hard as we were heading straight into the wind which seemed to be amplifying every few paddle strokes. It was about 2:30 and the wind and waves were getting worse. My plan was to paddle well out into the main lake and come about and make a run down the lake to a suitable campsite. I misjudged however and soon found myself being pushed towards the wrong side of the bog pretty much helpless to stop it. I was paddling hard to now avail. I was regretting my poor decision or lack of judgment on getting out on the lake in the current conditions. Looking at the approaching bog I saw a log partially submerged and thought I could somehow use it as a solid base to aid me in getting my 16.5' canoe aimed directly in the wind for another run at it. Cricket was getting restless with all the commotion and I wasn't 100% sure what was going to happen, or what I would do if it didn't work. I was running out of gas.

As I hit the log perpendicular to the canoe, I steadied myself and put one leg out onto it and thankfully it was locked in and solid. I was yelling at the dog to sit as she was thinking were getting ready to bail out. With one foot on the log and both hands on the gunnels, I was able to out power the wind and get the nose of the canoe directly into the wind and get back to my paddling position before it could turn me aside again. I paddled like a madman until I was out in the great expanse again making sure I had plenty of room to come about and make my turn. At that point I was about 150 yards or so from the only spit of private land on that part of the lake and there is a house there. I wondered to myself if there was anyone there to witness my plight or if I failed, would there be no one to see me roll the canoe and surely not be found until some poor soul came upon my floating corpse.

Of course, I made the turn and it took some effort. For what seemed like 5 minutes I was stuck with the length of the boat bobbing and wallowing in the swells...up I'd rise as the waves came portside and I'd slide down them into the troughs. But I had to turn 90 degrees and it was hard!. I did manage it and now I was running down wind. The waves were rolling up the length of the canoe from stern to bow now. But I wasn't out of the woods yet. The rollers were touching the gunnels as they approached the bow about 3-4' from the stem and I was worried that one or more of them would break and start to fill the boat. Alas they did not and I made it to Site 20 with the sun shining, wind howling, and no worse for wear. I was calling it a day. I set up camp and hung out some items to dry and generally tried to forget the whole experience. I did however look at those waves while I was eating dinner and realized they were strong enough for a body board. I slept really, really well that night.
 
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Day 4

Waking up the next morning on Lows, we found blue skies, and calm seas.

Cricket enjoys a little sunshine before leaving site 20 and heading to Bog River:
PA200104 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Are next destination was uncertain. Our first goal for the day was to get to Hitchen's Pond, just past the upper dam. So we struck out. The sun was blazing and of course right in front of us. Not only was it getting warmer than I care for, I was struggling to see. Still, it was nice to have some sun shining upon us. So we paddled and crossed another infamous bog on the Bog River and made it to Lows upper dam without incident.

There's a short carry around the upper dam and then you carry past some old ruins and a kiosk with a lot of information about the site and business man AA Lows. Some good reading. These pics are from a previous trip:

P5050210 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

P5050208 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

In Spring, there are a lot of flowers that still bloom among the ruins from a time when this was a bustling place. It was still before noon on Hitchens Pond and I knew that there were only a couple of sites left before I hit Lows Lower dam. This is where most people end their trip, but I was to continue past the lower dam and there are no designated sites again until reaching Round Lake. As I did on my 2013 trip, I made the decision to go for it. We reached the Lower dam and made the carry across the breast of the dam and down to the river. This is a beautiful river with some class 2 rapids and some carries. The water turned out to be plenty for paddling except the rapids. I scraped the hell out of the canoe on the first class 2 rapid and realized that I may not be able to run portions of the river without causing serious issues to the light weight hull. In 2013 there was more water and I was able to run the river in my wood canvas prospector.

(Edit 10-25-2021 - added additional description and some photos of the river)

The river is, in my opinion the prettiest part of the trip. But I'm partial to rivers.

