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    #16
    Turtle There is some movement but with a shaped thwart very little

    Glenn MacGrady Your reasoning infers the canoe is empty. Does it also apply to a load tripping canoe? I have a Swift Prospector 16 that I could adjust the load better if I did not have the Rear Seat up in front and just add another thwart.

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      #17
      Glenn MacGrady ,

      My own empirical evidence says I've had pretty good control. Also, I wasn't referring to a bastardized tandem. I was saying that there would be a load in addition to a paddler (who is me, solo).
      1000 Solo Miles through the Wilderness
      1-35 Allegheny R
      36-88 Au Sable R
      89-?

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        #18
        Originally posted by yetii View Post
        My own empirical evidence says I've had pretty good control. Also, I wasn't referring to a bastardized tandem. I was saying that there would be a load in addition to a paddler (who is me, solo).
        No doubt my paddling proclivities and preferences are peculiar, and I am admittedly an inveterate boat tinkerer who can’t leave well enough (but not perfect) alone, but I have moved the seat, or seats, on half the canoes we have owned over the years.

        Most often a bit sternward on solo boats, to better accommodate some personal cab-forward physique. But also on a few tandems, either where the bow seat position, for a usual-pair trim, seemed awkwardly located, or positioning a new (wider) seat stern seat forward a bit, to replace one set so OEM far back in the stem that my ass barely fit. Seriously, 18+ feet of tandem tripping canoe and I have a stern seat designed for Twiggy?

        Not all were moved to accommodate my sweet spot; I customized the seat placement in two canoes to fit each of my sons, think beanpole vs O-lineman. I pretty much know how far back of center I want a solo seat, and it was easy to figure out where their seats went with them day-loaded and paddling at the existing seat location, shifting fore and aft a touch.

        On an existing solo canoe my best “center” seat it is most often a matter of a few inches variance from OEM. That few inches matters to me. As Glenn points out

        Originally posted by Glenn MacGrady View Post
        This occurs when -- to use simplistic terminology -- the center of gravity is over the canoe's pivot point. In a canoe empty of gear, this occurs in most solo canoes when the center seat is about 6"-9" behind the pivot point, depending on whether you are a sitter or kneeler and your size and weight.
        My 9” behind center COG may be someone else’s 6” behind center. Factor in that I rarely kneel, vs folks who usually kneel. I rarely (never) paddle in a canoe totally empty of gear, even on day trips I have some stuff along; lunch and spare clothes bag, throw rope and bailer, spare paddle, canteens, day use essential bag. Probably a cooler with ice, food and beverages.

        Those couple or three inches matter to me.

        If you paddle a designed solo canoe with a dog companion of any size, good luck; get ready to move that seat.

        My preference would be to trim the canoe a touch bow light with my usual day paddling load, knowing that I can further trim as desired for the winds with gear weight when tripping.

        If “bastardized” means a soloized 16’ tandem I will happily paddle that big-boy, big-load tripper, with a single seat exactly where it want it, and thwarts exactly where I want them for gear storage, without a superfluous seat in the way.

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