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"Mighty" Dease River, British Columbia, 2003

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    "Mighty" Dease River, British Columbia, 2003

    I have been scanning slides of previous trips, and am now working on our Dease River trip from 2003, which Kathleen and I organized, and somewhat led. We went with eight other people, two of whom lived in California at the time. Our trip planning and logistics were carried out by email. I still have all that material, and am in the process of creating a file, including images, to send to the other trip participants. I thought I would also share this trip with the canoetripping.net site.


    The following is from Wikipedia: "The Dease River flows through northwestern British Columbia, Canada and is a tributary of the Liard River. The river descends from Dease Lake, though its ultimate origin is in the headwaters of Little Dease Creek at Snow Peak, approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of the lake. The river flows 265 kilometres (165 mi) generally north-eastward, draining into the Liard River near Lower Post, British Columbia. Large sections of the river parallel the Cassiar Highway, helping to make it a popular destination for canoeists, kayakers, and rafters.


    The area has a rich history. It is important to the history of Tahltan and Kaska First Nations, who continue to reside along the river. The first European known to have visited the river was John McLeod, a Hudson's Bay Company fur trader and explorer, in August 1831. He named the river for Peter Warren Dease, at the time Chief factor of the Mackenzie River District of the Hudson's Bay Company. In 1837, Robert Campbell established a Hudson's Bay Company fur trading post at Dease Lake. The community of Dease Lake has a population of approximately 650, and is the major centre in the river's watershed."


    As a bit of background, my childhood friend, Bill Owens, from Sacramento, California, contacted me in 2002, saying that he wanted to go on a wilderness canoe trip. He would also be brining along his friend, Chuck. I decided that the Dease River in northwestern British Columbia would be the most appropriate for Owens and Chuck, who had virtually no canoeing experience. There were only a few rapids along the way, generally rated no higher than Class II. With a little practice, Owens and Chuck should be able to handle it. For this trip, Chuck paddled under the alias of Pierre LeChuck. Both Owens and Pierre always referred to the Dease as the “Mighty Dease.”


    Greg, Cheryl, Sean and Allana joined our group a few months later, followed soon after by Don and Laura. Our group now numbered ten, counting Kathleen and me. Planning for the trip was complicated by the fact that Owens and Pierre lived in California, while the rest of us lived in the Vancouver area of British Columbia.We planned this trip primarily through exchanges of email.


    I prepared and distributed a tentative itinerary to confirm that the trip was doable and comfortable. I planned 15 days for the trip, covering 308 km (191 miles).


    Owens and Pierre were not able to find a canoe course where they lived in California. Kathleen and I had two 16-foot Mad River Explorers. After Owens and Pierre arrived in Vancouver, we spent one day practicing paddling skills on the ocean water of Deep Cove, only 30 minutes from our home. Owens and Pierre had a good time paddling in and out, and around pier pilings. Also enjoyed trying to paddle close along a shore line. The next day we drove to the Mamquam River, an easy Class I, with a couple of riffles. Pierre and I paddled together, as did Owens and Kathleen. Pierre and I capsized in one of those riffles. Pierre demonstrated a very strong self rescue, which was good to see. My Tilley hat floated free, and I called out to Kathleen, “Get my Tilley hat!” But, alas. It sank, despite that little piece of foam nestled in the top of the hat. A big loss.


    We also learned that our 16-foot Explorer was too small for Owens and Pierre. Owens is a regular-sized kind of guy. Pierre, on the other hand, is a big man. We decided to rent a 17.5-foot Old Town Tripper from our friends Cathy and James, whose boat also came with a spray deck.





    Last edited by PaddlingPitt; 10-12-2019, 04:23 AM.

    #2
    Oh boy, I'm so excited for another tag-along adventure!

    Your pictures aren't showing up on my computer.

    Alan

    Comment


      #3
      I have enjoyed every post you have written so far. I too, am excited for another of your wonderful stories.
      "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

      Comment


        #4
        Alan,

        The images appear on my computer, but not on my iPad. They also do not appear on Kathleen's iPad. I don't know what the problem could be. I am downloading from google photos, just like I always have before. Do they appear for you, Boreal Birch? I think maybe some of them might be too large. I will go back, edit them out, and then download some smaller versions of the image. Hope that works.

        Comment


          #5
          That worked for only the two images that I re-did. I will try the others.

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            #6
            The pics aren't showing up for me either .

            Jim
            Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
              The pics aren't showing up for me either .

              Jim
              They should be showing up now, Jim. I replaced them all, and they show up on my iPad and Kathleen’s iPad. When’s the last time you checked?

              Comment


                #8
                Looking forward to the rest of the story but no photos here on my IPhone, I Pad or a chrome based tablet

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Canoedog View Post
                  Looking forward to the rest of the story but no photos here on my IPhone, I Pad or a chrome based tablet
                  This is worrisome. We can see the images on our iPads now. Is it possible that you’re looking at an older, unrefreshed posting. If not, I don’t have any answers or solutions right now.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I logged out, logged back in, still no pics.

                    Comment


                      #11



                      Last edited by PaddlingPitt; 10-11-2019, 09:43 PM. Reason: Deleting the images to see if this released my other previous images.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        No original pics, but yup, that last posting works. BTW I'm enjoying the Saga of the Mighty Dease TR. !

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by memaquay View Post
                          I logged out, logged back in, still no pics.
                          Mem,

                          You can log out, and log back in, but still be on the same page as when you logged out. Have you tried refreshing the page, or closing the website, and then re-opening anew?

                          Comment


                            #14

                            .


                            Last edited by PaddlingPitt; 10-11-2019, 09:45 PM. Reason: Deleting the images to see if it releases my other previously posted images.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Nope, sorry, no pics again.
                              I just checked a satellite image of Dease Lake and it looks like Pierre & Willie are gonna get a lot of paddling practise.

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