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    #16
    I think I'll end up doing like alsg said, and cut lots of strips.

    Traveler, that is good way to figure. Hmm yes as much as I screw up, and I'll bet I end up with short strips, so I'll be cutting plenty more.

    Thanks for info Alan. I think this place is in Kingsport TN which is about 45 min drive. We're up that way every other weekend, and I'm always keeping an eye out for local saw Mills. I found one last spring, right off the road I've driven to work and back for past 27 years. Lots of mom and pop places don't advertise.

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      #17
      Question, I've got a few strips with knots in them. I like the natural look with knots in the wood, but is it structurally ok to have them? I guess if one of the knots fall out I can glue it back in, right?

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        #18
        Reading your post brought back lots of memories of my first wood and canvas build there in East Tenn in the basement of the dorm at LMU. I didn't have a lot of room either but had a great time. I'm sure you will find a way to make it work.
        To answer your question about knots in wood. Coming from a 30 year career of cabinet building and wood working I have found that it is important to know structurally all knots are not the same. A small tight red knot with No Cracks should stay in place and not cause any big problems. But, I would be careful where to use a strip with a red knot, I would avoid using it in a place where it would be under a lot of stress. There is NOTHING you can do with a black knot with a crack. Structurally, when you see a black knot with a crack think of it as a empty hole in the wood. Also, even cutting the knot out doesn't solve all the problems, the crazy wood surrounding a knot has lot of stress going in every direction.
        Getting to know the right guy with a saw mill will make your job a lot easier. I found most guys that work in the lumber business are hunters or fishermen and enjoy the outdoors and would be happy to give you advice concerning wood for your project.
        Good luck with your project
        .

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          #19
          I'm knot a fan of knots. I would get rid of it. However, lots of folks leave knots in and their boats still float.

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            #20
            Originally posted by memaquay View Post
            I'm knot a fan of knots. I would get rid of it. However, lots of folks leave knots in and their boats still float.
            Me either ! Knots are Knot worth the time it takes to deal with them !

            I'm more concerned as to the grain of your wood ! After you have the strips cut, are they quarter sawn ?

            The more grain lines you see in your strips, the stronger and better to work with ! Sanding knots is knot fun !


            Jim
            Last edited by Jim Dodd; 01-31-2020, 02:40 PM.
            Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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              #21
              Your sharp Jim. That is exactly what I've done is cut my strip out of a flat sawn board ( I think that's correct, flat sawn). I thought about it after I posted. The strips that I cut out of quarter sawn boards would break at the knots immediately after cutting.

              Can I cut my strips out of the flat sawn lumber like the picture I drew? Be better then scrapping the board.

              Thanks for advice penns woods and memaquay, I will avoid knots.

              I know I'm going slow with this, please bear with me. I knew I wouldn't have alot of time to devote to this, but I'll get cranking on it soon.

              Hey Penns woods, you really built a canoe in the basement of LMU? Wife said that is funny.

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                #22
                Roybrew
                Why yes I did. I had the laundry room, which was located in the basement, tied up for about 2 months. I guess the entire dorm can take a little credit in the build. Guys would come down to wash clothes and end up doing a lot of hand sanding. I can still remember when it was finished . Word spread and there must have been 50 guys to see the unveiling. It was a mixed crowd with some guys there that helped and a lot that said it would never get done or float.
                I enjoyed and paddled that little green canoe all over Norris Lake. That summer back at home I let a friend borrow it for the week end, when he got home he placed it along side his driveway, next day he jumped in his truck to go to work and backed right over it. Since then I've had other canoes but none hold a candle to that little East Tennessee canoe.

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                  #23
                  That will work fine for cutting your strips Roy. Great drawing. A picture Is worth a thousand words ! and, 5 hours of typing ( at my rate )

                  No need to hurry, unless you are being paid by the hour. Ha ! enjoy the build !

                  Jim

                  Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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                    #24
                    Trudging along with my build. Lots of rain here, so hard to do things outside. Made several rookie mistakes and had some equipment issues. Me or the skill saw wasn't doing very well cutting strips, so I resorted to my table saw for strip making. I underestimated how well the table saw would do, with regards to the thickness, and cut the strips to 1/4 inch and figured I'd run them through the planer for 3/16. They are very consistent, but the planer was a needless step. Lots of short or going to be short strips due to knots and other voids. If I run short I'll rip some more strips. Got my router setup ready to bead the strips. I through together a feather board. It may be ugly, but it was quick and it does work.

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                      #25
                      Roy ! A tip that will improve the consistency of your strips when bead and coving, is to run them Between the fence and the router bit ! First pass will uniform them ! Uniformity is the key !

                      What trouble did you have with the Skilsaw cutting strips ?

                      Jim
                      Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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                        #26
                        Between fence and bit,.. I didn't think about that. Thank you. In regards to the skill saw, it just wouldn't glide along smoothly. Felt like I was twisting it. I destroyed one blade cause I cut through a miss placed nail. I think I need more practice with a skill saw. I don't use one very often.

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                          #27
                          It sounds possible that your skil saw troubles may have been due to the clamped on fence being out of parallel with the blade? Just a thought for next time. You're on your way and doing well! Thanks for posting your build. I'm enjoying following along!

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                            #28
                            On my early canoes, I wore out a few Skil brand saws, because they were under powered. Then I bought a 13 AMP Makita, and it's still going strong !

                            A Freud Diablo ( $10) is as good as they get . 24 Teeth.

                            As Rick said you need the fence adjusted Parallel to the blade. I use a caliper for this !

                            a link that might be helpful page 3.

                            http://www.canoetripping.net/forums/...cutting-strips

                            Jim
                            Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
                              As Rick said you need the fence adjusted Parallel to the blade. I use a caliper for this !
                              Since you have a planer, I use a nice planed strip to get the spacing between the fence and blade. For 1/4" strips you need one that is a little more than that to account for the blade teeth.

                              mark

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                                #30
                                I lower the blade to the deepest cut. Then measure front and back spacing, between the blade and fence. Make them the same. As Mark says a little over 1/4"

                                Jim
                                Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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