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    New legislation affects canvas hot tent users.

    I took my baker tent to the local tent manufacturer for some repairs and to have another stovepipe jack installed. To my disappointment they told me they were no longer able to install a stovepipe jack in a tent that they didn't manufacture themselves. They said I would have to install it at home myself.

    #2
    So what is the legislation? The majority of of this stuff is covered by state laws so it would be useful to know as it may well not apply outside your home state and of course doesn't apply to those of us in Canada or elsewhere on the planet.

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      #3
      I didn't get any other details, but I will when I pick the tent up next week some time.

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        #4
        Thanks

        Your post made me look online and I found out they updating the Canadian standard right now but it doesn't say anything about repairs.

        t may be that they are unwilling to work on anything when they don't know if the fabric has been treated. You could always get them to sew velcro around the opening and then make yourself a new stove jack to apply on top

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          #5
          Well, I spoke with the guy in charge at the tent shop and he told me that it was a new company policy. They don't want the liability for installing a stovepipe jack in a tent that is not fire resistant. The girl I spoke with previously made it sound like the rule had come from a higher authority, and I guess it was, her boss.

          I'm sorry for all of the panic and anxiety this must have caused all you hot tent users out there. BTW they did install the stovepipe jack for me, unfortunately not where I wanted it.

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            #6
            Thanks

            That's a real "Good News/Bad News" story! I do install stove jacks for folk but it only really makes sense if you are local to me. I have the silicone high temp fabric for sale on my website for anyone wanting to DIY.

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              #7
              Thanks BV that's good to know. Can that be sewed on with a regular sewing machine or do you need something industrial?

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                #8
                Hey, winter camping is the last "Wild West" of outdoor activities. Where we go, there are no people, we bring guns, fishing stuff and booze and greasy man food. No gubernment is gonna tell me anything about winter camping, they can come try to find me. Just kidd'n, glad to hear it all worked out, well, sort of worked out.

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                  #9
                  I’m hoping you can give me some advice, BV. I have a stove jack that has some tears in it. I was thinking of “gluing” them back together with that red, high-temperature silicone sealant. I have visited your site, and seen the jack material that you sell. Kathleen sewed our jack, but it wasn’t easy to get the Woods tent into the sewing machine. We would prefer to repair with the high-temperature silicone. Any thoughts?

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                    #10
                    Sorry, meant to reply but went camping!

                    The high temp silicone fabric is easy to sew on a home machine, use a 90/14 needle or bigger, but like you say the big problem is getting the fabric under the foot and then manoeuvering it around. Some smaller machines don't have enough space under the foot to work properly though the good old fashioned machines are just fine.I try to make sure I have plenty of tables set up around the side and back of the machine to support fabric. It also helps to roll the fabric up neatly to make feeding it through the machine go more smoothly.

                    You could use a silicone sealant to stick a new stove jack on top, reinforcing it with snaps, chicago bolts or even snap rivets at the corners. Sticking the stove jack down before sewing is a good idea anyway instead of pinning.

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                      #11
                      When I downsized my 8x10 wall tent to a smaller size I also cut down my wood stove and went from a 5" pipe to a 4" pipe. The first pic shows how poorly the pipe fit the fiberglass jack. The second pic shows a better fit after I cut two cookie sheets to fit the 4" stove pipe and bolted them inside and out to the fiberglass jack.

                      I was able to sew that jack onto the front of the tent with my home sewing machine.



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                        #12
                        Definitely one of the benefits of having the stove jack in the door, much less fabric to deal with.

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                          #13
                          Thanks Bothwell and Robin. Below is my tent.



                          Below is a close up of the left hand side of the stove jack. As you can see, there is a tear in the upper left. Would it be advisable to fix it with just the high temperature sealant to "glue" the tear, or should I install a new jack? There is also charring of the jack material where it has been in contact with the pipe. Is this a problem?



                          Below is a vies of the other side, also with a tear, on middle right. Same question.

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                            #14
                            That's far enough away from the pipe that even standard silcone would be enough to stop it fraying. Apply some silicone to the edges to stop fraying, sew a zig zag by hand then some more silicone.

                            It's a remote possibility but I would move that rolled cover. If the ties come undone the fabric will drop down on to the pipe.

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                              #15
                              I have to take my tent back to the tent store today. They replaced my 5" stove jack with a four inch. I am hoping that he will put the new one where I wanted it and leave the four inch one in place. I'd be willing to buy a 5' one if he'd install it for free.

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