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  • LanceR
    replied
    Jim, I would note that my dream build might be Nancy's nightmare. When we had our farm I had a nice 5800 square foot shop a hundred yards from the house. Unfinished projects such as disassembled tractors or military trucks. both which we collected at the time, abounded safe from her disapproving looks. Now that my only shop space is in the basement and very visible unfinished projects tend to give her a rash.....which generally prove to be contagious.

    And as I'm a former finish and trim carpenter, builder of custom houses and and a longtime maker of specialty staircases she's used to seeing me work at a commercial pace. All of which sometimes spreads the rash if I don't treat projects like paying jobs that are keeping me from starting the next paying job or if I want to step back for a few days (weeks?).

    I've used a fair bit of epoxy as an adhesive or topcoat but have never done any fiberglass-epoxy work. I guess that someday I will mill up some strips, glue up a couple of curved practice panels and lay up some fiberglass on them just to get my feet wet.

    And I agree that sometimes the hunt for the "just right" board or veneer is a big part of fine woodworking. I'm a sucker for book-matched door panels, naturally curved grain in boat parts etc.

    Best regards to all,


    Lance

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  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Lance, it all starts with a dream ! I wake up in the middle of the night thinking about building these things. It's been that way for 30 yrs. An Addiction for sure !

    I first saw those 18.5' Ash planks, They were buried under stacks of other wood. All I could see, was the edge grain. I was going to have to wait awhile to get them. I paid for three planks on the spot !

    It was a few months later that I was able to get them. I was chomping at the bit to get them home. Since then I stock piled 5 more planks. More than I will use in a lifetime. At least I can sleep at night now !

    Searching for lumber is a part of the fun !

    Good luck !

    Jim

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  • LanceR
    replied
    Snapping a chalk line and using two or more boards clamped or tacked to the line would work, too. If I had to do it today I guess I'd be making use of two planks myself since I don't have anything longer than 16' on hand.

    I daydream sometimes about building a strip canoe or kayak but haven't yet decided to do so. Although my first instinct would be to turn to the band saw or my Unisaw to rip the strips I will admit that the idea of a fence equipped circular saw made me go "Hmmm...." I'd likely give it a shot, too.

    I believe that we've pretty certainly lost the battle to protect the ash trees from the Asian Longhorned Beetle and that long ash will only get harder to find. There's a number of hardwood sawmills within an hour or so of me. I plan to start nosing around to see who would be willing and able to cut some long ash boards for things like gunwales and whether anyone in the region cuts long cedar boards. There's a good custom cabinet and millwork shop nearby with whom I've collaborated on a few jobs since we retired to North Carolina and I'll start by picking their brains. If I find anything out I'll post back and maybe we can figure out the logistics of getting some long stock to at least some of the members here.

    Best regards to all,


    Lance

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  • Cruiser
    replied
    Jim ... I have found that if you just cut the first strip as sacrificial, it pretty much gets things to the point where the strips are uniform ... this is for the "normal" rough lumber type of edge, if you get into something a little more dramatic, that may require more.

    Lance, we are talking 18' plus length boards, finding similar boards with a straight edge for that operation , may be quite a challenge, on shorter pieces it could work for sure.

    On shorter pieces I usually use a sled for the wood to establish a straight edge.

    Brian

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  • BWCA66
    replied
    Been routering outer gunnels with a router table set up before putting them on and using a sander on the inner gunnels after installation. It's always fun to learn how many different ways everyone does the different steps in canoe building and repair. That's what makes them all unique.

    Leave a comment:


  • LanceR
    replied
    Straightening a plank edge is pretty easy if you have a plank the same length or longer that already has at least one straight edge. Clamp the straight plank on top of the wavy one offset to whatever distance is needed for your saw to ride along the straight side as a fence and cut away. Face the straight edge away from the wavy edge to ride the straight edge down your tablesaw or band saw fence or place the straight edge on the same side as the wavy edge to follow it with your circular or jigsaw. Let me know if pictures would be helpful....

    Best regards to all,


    Lance

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  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Originally posted by Robin View Post
    Thanks for the answers to my questions Jim, very helpful. I found that saw on amazon for a good price and will order one soon.
    I always thought ripping rails was a table saw thing, my table saw really struggles. I’m looking forward to trying the new saw.
    I did buy one of those cheap finish routers from Harbor Freight but I need more practice.
    Thanks again.
    Skilsaws Rule !

    Robin, you will be impressed at how smooth the strips cut with a Skilsaw come out. A simple fence and two clamps. One clamp being a Visegrip on the front, makes it handier and safer.

    A trick when cutting narrow planks. Lay another plank the same thickness, next to the narrow one to support the base of the saw.

