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    #46
    Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
    Here is a pic of my current saw setup. It is soo simple and effective. When choosing a saw for cutting strips, any saw with at least 13 amps is acceptable.
    For the blade I prefer Feud Diablo. It has a thin kerf, and it's a quality blade.
    The fence is a 3/4"x3/4" x1.8" aluminum angle. I trim the side that runs against the plank down to about 5/8". This insures that my fence does not catch on anything in case my plank is less than 3/4", and most of them are.
    Two C-clamps, and I'm ready to adjust the width of cut.

    This system produces the best strips, and at a minimal cost.
    The whole setup is less than $100.

    Jim
    I have a large Delta Unisaw that I had envisioned would be perfect for ripping my cedar strips someday. I am curious how the irregularities are realized if the fence is accurate. Obviously, the skill saw is the preferred choice by many and I would like to know what "went wrong" to seek out alternate cutting methods for accuracy and precision. Have to admit...I am a little saddened to learn that my table saw will not be up to the task for my future project.

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      #47
      The skil saw has a short "wheelbase" and is able to uniformly follow the edge of a board that that may not be or stay perfectly straight. The fence on a table saw is much longer. When a board is ripped that crowns away from the fence thinner strips result.

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        #48
        There are several advantages to the Skilsaw method. But accuracy and ease of doing it are the most important ! Cost is another.

        A Tables saw with a power feed, and long in feed and out feed tables, is just not practical for a Hobby builder. Nor does it do any better than a Skilsaw !

        Bead and cove as compared to hand beveling. B&C will keep the strips in place, where beveled strips can, and do slip out of place. I've been there and done that !

        B&C provides more surface for glue. I use very little glue with B&C, which saves a lot of scraping and sanding especially on the inside ( which is where the real pain is !)

        If you lift a canoe over head in the day light. You will see gaps between the strips. Not so with B&C. Most will argue that's not a problem ! I agree. I just don't like seeing the gaps !

        I would only consider a tablesaw if I was cutting 2X stock. You will have more waste, but if you can't find 1X stock ? A tablesaw will do it !

        I hope that helps !

        Jim


        Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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          #49
          Save the tablesaw for furniture work !

          I use the Skilsaw to cut my Ash gunnels also !

          Jim
          Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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            #50
            I know the skilsaw method works great but I have a good tablesaw setup with in/out feed tables in a nice sized shop with dust collection so that's what I use. I make sure the board has a straight edge before starting, which most of them do. Even if it's a little crooked it will follow the fence ok if you have the outside of the bow against the fence.

            Sometimes part way through a board something will go a little wonky so that your straight edge isn't any more. Then I just flip the board over and start running the other side against the fence.

            Alan

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              #51
              Will be giving the Skilsaw a whirl in a couple of weeks - the big draw for me is that I won't have to run 30 odd feet of in and out feed tables from the back of my garage halfway down my snow covered driveway. But I have to figure out the dust control part - I am sure there will be lots, as you have mentioned Jim. Thinking about some kind of shroud over the cutting table to at least direct most of it along a well-defined space on the floor, where it can be easily shop-vacced up before my wife gets home and claims the space for her car. Maybe just a tented tarp strung from the ceiling or some poles at either end of the table will do it - worth a shot I think.....

              Comment


                #52
                Don't over think it Traveler, it's a skilsaw and shrouding will be a tough thing to try. I would put everything away, with an eye to cleanup, get a good dust mask and have at it. Then sweep and blow out your work area.

                Brian

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                  #53
                  I just cut strips outside on the grass. No cleanup.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Yes. I've cut all my strips outside. The strips won't touch the ground, if I'm concerned about getting them wet.

                    The dust is swept up, and spread around the foundation of the house. Supposed to deter fleas and ticks. Never had a problem with either, so I can't vouch for it's effectiveness.

                    A Dust mask is mandatory, outside or inside ! Glues and eye protection should be mandatory also !

                    B&C depends on accurately cut strips, and the Skilsaw will do it , for less money invested in tools, less time, and with less waste.

                    I've traveled and cut strips for friends with my skilsaw in the back seat of a car. Do that with a tablesaw and to feed tables !

                    Yeah, I'm sold on the Skilsaw method of cutting strips ! Can you tell ?



