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Trapper Nelson Indian pack boards

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  • Canotrouge
    replied
    Originally posted by Patrick Corry View Post
    Here’s what I used in my youth. We wrapped our gear in an Army surplus poncho, then diamond-hitched the load to these packboards. My scout troop had several dozen of ‘em.

    https://www.omahas.com/shop/ww2-packboard/
    I have a friend that uses those for packing meat out on moose hunting trips.... They work!

    Leave a comment:


  • Patrick Corry
    replied
    Here’s what I used in my youth. We wrapped our gear in an Army surplus poncho, then diamond-hitched the load to these packboards. My scout troop had several dozen of ‘em.

    https://www.omahas.com/shop/ww2-packboard/

    Leave a comment:


  • VernAK
    replied
    My Trapper Nelson is still in good condition but I use it as a display for Dall Sheep horns and am old coffee pot......looks good on the wall.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boatman53
    replied
    Will do Canotrouge. I have plenty of Ash already and I’m sure I can find a 2x4 or two for the mold and all the steaming gear is on hand.
    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • memaquay
    replied
    Looks like an awesome packboard! We used to use them to carry 12 x 14 prospector tents, plus chainsaws and gas. I've got an idea that yours would be a lot more comfortable than the ones we made out of hockey sticks, back when hockey sticks were still made out of wood.

    Leave a comment:


  • sweeper
    replied
    "http://www.canoetripping.net/forums/...ated-retailers", for craftsmen that produce canoe related items for sale.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canotrouge
    replied
    Originally posted by sweeper View Post
    Looking forward to you taking this to the "Small scale site related retailers" forum.

    Very nice job.
    I don't think I understand what you are saying... Sorry... Lost in translation

    Leave a comment:


  • Canotrouge
    replied
    Originally posted by Boreal Birch View Post
    Back in the last half of 1967 or the first half of 1968 I found a Alaska Sleeping Bag catalog somewhere. I started ordering stuff, a sleeping bag that was warm to -40 degrees F. or C. and a Trapper Nelson Indian Pack. I had them shipped to my parents home in Northern Minnesota. As a military man serving at a little radar site in the northern part of South Vietnam I needed something to look forward to. I believed then as I do now that tomorrow is going to to be a good day, looking forward to going home was something we all did, but I specifically was looking forward to going on a canoe trip to catch a Lake Trout. In those days I was getting paid, but had no place to spend money, other than the buying postal money orders, so that is what I did ordering things that I would need for that trip. The Trapper Nelson Indian Pack was not very good for canoe tripping, it didn't mesh very well with portaging a canoe, so I traded it to my mentor Bob for a #3 Duluth Pack which I still have and use. The -40 degree sleeping bag was much to warm for summer canoe trips, Plus it maybe weighed about 25 pounds, so I traded it away to a friend of mine that was a logger that spent his winters in drafty tar paper logging shacks. He still claims it was the best bed he ever had.
    Thank you Canotrouge for bringing back to my mind a 50+ year old memory that I had forgotten. Looks like a good project, I think a your pack board will be great for backing out those moose quarters next fall. If I were going to do any moose packing I would revive my old Trailwise pack frame, it had a hip belt that made packing heavy loads almost easy.
    That is a great story!! I use a tumpline wen ever I need to pack something heavy rather than a hip belt, seems to work better for me on short trips anyway!!

    Leave a comment:


  • sweeper
    replied
    Looking forward to you taking this to the "Small scale site related retailers" forum.

    Very nice job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Shearwater
    replied
    Bought this trapper nelson in the late 60s as it was the only real workhorse pack in northern B.C. We used to have contests to see who could carry the largest load. I never won but I did see a fellow carry a large cast-iron stove with one! I still use it on occasion just for old-times sake.
    Last edited by Shearwater; 11-01-2019, 12:27 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boreal Birch
    replied
    Back in the last half of 1967 or the first half of 1968 I found a Alaska Sleeping Bag catalog somewhere. I started ordering stuff, a sleeping bag that was warm to -40 degrees F. or C. and a Trapper Nelson Indian Pack. I had them shipped to my parents home in Northern Minnesota. As a military man serving at a little radar site in the northern part of South Vietnam I needed something to look forward to. I believed then as I do now that tomorrow is going to to be a good day, looking forward to going home was something we all did, but I specifically was looking forward to going on a canoe trip to catch a Lake Trout. In those days I was getting paid, but had no place to spend money, other than the buying postal money orders, so that is what I did ordering things that I would need for that trip. The Trapper Nelson Indian Pack was not very good for canoe tripping, it didn't mesh very well with portaging a canoe, so I traded it to my mentor Bob for a #3 Duluth Pack which I still have and use. The -40 degree sleeping bag was much to warm for summer canoe trips, Plus it maybe weighed about 25 pounds, so I traded it away to a friend of mine that was a logger that spent his winters in drafty tar paper logging shacks. He still claims it was the best bed he ever had.
    Thank you Canotrouge for bringing back to my mind a 50+ year old memory that I had forgotten. Looks like a good project, I think a your pack board will be great for backing out those moose quarters next fall. If I were going to do any moose packing I would revive my old Trailwise pack frame, it had a hip belt that made packing heavy loads almost easy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canotrouge
    replied
    The Gil Gilpatrick frame looks nice, but more complicated than needed in my opinion, to get the shape right to make it comfortable would be tricky in my experience! I like the simplicity of the Trapper Nelson frame, super simple and some what faster to make, light weight and really versatile!!
    But if you guys make one please share

    Leave a comment:


  • alsg
    replied
    Originally posted by Boatman53 View Post
    Alsg, I’m sure that is the same plan as from the book I referenced as it’s from the same author.
    Jim
    I just looked it up and yes, it appears that yours is an earlier book from the same author so I'm sure it is the same plan as I referred to.

    Leave a comment:


  • Canotrouge
    replied
    Originally posted by Jim Dodd View Post
    Great post Canptrouge !

    This looks like a great winter project and useful !

    I really like the idea of lashing it together ! Effective and traditional ! Besides I've run pretty low on epoxy.

    Looking forward to seeing the finished pack with bag and straps !


    Thanks !

    Jim
    Traditionally they were riveted together... Steel rivets, really weird! But I guess it was faster than mortise, tenon and then lashing!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jim Dodd
    replied
    Great post Canotrouge !

    This looks like a great winter project and useful !

    I really like the idea of lashing it together ! Effective and traditional ! Besides I've run pretty low on epoxy.

    Looking forward to seeing the finished pack with bag and straps !


    Thanks !

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Dodd; 10-29-2019, 10:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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