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    PLUMB Axe

    This sadly neglected axe belonged to my grandfather, who gave it to my dad. It's now mine. It's been sitting in a shed for long time and looks rough. I know there are some pretty sharp axe experts on this forum, what can you tell me about it? The only markings are on the head. It says "PLUMB" with the number "32" above the name. The total length is 28.5" Is this worth sharpening up and doing some restoration work on the handle? The head seems to be firmly attached to the handle and the handle, despite its appearance, seems sound. Is this an appropriate axe to take on on a canoe trip?
    Last edited by alsg; 03-23-2018, 11:35 AM.

    #2
    I'm not a real axe guy so I googled it and came up with this: http://www.yesteryearstools.com/Yest...umb%20Co..html. I hope someone can answer your question(s). Nice looking axe!

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      #3
      Thanks for that link. It seems that my axe head is attached with a red epoxy called Permabond, and that dates this axe to no earlier than 1956. Younger than what I would have expected.

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        #4
        Sounds like a great family Heirloom ! Worth restoring and passing on!
        Maybe one day an offspring will say "This ax belonged to my Great Great Grand Dad" that would be cool !

        Jim

        Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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          #5
          I remember them from the 1970s, perhaps later, with the epoxy attachment.

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            #6
            that's plumb wonderful

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              #7
              Lots of Plumb information on the Blade Forums

              https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/...hread.1066763/

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                #8
                At 28.5 " long it seems a bit too much axe for a canoe trip, though from where I'm standing it's hard to tell how much it weighs. Maybe 2-3 lbs? A bit heavy for tripping. With a well secured handle and the family history I'd absolutely recommend restoring this to its former glory, and if having an heirloom accompany you on a trip, no matter the size and weight, I'd say find a special place for it lashed to your canoe pack. Blades are a personal thing, you're lucky to have your grandad's / dad's axe. Please show us how the restoration turns out! And if it takes a canoe trip with you, please provide pics!!

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                  #9
                  The handle doesn't look bad, I'd replace the head.

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                    #10
                    Well, the first step is underway Four hours in an Evapo-Rust bath and here's the result. You can see the remnants of a sticker that must have been there at one point. But I am a little disturbed to see that the heat treated area (darker area toward the edge) doesn't extend the whole length of the bit. Maybe this is a clunker?

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                      #11
                      Well, I've learned from the Blade Forum that Mike McRea mentioned that the axe "3 2" marking means the head is 3&1/2 lbs. I'll weigh the whole thing at some point.

                      Folks at the Blade Forum seem to think there's nothing wrong with the head or heat treatment, so I'll try to sharpen it up. Having no experience sharpening anything other than chisels and plane blades, this will be interesting.

                      As for the handle, I'm undecided on how much to try to restore it. The original red paint/dye has chipped off in many places leaving a vague pink color. I could take it down to bare wood and re-stain it. Or I could give it a light sanding to remove anything loose, and just apply some pure tung oil to protect the exposed wood. Decisions, decisions.

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                        #12
                        Yeah I'd be careful bringing a pink axe on group trips.

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                          #13
                          I rec'd a Plumb hand ax for Xmas when I was 16. Good balance,easily packable and held an edge. 20 yrs later it disappeared during a work related move. United Van Lines wouldn't replace it because it wasn't specifically listed on the item inventory. Still fondly remember that little ax. .
                          ...better to be up the creek without a paddle than not be on the water at all!!!

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                            #14
                            To answers a few question, yes I would bring that on a trip but wouldn't let any one use it... Second if the head and the handle are solidly attached together then I would leave it. Regarding the heat treatment, axe are usually done that way, that is why you should not use an axe as a sledge it could deform the eye and then get the head loose. Look like a good axe!

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                              #15
                              I would use that baby in a heartbeat. Good size for tripping. I have cleaned up way worse ones than that.

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