PA200114 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

P5060230 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

The first carry is around split rock falls and the second is around Pa's Falls. Both are marked now, they weren't back in 2013. At Pa's falls there is an old bridge that takes you across the river and is an old jeep road that takes you from Pa's falls on Bog river, all the way past the confluence of Bog river and Bog Stream. Taking this would be about the same amount of carrying as I would have if I kept heading down river from Pa's falls, but I recalled that it was rough terrain with no markings. In Spring 2013, there was plenty of water and I ran all the rapids to the confluence. But I was concerned there might not be enough water this time. After a quick lunch, I decided I would cross the river and try to make the carry as quick as possible. I was double carrying on this trip. It was a smooth carry and took about 30 minutes each trip. The trail is clearly marked on the paddler's map. So now my gear was on Bog Stream above the confluence with Bog River and there are limited sections that can be paddled. My best guess is maybe 300-400 yards total at best and intermittent. The trail that I had traversed crosses the river via a ratty old bridge and roughly parallels the stream. I decided to forego the repeated in/out of carrying the flat sections and try to make Round Lake by dark using the trail and carry that ascends along the river right bank.

The bridge I crossed at Pa's Falls to carry over to Bog Stream:
P5060239 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

Drop along Bog Stream Carry to Round Lake
P5070255 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

This turned out to be a never ending slog that kept me from reaching a site on Round lake until after dark. I even had to jettison the canoe along the carry so that I could make it to Round Lake and some semblance of a camp site. There really is no place to set a camp along the white water section of the carry. It is a rough trail of rock and roots, single track width and hemmed in by thick, rolling woods on one side and the river on the other. The carry, same as it did back in 2013 gave me a thorough lashing. As the darkness overcame me on Round Lake and all but my canoe had made it, i was dead tired and my feet were blistered. I went straight to the lake to fill my gravity filter and then made a hasty set up of our tent. While the water bottles were filling and Cricket finally got supper, I removed my portage shoes and gazed at the blisters. I figured a good night's sleep and fresh dry socks would allow me to get my canoe at first light to finish the trip.

Day 5
The next morning Cricket and I broke camp, moved all the gear to the lakeside, and set out for the canoe. I felt way better then the previous night, but my feet were still tender. I grabbed the canoe and we headed back. As we reached the gear and loaded up the canoe for the final paddle across Round Lake and into Little Tupper Lake, the skies opened up and ice cold rain came down. It continued to rain for the duration of our paddle back to the truck. I didn't take pictures of this carry, but I think I can get some from another trip and will add them later.

Copper, my previous dog was the same age when she did her first ADK trip from Long to Tupper via the Raquette river. I swore I wouldn't take here again but she turned out to be an exceptional tripping dog who did many trips some up to 13 days. I think that given that and the progress she made from Lows to the end of the trip, she will turn out to be a great tripping dog in her own right.

Cricket finally succumbs to the total sum of what she accomplished over 5 days as we near the LTL headquarters in the rain.
PA210117 by Barry Rains, on Flickr

I will try to append some of my passages with some map details and any other photos I find. But it's time to get back to work and it may take a little time. But I will answer any questions the best I can.

Cheers,
Barry
 
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Wow, Quite the adventure. Type 2 fun!

Thanks for the details regarding the area between Hardigan Pond and Lake Lila. Might save me from thinking I’m lost when I get there eventually.
 
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So, Barry, do I understand you correctly that one can avoid the arduous Hardigan Pond outlet/bog drag by means of a carry from Hardigan Pond to Little Salmon Lake (mislabelled Salmon Lake carry)? Thence from Lilypad Pond to Shingle Shanty Brook via a carry to avoid the private land portion of the pond and brook?

I have just had my newly restored Willow 15' out for her maiden paddle last evening. I had made a paddling thwart to try out, but I'll put in a regular seat. I can't imagine several days of kneeling, and judging by your trip report I'll appreciate the relative comfort of a seat after the struggles of managing boggy carries!
 