                    Jim
                    Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Dogbrain, grass is a distant memory here - thought about setting up in my backyard but not keen about the prospect of running extension cords across potentially wet snow. But I did find a dust hose adapter on Amazon to connect my skilsaw to a shop vac - reviews range from "better than nothing" to "great", so it should at least help. At the end of the day I will probably have to just dive into it per Cruiser's point - won't start until January so should be used to blizzards by then anyway (har har).

                      On another point, is there any reason why I can't stack two boards and double my production per run with the saw? Jim, have you ever done it this way?

                      Comment


                        #56
                        thought about setting up in my backyard but not keen about the prospect of running extension cords across potentially wet snow
                        I don't see where that would be a problem other than possibly tripping a GFCI outlet/breaker if water gets into the terminals.

                        Alan

                        Comment


                          #57
                          Originally posted by Traveler View Post
                          Dogbrain, grass is a distant memory here - thought about setting up in my backyard but not keen about the prospect of running extension cords across potentially wet snow. But I did find a dust hose adapter on Amazon to connect my skilsaw to a shop vac - reviews range from "better than nothing" to "great", so it should at least help. At the end of the day I will probably have to just dive into it per Cruiser's point - won't start until January so should be used to blizzards by then anyway (har har).

                          On another point, is there any reason why I can't stack two boards and double my production per run with the saw? Jim, have you ever done it this way?
                          First off, use common sense when ever you do anything. I have no control over what you may be doing, and so I want to present a disclamer. I'm not responsible any injury you incur !

                          I cut strips one Winter. It was on cleared cement, and a decent day. Nice days in Ottawa might be a long time coming ! I set my saw on a 5 gallon bucket. It stays out of any snow. Tape the plug, and I'd call it safe. Obviously use a good cord. I use a 12 guage three prong.

                          Shop vac filters clog up quickly ! I clean the ones at the shop constantly. A home made cyclone dust collector would be a good idea !

                          Stacking two planks would increase any blade deflection, and thus more variation in thickness, especially on the bottom plank. The blade would also have more dust to clean out of the kerf, needing more HP. I'd stick to one at a time . A good question though !

                          I've been trying to post some pics, but Photobucket is not cooperating !

                          Good Luck !

                          Jim


                          Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

                          Comment


                            #58
                            Originally posted by dcloots View Post

                            Jim, any pictures of the differences between bead and coving and not that you could share? At some point I will build a boat. Already have all the books but the one major component missing is the time. I suppose when all three of my kids are off to college then I will have plenty of time. Anyhoo, curious about the aesthetics of a finished boat when it has been bead and coved and not bead and coved.

                            I'm struggling with Photobucket.So pics are hard to come byright now.

                            A few thoughts that will save you time. Build a stemless canoe, use staples ( Some may disagree with that last one ) Be minimal when applying glue to strips ! Bead and Cove your strips.
                            Maybe have the kids lend a hand ! ! I always say a Family that strips a canoe together, stays together ! Ha !

                            Spend some time searching forums for ideas. We all build differently. Through trial and error I've developed my methods. and they work for me.

                            Good luck !

                            Jim
                            Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

                            Comment


                              #59
                              I would suggest you don't try and stack the boards, it just complicates the process. With a single board, you can use a spare or extra board to form an extended bed allowing you to cut strips right to the end of a board, leaving little waste.

                              Earlier this fall, I prepared strips for the winter build, you can see in the pic a) a simple way to hold the boards, using small strips at an angle to prevent them sliding "in" and b) a second strip to hold them for sliding with the saw. You can make strips to almost the end of a board this way.

                              If you try and stack those boards, it will just get messy, trying to keep them from sliding on each other, properly supporting the saw when they get narrow ... if they slip at all, you have uneven strips ... it would likely be more work getting a double board setup working well than just getting it done. At this point in the pic, dragging out the strongback, setting up and cutting 78 strips took 3 hours ... in the context of a build, that is very little time.

                              Just my $.02

                              Brian

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                                #60
                                Just thought I would throw in a picture of cutting strips in my yard. I taped a little cardboard deflector on the saw where the dust comes out. It helped a bit with keeping the sawdust spraying directly on me.

                                Click image for larger version

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                                I don't have to sweep up anything, just rake it around a little and it disappears into the grass. Last winter I cut strips on the shovelled side walk and used the snow shovel to throw the sawdust into the snow covered yard.

                                Mark
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