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Thread: First time Stripper Build (nervous yet excited)

  1. #41
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    I used Gorilla Glue Wood glue, and my reference book said to refrain from wiping the glue, as it will be harder to get the glue out of the grain. So, I left every last bit of glue on there, until it dried. At first, I tried sanding using 60 grit, with little success. So, I started hand planing it, which evened up a lot of the uneven ridges, but I still can't get all of the glue off. I picked up a scraper today during lunch, and will try and scrap off the rest of the glue, before I go back to the sander. Above, when I mentioned I was going to pick up 120 and 100 grit, i meant I was going for 40 grit, but the store only had 60 and 80, which I all ready have. I'm sitting here at work, and I think some cedar dust just fell from my eye brow! haha
    Good luck with your sanding!!!

  2. #42
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    +1 on the reference book. my dad's a cabinet maker... and he always left the glue alone til it dried... wiping off the excess, in most cases, just smears it around and then you have more sanding to, as you said, get it out of the grain. dense woods, like walnut and maple, he wiped the excess from. open/porous wood, like pine, he left alone.

    He used a piece of steel about 2" x 5" as a scraper, sharpening it when needed with a file. the wide blade kept you from making gouges in the wood, like you might with a paint scraper. I think on a curved surface though, it wouldn't matter.
    Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you. John Muir

  3. #43
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    I used a moistened rag and wiped the glue off on the outside and where I could reach on the inside as I went and had no glue in the grain. I also used a cabinet scraper from Lee Valley tools on the stubborn glue remnants and it worked well, especially on the inside. Just wait until you pull it off the mold and attack the inside...

  4. #44
    I'm guessing you used Gil Gilpatrick's book as a reference. There are better ones out there, such as Ted Moores Canoecraft. There is no problem wiping glue off, if you use regular wood glue. The Gorilla Glue that you used, is it the kind that expands and foams up as it dries? If so, I can understand why you wouldn't wipe it off. However, i would suggest that it is not the best glue for stripping. It's great for using on the trim, etc. Any regular wood glue, the yellow or white stuff is better for stripping, as it can be easily wiped off and saves you a ton of time later. There is no need for a waterproof glue for stripping as everything is covered in fiberglass afterward.

    If you are still having problems, I have a solution for you, but you must be very careful when you do it. They make sandpaper disks for grinders, the kind you use to work on cars with. They consist of multiple layers of sandpaper sandwiched together. They sand very fast. You can get them in 120, I wouldn't go any lower. You must have a deft touch, or you will take too much off, and it is a very dirty business, dust will be flying everywhere. But for a tough job, it will do the trick. I used one to shape my stems, and then tried it on parts of the hull to fair it out. it was very quick, but too dusty for my liking......

    Good luck!

  5. #45
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    I got a kick out of reading this thread again. I have come a long ways, since April. I did a lot of research, watched countless videos, read my how to book, many times, and e-mailed my mentor - maybe one thousand times (thank you for your support). I also figured out how to share photos - I think. You will have to let me know, if it worked. Any way - I have currently applied the sealer coat, and glassed the stems. I am now waiting to fiberglass the hull, with a football shaped piece, then a full sheet. I was going to do it today, but the humidity is too high. I made some mistakes, and the canoe is far from perfect - but, in my eyes - SHE IS PERFECT. Remember, I had to borrow all the tools, and have zero wood working experience, but love the water, adventure, and exploration. I'm super excited, just wait until you the she last few pics. I AM AMAZED!!! (Happy Fathers Day - to all the dads out there)

    https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/sredir?uname=113318878240838203274&target=ALBUM&id =5890090135801284177&authkey=Gv1sRgCITS3dzX8vKAWw& invite=CNja46YK&feat=email

    Last edited by Patchfly; 06-16-2013 at 10:14 AM.

  6. #46
    Looks awesome! That first canoe gives lots of memories and is quite an adventure in the learning curve. You've dome a great job, it looks super.! I usually wet out the football size piece and the main piece at the same time. I cut out the football piece and then carefully roll the main piece over it. If you aren't intending to use the canoe hard, if it's just going to be for lake paddling and not tripping or white water, the football piece isn't even needed. My latest one is ready to fiberglass, and I'm only putting one layer on the outside....it's my honeymoon canoe for the upcoming wedding, only gonna be used on lakes and gentle rivers.

  7. #47
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    Congrats, Patchfly.... it looks great!
    Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you. John Muir

  8. #48
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    Patch,

    It's looking pretty good!!
    Now get it glassed, off the forms and in the water.
    Anyplace special for the maiden voyage?

  9. #49
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    Wow! Patchfly, What a beautiful canoe! Of course it, would be hard to go wrong with that great little helper you have there. This next coming winter will you be making a canoe to fit your son? Very nice work.

    About that Gorilla Glue: the first time I used the stuff (who would have thought there were so many broke gorillas?) I went to their web site and read all about it. Now it sure goes on sticky and after a while is like a rock, but there is a point during the curing process where the foamed out bulge is faintly tacky and and can be popped off using just about anything. The foam has the consistency of popcorn and is very easy to remove. Now, I often get myself in trouble fiddling with things so I made a sample of the glue on a piece of scrap wood that I could test to determine when it was ready to "pop" off. Maybe you might try it on your next project.

    Best Wishes, Rob

  10. #50
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    Thanks - I still can't believe, I have done this and made it this far. I can't wait to glass it, and get it off the forms and start on the inside. Just need a low humidity day to glass the hull. As for maiden voyage, for starters, I'll probably take her to the canal, just to make sure she floats. If all goes well - I would have to imagine - ADK. Stripperguy - any ideas for the maiden voyage???

    Disclaimer - Don't use Gorilla Glue. haha

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