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Thanks for checking it out everyone. I still need to find a clean map in pdf format and I will be able to add some marked up sections of the map for you. Also, I added a couple more words and pics. Seems I accidentally deleted the start of day 2 in the original post and I added some pics on Day 4 for the Bog River and Bog Stream.
Very nice report, and glad Cricket settled down for you. Good looking pup (and love the earlier canoe you had).
WinterWarlock, I still have the wood prospector and it's still my main tripping boat but i was trying to go as light as i could for this trip.
 
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Patrick,

Yes, there is a carry at the outlet of Hardigan Pond that circumvents the whole wetlands and is of course recommended. It was a dumb mistake on my part to drag through. It turns out that if you look at the sign in kiosk at he LTL headquarters, down in the lower right corner, there is a small partial map that tells you that the carry was added to avoid travel through the wetlands. I did not see that until i finished my trip and was signing out.
The Willow looks great. I do most of my trips in a stewart river prospector and it would have been a tad more comfortable with a rookie dog, but the ultralight Northstar is a fast boat and I wanted to pare down the weight for this trip.

Cheers,
Barry
 
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Nice trip report, Barry. I've done all that you traversed through the years, but never all at once.
Too bad you didn't have better weather, but at least you were prepared for all of it.
 
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Wonderful trip report! Thank you. Impressive adventure all the way around, but I was particularly impressed that when Cricket was engaged with the bear and you called her, she actually came! Great pup, and obviously, good training. We've made separate trips to Low's, Lila, and Little Tupper. Your report makes me want to stitch a couple of them together. The Whitney Wilderness is a beautiful area. Well done, and thanks for sharing.
 
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WinterWarlock, I still have the wood prospector and it's still my main tripping boat but i was trying to go as light as I could for this trip.

I may have missed it, but which Prospector is it? I'm looking at an antique 16' Carleton, but it seems to be more of a Bob's Special than a Prospector...also have a 15'6" Mansfield.
 
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Nice trip report, I look forward to watching Cricket’s progression as a tripping partner. I have been to the lakes in your report but never the carries, I’m impressed you did it twice. Great pictures too, Thanks.
 
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I may have missed it, but which Prospector is it? I'm looking at an antique 16' Carleton, but it seems to be more of a Bob's Special than a Prospector...also have a 15'6" Mansfield.
My prospector is the 16' stewart river w/c. its actually covered with dacron instead of canvas to save some weight. It held up better on the 2013 trip than the Kevlight Light layup on the NorthStar that I took this year. Totally different boats but I enjoy both of them.
 
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Nice trip report, I look forward to watching Cricket’s progression as a tripping partner. I have been to the lakes in your report but never the carries, I’m impressed you did it twice. Great pictures too, Thanks.
Thanks Robin. I think she's going to be a great dog. I think the trip had a big, positive impact on her. I don't see myself going past Lows Lower Dam again...twice was enough, I'll keep doing sections of the rest of the loop though.
 
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Damn, that's a beautiful dog. Nice lake scenery too. I need to make that trip. It's about #3 on the bucket list and climbing. Old friend lives in the Albany area so.....
 
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Damn, that's a beautiful dog. Nice lake scenery too. I need to make that trip. It's about #3 on the bucket list and climbing. Old friend lives in the Albany area so.....
thanks, she’s coming along well, we’ll be paddling a lot for the next two months since rifle season is starting. Whatever trip you make to the ADK i would recommend going at least two weeks earlier than i did so you are more likely to have better weather and fall colors. I had planned to go a little earlier and a few days longer but work schedules are what they are sometimes.
 
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Barry,

what an amazing trip … made all the better with a young tripping companion. Cricket looks to be a fantastic canoe tripping partner. I really enjoy solo reports with dogs. My dog Jake is a truly amazing canoe country buddy, and we have developed an intense chemistry together. There is just nothing like it. It seems Cricket, like Copper, made huge strides in that regard as well. Your Day 3 experience together certainly bear that out.

I read this story, coffe in hand on this mid teens chilly morning, sitting by my wood stove with Jake on my lap. We really loved the story and the pictures, brought back so many memories of Jakes first couple of trips with me … shinning times!

Excellent trip report, and Cricket is awesome! You have another terrific dog there .

Bob.
 
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