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Waterproofing a Blue Barrel

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    #16
    Originally posted by memaquay View Post
    The following statement is what I do, not to be taken as advice.

    Yes, my food, clothes, sleeping bag, mattress, every thing goes in the barrel, except fuel, if I bring some kind of fuel operated stove. That goes in the day pack. I know people will tell you that is a big no-no, but I'm not travelling in Grizzly land, and I'm not bringing steaks. Food is all dry in separate packs in the barrel. I have seen many bears, but only ever had one in camp, which was quickly dispatched with a bear banger, and I've been wilderness tripping on Northern Ontario for 30 years.

    Don't want to start the big bear debate, but judging by the poll on cleanliness, most people here are going to stink like food and other good things already, lol.

    If you are travelling in a well used park setting where yogi has come to think of people as fast food providers, you might want to carry food in a separate, smaller pack, like a 30 litre barrel or something. Where I travel, the bears that know what humans are associate us with a boom stick.
    O F.
    You made me choke with laughter! Now my Q to you is how do we get to pack on the avoirdupois with such a boring freeze dried menu? This version of WW is not working for me. Maybe I should live on dried food all year.
    Yah I stink.. SO?

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      #17
      "Yes, my food, clothes, sleeping bag, mattress, everything goes in the barrel...most people here are going to stink like food..."
      I can attest to Memequay not caring how he smells in the backcountry. And he knows what he is talking about.
      For a guy who tripped on double smoked bacon, Bailey's Irish Cream and cigarettes he didn't smell half bad.
      No complaints from me.
      Last edited by Odyssey; 01-15-2020, 11:14 AM.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Black_Fly View Post
        Does anyone pack non-food items in a barrel with food?
        No, yes, never, sometimes.

        “No”, I think I think of the barrels as food-only containers. If you count stove and cookware as food, those as well.

        Er, “Sorta yes”; if there is space I put the water filter in the food barrel. And the Trench grill. Still some room left? Collapsible water bucket and Campsuds/scrub brush kit. Maybe a spare roll of toilet paper, or a flask of bourbon. Not food, but “Provision-ish”.

        In any case the barrel is pretty well full. At least at the start of a trip.

        The barrel dilemma is what to do with that emptying hard shell space during a trip. Trash, double bagged and in a coated stuff sack. Maybe the rope bag or big group 1st aid kit when more space develops. Things I’ve figured out that I will never use on this trip (hopefully few). The barrel stays mostly full.

        At the end of a trip, at the take out with the food consumed, before barrel goes back in the truck, I stuff it full as can be with anything I won’t need for the ride home. It all comes out, get cleaned and put away at home; the barrel might as well be packed solid.

        The barrel is never getting any smaller, but I appreciate the space as dry bag and pack volume in the canoe slowly decreases, and that the back of the truck is less crowded on the ride home. Especially on companion trips with multiple everything, including barrels

        What was the question again?
        Originally posted by Black_Fly View Post
        Does anyone pack non-food items in a barrel with food?
        I want to change my answer to “Yes”.

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          #19
          Mike, you mentioned putting a piece of screen spline under the gasket to raise the gasket height. Did the gasket stay put after that or did you have to use a few spots of adhesive or what?

          Thanks


          Lance
          Last edited by LanceR; 02-05-2020, 05:17 PM.

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            #20
            Originally posted by LanceR View Post
            Mike, you mentioned putting a piece of screen spline under the gasket to raise the gasket height. Did the gasket stay put after that or did you have to use a few spots of adhesive or what?
            Lance, I mentioned it, as a coulda idea.

            Originally posted by Mike McCrea View Post
            I could, in a pinch, have achieved the same result with a circle of screen window spline underneath the OEM gasket.
            I never actually tried it with an underlay circle of spline. We fixed the leaky compressed gaskets on a couple barrels by putting, in some cases considerably stretching, a rubber O ring taken from 5-gallon screw top pails, placed below the existing smushed gasket to raise it up a bit. Those thin O-rings were spline sized and spline is ubiquitously available; I rescreen a couple doors and windows every year, so have various diameter spline leftovers in the shop.

            I suspect (please do test if you have leaky barrels) that putting a circle of screen spline, simply laid full round under the existing gasket will work. The top is clamped down, not twist screwed down, so a circle of un-adhered spline should not move if placed below the old gasket.

            Knowing that they may eventually need replacement/augmentation/attention, I’d avoid adhering the gaskets in place.

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              #21
              Thanks, Mike

              We're at 3-1/2" plus of rain today with a lot more on the way so I'm not going to play outside today. The rain gauge holds 5" and I'm hoping to not have to empty it before the rain ends. When the concrete slab outside the basement doors is dry and I can see leaks I'm give a loop of spline a try. I figure the gasket needs to conform around the spline to fully seal so I'll start with the smallest spline I have, 1/8". I'll post the results.

              Best regards to all,


              Lance

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