Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Bowron Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Nice photos. Someday I'll try to figure out how to get my thousands of slides, if I can find them, into a computer.

    I also like your Charlie Walbridge red Hi-Float whitewater PFDs. I have one of those.

    What time of year was the trip and the temperatures? You all are pretty much bundled up on land and water.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Glenn MacGrady View Post
      Nice photos. Someday I'll try to figure out how to get my thousands of slides, if I can find them, into a computer.

      I also like your Charlie Walbridge red Hi-Float whitewater PFDs. I have one of those.

      What time of year was the trip and the temperatures? You all are pretty much bundled up on land and water.
      Glenn,

      My bad for neglecting to say when we did the trip. We started on September 28, and finished on October 4. The upside of a late season trip, was that we saw only two other canoes. During the height of the season, one often has to share designated campsites with strangers, albeit like-minded paddlers. A downside of this late-season trip was that the days were short, and the nights were very long. I didn’t record temperatures, but they were certainly on the cool side. I don’t remember if we had any frost, but I wouldn’t be surprised. Heavy dew most nights. Firewood was soaked, and very difficult to establish a true campfire. Lots of time in the tent.

      Scanning slides is tedious. If they have mostly been stored, without taking them out of the tray, they are pretty clean. If they have been viewed over the years, they have lots of grunge on them. I might clean and scan a slide three, four or five times. Once I get it pretty clean, I give it to Kathleen, who uses Adobe Photoshop Element to sort of paste over the defect with surrounding background.

      We still have those Hi-float PFDs. I keep meaning to replace them, as they are probably no longer high-float. But I always say, “Heck. They’re probably still good.”

      Comment


        #18


        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron109.jpg
Views:	77
Size:	144.1 KB
ID:	109854

        Our last (7th) day, on October 4th, we head down Spectacle Lake in a drizzle that has continued since last evening.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron110.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	122.9 KB
ID:	109855

        We are becoming wet and discouraged, and look forward to the take-out at the end of Bowron Lake.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron111.jpg
Views:	62
Size:	169.3 KB
ID:	109856

        We continue to paddle in the rain, as we approach the north end of Spectacle Lakes.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron112.jpg
Views:	66
Size:	133.7 KB
ID:	109857

        The rain continues as we paddle 7.2 km (4.5 miles) down Bowron Lake.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron113.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	169.8 KB
ID:	109858

        Even our Goretex, only four years old, is now beginning to leak.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron114.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	143.2 KB
ID:	109859

        We finally approach the north end of Bowron Lake.

        Click image for larger version

Name:	Bowron115.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	343.6 KB
ID:	109860

        I carry the canoe back up the short portage to the van. I don't remember what I did with that canoe cart. I don't know why I didn't secure the painters within the deck bungees. Maybe it was the rain. I hate the rain. We were glad to have done the Bowron Lake Circuit. Everyone in British Columbia has done it. And now so have we. But Kathleen and I are not big fans of popular, and often crowded canoe trips. We rebel against areas that have designated camping sites. After all, that's why we became canoeists. To paddle down unending rivers. To camp where and when we please. To be free from the noise of civilization. To be emancipated from our fellow citizens, even though they be paddlers. But hey, that's just us. To each their own.





















        Comment


          #19
          Great pictures. Thanks once again for posting.

          Comment


            #20
            We did our trip late August. We had to share a site twice at the start of the trip then we saw no one.

            I scanned some two thousand slides with a Wolverine. It only took two days to clean and digitize them. Some were from 1969. I wanted to bug my kids digitally now with baby pictures! The Wolverine was pricey but very easy to use. Now it needs another home

            Comment


              #21
              Man, Bowron has gone viral on this website. I was actually thinking of driving there, perhaps to watch Steve'n Idaho pole the mighty Cariboo River and Babcock Creek. But what a downer denouement by PortagingPitt.

              Let's do a quickie cost/benefit analysis. I could drive at least 6,000 round trip miles in my clunky 24 year old Magic Bus, which gets 14 miles per gallon, to arrive at some long skinny lakes that may be (a) closed due to microbes, (b) closed due to fires, (c) cold, (d) dark, dismal and rainy, and/or (e) populated by the throngs of Calcutta.

              Haha. Not a close call.

              Anything's better than this chicken cooping.

              Comment


                #22
                I am not sure where the Throngs of Calcutta were when we were there.The first and second nights we shared a campsite with similarly creaky aged people who were not about to do three long portages in a day. ( What is the sense of running through this area?) There is a very pleasant basic car camping trip at the start of the circuit. We however did park our trailer in the parking lot so we were not taking a campsite nor paying for one. When we finished our loop ( after sharing a campsite twice out of six nights and the sites are designed for multiple cells as some are here at home) we hitched up our trailer and took a looky loo around the campground.. Out of some thirty sites. one was taken..

                Eeny meeny miney mo. We picked one and backed in and started our cleanup. Nice to have a shower right at the end of a trip. Then we drove to town ( bit of a drive ) for dinner.

                Yes it was not quite a wilderness experience but it was nice to find portages that are actually packed dirt and not a jumble of rocks. And I thoroughly enjoyed the varied and different flora.

                We were there in August 2017. It did not rain the entire week.. Nor had it much that summer hence the wildfires. We did pass one still burning.. Interesting small fire up the side of a mountain.
                Swimming.. not much.. These are glacial runoff lakes.

                Comment


                  #23
                  I agree with your rhetorical question, yellowcanoe: “What is the sense of running through this area?”

                  Well, one guy in our canoe club, Steve, was young, strong and athletic. He and a similarly-blessed friend did exactly that. I can’t remember the specific number, but they completed the circuit in under 20 hours. I think it was 17 hours. Were probably travelling light.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X