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18th century Beer Bread

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    18th century Beer Bread

    Hey all - In looking over my recipes I actually have two that use beer in making the bread. Both are pretty simple so here you go...

    Recipe #1:
    Ingredients: - 3.5 cups all purpose flour
    - 3 Tablespoons sugar
    - 1 Tablespoon baking powder
    - 1.5 teaspoons salt
    - 12 ounces beer
    - 1 egg, beaten

    Instructions: - Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and pre-heat oven to 375 F degrees.
    - Mix flour, sugar, baking powder and salt in a large mixing bowl.
    - Add the beer (no sips!) and stir with a fork until just combined.
    - Turn the dough onto a floured surface; knead it quickly and shape it into a ball.
    - Place bread on a baking sheet and slit an X on top with a sharp knife.
    - Brush loaf with egg wash and place in oven.
    - Bake until golden brown; around 45 minutes.
    - When done, transfer the bread to a wire rack to cool.

    Recipe #2:
    Ingredients: - 12 ounces of beer; any variety as long as it has alcohol
    - 2 Tablespoons of something really sweet (honey is best, sugar works OK too)
    - 3 cups self rising flour

    Instructions: - Mix the ingredients together.
    - Pour the batter into a lightly greased, pre-heated loaf pan.
    - Bake at 400 F degrees for 50 minutes (give or take...based on your oven).

    This bread works well with a strong porter or stout for the beer and honey as the sweetener.

    That's all for now. I hope you enjoy the bread. Take care and until next time...be well.

    snapper


    #2
    Wonder how maple syrup would work. Have way more of that than honey

    Comment


      #3
      Supposed to snow tomorrow. Great timing for the bread recipe !

      Even thought about putting beer in Alan's bannock mix.
      ​ I can feel the pounds adding to my wasteline right now !
      Thanks !

      Jim
      Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

      Comment


        #4
        I make something similar with home-made sourdough and Guinness beer. I use molasses for the sweetener. Sourdough is really easy to make and to keep, lots of instruction online if you Google for it. I'm using the same starter that I began to grow 5 years ago. After making the dough ball, it is best to let it rise overnight in a relatively cool place to develop flavor, then form into a loaf or boule and let rise again a couple of hours before baking.
        "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

        Comment


          #5
          Sounds like folks are going to enjoy some wonderful bread! I also have a recipe for a boule bread that I got from a French baker I know. It's also a favorite of folks at the living history events but my guess is people just like fresh baked bread that they didn't have to bake

          That's all for now. Take care and until next time...be well.

          snapper

          Comment


            #6
            Sounds yummy! Thanks

            Comment


              #7
              Thanks snapper and yukon. I like breads that require little or (nearly) no kneading, and no proofing. Nice, quick and delicious.
              I'll try these recipes over the holidays. Might have to hide some beer to make bread.

              Comment


                #8
                Every time I try this recipe the beer doesn't make it through to the part where I need to add it. ;-) Seriously sounds delicious.
                Nobody's interested in what you didn't do.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Success!! Following snapper's #2 recipe I added 3/4 tsp of salt and and 4 1/2 tsp of baking powder to 3 cups of all-purpose flour (as an alternative to self-raising flour). I used lavender honey for sweetness. I made a special trip through the Christmas Eve shopping crowds to purchase the last but most vital ingredient. Bell City Brewer's Raven's Heart Stout. And red langford was right. I went through a whole friggin growler to make just one loaf of bread! How does that happen?? I tried to post photos but ran into sizing trouble. No matter.
                  This bread is rich and a bit dense, with a sweet & bitter balance. Nice. But that might be the beer talking.
                  And what is even better, Mrs Chardonnay thinks it tastes "too beery". Perfect. She can keep her dainty hands off my bread and beer, and stick to her itty bitty sandwich things with the crusts cut off.
                  Thanks bakers for your input. This might be my new favourite loaf.
                  Last edited by Odyssey; 12-26-2016, 08:48 AM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Hey all - Haven't been in front of a computer all that much lately. I'm glad this has worked out for you. If anyone else has some bread recipes to share, please feel free to post them. Thanks!

                    Until next time...be well.

                    snapper

                    Comment


                      #11
                      i have a crock containing 5 year old sourdough that I started way back then. Sourdough is really easy to start and keep. Only ingredients are flour and water to keep it alive . You just have to be sure to care for it weekly and to feed it regularly. my wive calls it "the beast".

                      So I begin bread with about a cup and a half of the "mother" starter, add a can of Guinness Stout, then a quarter cup of brown sugar and a quarter cup of molasses, a quarter cup of honey, plus 2 teaspoons of salt, 1 tablespoons of melted butter, one beaten egg, and enough high gluten bread flour to make a soft but firm ball of workable dough. Kneed by machine or by hand (the best way)for at least 10-15 minutes to develop gluten structure.

                      For real sourdough and full flavor, let it rise is a fairly cool place (my basement) for no less than 12 hours ( 18 is better), punch down and form into loafs or boules letting it rise again in a warmer place for a few hours, then when plump, scar the surface with a razor blade, and bake at 350F until internal temperature reaches 200F ( about 45-50 mnutes). Remove from oven and let cool on a rack for 30 minutes before slicing. If you are in a hurry, you can add a tablespoon of commercial dry yeast to the wet mix, then the first rise can be done at room temp for only 3-4 hours, before the second rise. great stuff, especially when warm with butter and a drizzle of honey.
                      Last edited by yknpdlr; 01-03-2017, 04:30 PM.
                      "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Two onions It's also very good and simple.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I like to cook with beer. it adds flavor, breaks down connective tissue and adds CO2. It can be used to make pancakes, stew and lots of other things.
                          I like Irish soda bread. My grandmother used to make pumpkin bread all the time in old coffee cans.
                          Forester

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