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    #16
    Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
    My concern is that the plastic will degrade.

    I could be wrong, but I'd keep it some where if it leaked, it could be contained, like a 5 gal bucket. Also a place I could easily view it often.

    I have bought quart cans in the past, but don't remember if it was economical !

    Good luck !

    Jim
    I'm not really worried about that Jim. I've had ski base solvent stored in one of these for 15 years and it appears to be the same as the day I filled it from a big jug at the local ski shop. This is one of the other reasons i chose the Gatorade bottles. I keep these kinds of things stored in a cool dark place too.

    the quart cans are $2.75 each and I'm too cheap to spend the extra money on those.

    Mark

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      #17
      Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
      My concern is that the plastic will degrade.

      I could be wrong, but I'd keep it some where if it leaked, it could be contained, like a 5 gal bucket. Also a place I could easily view it often.
      Some years ago I bought a gallon of ZipWax car wash in a plastic jug, way more than we needed or would use quickly, but the price was too good to pass up. Last year I noticed that my shop had an unusual chemical odor and began investigating the shelves with solvents, oils, varnishes and etc.

      Stored inside the shop, with no UV exposure, the plastic ZipWax container had degraded to the point that it was leaking. I decanted what was left into a 2 liter soda bottle, and stored that in a gallon coffee can just in case. So far, so good, but I still have little faith in the long term durability of plastic containers.

      My local hardware store does sell shiny virgin quart cans; I don’t remember the prices, less than $3 IIRC. Unfortunately most of my paints and varnishes are purchased in quart cans. I have started cleaning out old pint and half pint stain cans once the contents are gone and reusing them. That has worked well and I still have a handy can shape to dip a brush into.

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        #18
        Wow, this thread made a comeback ....

        The bags I originally posted are still fine, I just used some of the original Epiphanes that had no skin and also the same for a bag with Helmsman ... these bags are specifically made for this purpose. Plastic degrading IMO is simply that it was poor quality to begin with or is used for something it wasn't intended for. I have had food grade containers fall apart after a year sitting outside (they aren't rated for uV exposure), another example was a jug of windshield fluid, container went brittle after 6 months sitting outside, while a second sat in the shed and was fine.

        Repurposing plastics is pretty dicey as so many look alike, it is difficult to know what the plastic "is" and what it was designed to do ... purchasing for purpose can cost more, so it becomes a cost/benefit in our respective heads, for me, if I am trying to store an expensive varnish like Epiphanes, that is going to skin and ruin in a tin or larger container, I will buy a purpose made bag everytime ... no head space, plastic for purpose and best of all a few years of solid operating results. My buddy gave me some commercial solvent alcohol, it went into a repurposed plastic bottle, it is all about the "What happens if it fails?" question as to how important it is to spend a little on your finish containers.

        As far as using tins, they are stable, but I have also had tins go bad and leak, I suspect most of us have .... plus for finishes like varnish, they pretty much suck for storage of any remaining product, this is true for quite a few of the finishes we use.

        I am not surprised that a ZipWax container failed and leaked all over, the commercial bottles are as cheap as they can be made ... I had a bug spray ("Off") bottle on a shelf in the medicine cabinet, it leaked on to the plastic shelf and melted the shelf ..... so both container and the shelf it landed on was obviously not good for purpose.


        Brian

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          #19
          Originally posted by Cruiser View Post
          The bags I originally posted are still fine, I just used some of the original Epiphanes that had no skin and also the same for a bag with Helmsman ... these bags are specifically made for this purpose.
          I do like the plastic-purposed bags, or the Gatoraide bottles if they work, for one “I’m sloppy” purpose.

          I do not like carrying around even a quart can, top off and open, as I am working. More prolonged exposure to air, and a bigger mess if I eff up and slippery fingered drop it*, so I try to decant an appropriate amount into a smaller working container and put the lid back on. And of course rolling requires filling the pan.

          If there is one place I am all but guaranteed to get extra messy it is trying to decant something from a full can. Way too much, way too everydamnwhere, including inside the can rim (and on the bench, and my shoes. . . .)

          Instead of pouring I dip cupfuls from the can and pour that into another container. Perhaps there is some other trick to that?

          A follow-up question – if there is wet paint or varnish or etc in the can rim how do folks clean it out before putting the lid back on? When I try to run a rag or swab around the rim I just chase it in circles, and half of it drips down the outside of the can.

          *Maybe childhood trauma. I dropped a nearly full quart of black paint on the floor of my father’s shop as a youngster. It exploded everywhere. My first thought was “I’m dead”. My second and third thoughts were “Clean this up as best I can” and “Bury my clothes out in the woods so mom doesn’t know”

          Neither plan was entirely successful.

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            #20
            I've been using that stuff and it seems to work pretty good https://www.leevalley.com/en-ca/shop...inish-preserve... But I like the bag idea too!!

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              #21
              A follow-up question – if there is wet paint or varnish or etc in the can rim how do folks clean it out before putting the lid back on? When I try to run a rag or swab around the rim I just chase it in circles, and half of it drips down the outside of the can.
              It's probably a no-no but pretty much any can I open gets a ring of holes either drilled or poked with the corner of a straight screwdriver so that the spillage in the lip drains back into the can.

              Alan

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                #22
                Originally posted by Mike McCrea View Post

                If there is one place I am all but guaranteed to get extra messy it is trying to decant something from a full can. Way too much, way too everydamnwhere, including inside the can rim (and on the bench, and my shoes. . . .)

                Instead of pouring I dip cupfuls from the can and pour that into another container. Perhaps there is some other trick to that?

                A follow-up question – if there is wet paint or varnish or etc in the can rim how do folks clean it out before putting the lid back on? When I try to run a rag or swab around the rim I just chase it in circles, and half of it drips down the outside of the can.
                On this gallon can i removed the lid and drilled two holes on opposite sides. Replace lid and it will pour in a stream into a funnel. If you want to save the can, i suggest saving a different quart can lid, drill holes and keep it for future use.

                For the can rim I punch holes in the channel so the liquid drains back in. Its my understanding that the can is sealed by the outside of the rim. This is how I've done it and it seems to work.

                Mark

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                  #23
                  A few years back, I left unmixed resin in a plastic drinking cup. Thinking it would be OK, until I glassed again.

                  About a week later I noticed resin dripping from my resin mixing station.

                  The resin had softened the cup and it leaked.

                  Since then I have been leary of leaving resin in plastic cups, very long.

                  I've never had those same cups leak mixed resin, even when left over resin kicked !

                  Glad to hear Gator aid bottles can hold varnish !

                  Thanks Mark !

                  Jim
                  Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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                    #24
                    I'll just say that I assume the Gatorade bottles will hold the varnish long term. That is the experiment and I'll post to this thread with updates.

                    mark

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                      #25
                      Over the years I've saved various sizes of wide-mouth glass jars to keep leftover paint and varnish when the original can gets less than half full and the air inside might cause some surface skin to form... pickle jars, relish jars, olive jars, all sizes so the contents fill the jar full, with very little air. All glass and no fear of solvents dissolving that The metal screw-top lid might stick and refuse to turn but a paint can lid removal tool will loosen it.

                      The main problem with glass jars is having the right size available for the quantity of paint needing to be saved so space is needed to keep a good selection of sizes. People will think insane glass jar hoarder when the see the shelves full of empty jars, well, never mind that, you can always explain that away by saying each jar contains air collected from remote parts of the world.

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