Too Much Reading, Not Enough Doing

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I don't get out of the water nearly enough: maybe one trip per year, ranging from an overnighter to a weeklong on one of Maine's busier rivers (Allagash, St. Croix, etc.). Want more!

But while the experience is modest, I know a fair amount about canoeing through wide reading and research. My blog, Indigenous Boats, examines any aspect of boat design, building or use that catches my interest, as long as it's outside of the Euro-American plank-on-frame tradition: bark and dugout canoes, kayaks, umiaks, rafts, coracles, reed boats, sampans, dhows, jangadas.... I'm searching for all the info. on dugout canoes I can find: please send me links to obscure academic papers, archival photos, first-person accounts, etc.

I've built a few small craft, and I have a solo freestyle stripper canoe under construction (for, oh, let's say 3 years or so). I'm a real butcher with tools, but I admire and appreciate those who know how to use them: a well-built boat is one of the most beautiful things I can think of.
 
Joined
Sep 2, 2011
Messages
6,389
Location
Raymond, ME
I don't get out of the water nearly enough: maybe one trip per year, ranging from an overnighter to a weeklong on one of Maine's busier rivers (Allagash, St. Croix, etc.). Want more!

But while the experience is modest, I know a fair amount about canoeing through wide reading and research. My blog, Indigenous Boats, examines any aspect of boat design, building or use that catches my interest, as long as it's outside of the Euro-American plank-on-frame tradition: bark and dugout canoes, kayaks, umiaks, rafts, coracles, reed boats, sampans, dhows, jangadas.... I'm searching for all the info. on dugout canoes I can find: please send me links to obscure academic papers, archival photos, first-person accounts, etc.

I've built a few small craft, and I have a solo freestyle stripper canoe under construction (for, oh, let's say 3 years or so). I'm a real butcher with tools, but I admire and appreciate those who know how to use them: a well-built boat is one of the most beautiful things I can think of.


Bob I can't picture you with a club aka Fred Flintstone..Nor does Cate look much like Wilma :)

Anyhow..welcome...another Maine Canoe Symposium stalwart..!

Kim
 
Joined
Oct 27, 2012
Messages
136
Location
Ottawa, Canada
Stoneage - your site is a fantastic source for information on indigenous craft

Stoneage - your site is a fantastic source for information on indigenous craft

Welcome aboard Stoneage but you've scuppered me for doing anything else for quite some time.:)
Your website/blog is going to take me ages to go through. And believe me, I'll be going through every page.
I love and appreciate all the work that you have done finding and uploading information and photos on a myriad of indigenous craft.
A fantastic resource fit for hours of excellent reading and viewing.
Many, many thanks,
Ted
 
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Guest

Guest
I read your blog all the time. Great work. However, you are responsible for quite a bit of lost productivity.

Daniel


I don't get out of the water nearly enough: maybe one trip per year, ranging from an overnighter to a weeklong on one of Maine's busier rivers (Allagash, St. Croix, etc.). Want more!

But while the experience is modest, I know a fair amount about canoeing through wide reading and research. My blog, Indigenous Boats, examines any aspect of boat design, building or use that catches my interest, as long as it's outside of the Euro-American plank-on-frame tradition: bark and dugout canoes, kayaks, umiaks, rafts, coracles, reed boats, sampans, dhows, jangadas.... I'm searching for all the info. on dugout canoes I can find: please send me links to obscure academic papers, archival photos, first-person accounts, etc.

I've built a few small craft, and I have a solo freestyle stripper canoe under construction (for, oh, let's say 3 years or so). I'm a real butcher with tools, but I admire and appreciate those who know how to use them: a well-built boat is one of the most beautiful things I can think of.
 
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