    Is the new Makita, aluminum base, or Magnesium ? The Magnesium bases slide on the planks a little easier, in my experience.

    Yeah, Routers and bits can be a pain, especially around screw holes ! Maybe try and router before attaching to the hull ? Good Luck !



    Doug ! I scored some long and wide Ash planks. The edges were uneven, and I true them, as you dod, following a snapped line. I used the Dewalt for that, beings it didn't have a fence.

    Pretty hard to plane the edge, on a 18.5' plank. It turned out straight enough, that the fence on the Skilsaw followed it perfect !

    Jim

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  • dougd
    replied
    Robin, I used to use a router to round off the gunwales but it always came out a little wavy which required a lot of sanding. I switched to this and am happy with it but I like having more wood then less, this only will go so far, not as far as a router:

    https://www.rockler.com/carbide-tipp...SABEgLwBPD_BwE

    I too switched from a table saw to cut the gunwales. I now lay the board down, snap a line and then cut it with my circular saw, a lot cleaner and easier. The table saw was always a pain to use for a long cut like gunwales.

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  • Robin
    replied
    Thanks for the answers to my questions Jim, very helpful. I found that saw on amazon for a good price and will order one soon.
    I always thought ripping rails was a table saw thing, my table saw really struggles. I’m looking forward to trying the new saw.
    I did buy one of those cheap finish routers from Harbor Freight but I need more practice.
    Thanks again.

    Leave a comment:


  • RickR
    replied
    I really like how the grain runs through both out wales! It's not easy keeping track of that. Well done!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Originally posted by Robin View Post
    Jim, Could you give the model number of the Makita?

    Also, how wide do you cut the ash for gunnels and what is the finished width?

    Do you round off with a router or belt sander?

    Are the gunnels attached when you round them off?

    I cut the to a little over 3/4, round off with a belt sander when the gunnels are screwed on. Always looking for new ways.

    Thanks,
    Robin
    The Makita I have, was purchased when they were made in Japan. The new ones are made in China. Not saying the new ones are bad ! Mine was only 13 AMP. but plenty sufficient They are now made in 15 AMP. I'm not at the shop, but believe the number is 5007.

    My out whales are 5/8", Some is removed to cap the hull, so only 3/8" sticks out from the hull.

    My Inwhales are cut 3/8", with a 3/8" spacer making the inwhale is 3/4".

    So adding them together , total width is 1 3/8" width. This is for my solos.

    I use a router on the top edges, after attaching, and route the bottom outside edge before installing. It's easier and less risky to the hull.

    The Skilsaw with a fence does such a nice job, My strongback does double duty,

    Here is a pic of the ends of my outwhales and how they are cut to cap the hull. Note how the bottom outside edge is routed before attaching.

    Click image for larger version

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    I hope that helps !

    Jim

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  • Robin
    replied
    Jim, Could you give the model number of the Makita?

    Also, how wide do you cut the ash for gunnels and what is the finished width?

    Do you round off with a router or belt sander?

    Are the gunnels attached when you round them off?

    I cut the to a little over 3/4, round off with a belt sander when the gunnels are screwed on. Always looking for new ways.

    Thanks,
    Robin

    Leave a comment:


  • Cruiser
    replied
    I bought one of the better Makitas a couple years ago. It is a beast and has cut anything I through at it, including 8/4 rough maple and ash.

    When I cut strips, it just loafs through the wood.

    Brian

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  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Originally posted by Traveler View Post
    Crap - I think that Dewalt is the same as the shiny new one I got for Christmas - model DWE575DC? As my only backup is a very old Black and Decker I will be trying the Dewalt out soon anyway, but Jim if it doesn't work out I may have to ask you talk to my wife to help me convince her to take it back
    Maybe your Dewalt is better ? Grab the base in one hand, and the handle in the other. Push and pull. If you notice, like I did, a lot of give between the base and body of the saw ? It's bad. I like the Dewalt, except for that.

    Have your Wife accompany you to the store, and demonstrate to her the difference, as I described above. Give her that dissapointed Puppy dog look, and hope for the best ! No guarantees !



    Seriously, the Dewalt should get the job done. As the old saying goes ! "Use What You Got "

    Good Luck !

    Jim

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  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Originally posted by dougd View Post
    Jeez Jim, Which do you have more of saws or canoes? That is quite the collection!

    Every time a good deal popped up on a saw, I came home with one. It's nice to be able to grab a saw, already set to cut a specific thickness. Without having to change back and forth.

    The Makita is a 13 amp. My first, good saw. It is a real veteran ! Probably cut at least half of all the strips for my canoes, as well as for others.

    I was going to round up all my strippers last year, for a photo. Maybe this year !

    I've said many times ! "This canoe building is an Addiction !"

    Jim


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