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Throwing line over a tree limb, and a recent revelation

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    #31
    Originally posted by Odyssey View Post

    Like a girl.

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      #32
      Throwing ropes over tree branches on the west coast at sea level (we paddle on the ocean) is a nightmare. Just wandering thrugh the forest is difficult. Then comes the problem of finding a branch that is low enough to reach. If there is one, it's often cluttered with other foliage so a rope will not easily pass over it and down the other side. Finally, on these big trees, low branches are often moss covered (i.e. rotten) or just too thin to hold the weight of a food bag.

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        #33
        DIY Throw Ball, AKA Mark II tennis ball.

        Originally posted by Mike McCrea View Post
        I need to add a ring to the tennis ball and try using that, but I’m kinda stumped. I could use a small eye bolt, with a washer and nut inside the ball, but left in place that would preclude playing catch or fetch. Although the ring might be handy on the tennis ball as a place to clip a tarp line.

        Hmmm, I’m thinking a short webbing loop, knotted inside a hole drilled in the slit tennis ball, with a small carabineer attached to the webbing loop for the line to glide through.
        Well dang, that was so simple, easy and cheap I made a couple. I cut usual 1 ½” long slit, so I can squeeze open the tennis ball like a 1950’s lunch money change purse and add some pebbles for weight if needed.

        PC071394 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

        Drill a hole through the tennis ball and push a six inch loop of thin (½” wide) webbing through the hole via the slit. Knot the bitter ends of the webbing outside the slit and pulled the knot into the ball, leaving a 1” webbing loop hanging outside the ball. A loop of rope knotted inside the ball would do just as well

        I played with the drilled hole size a bit, wanting the webbing & knot held firmly inside the tennis ball, but I also wanted to be able to (forcefully) pull the knot through the hole to free the line if the ball itself got hung up or wedged in a forked limb on an errant throw.

        A small carabineer through the loops serves nicely as the ring for the doubled or tripled up throwing line to glide through using the underhand Arborist technique. Plus it’s easy to clip on and off, so I still have a slit tennis ball for tarp pole ends or playing catch/fetch.

        PC071403 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr


        Maybe not so much fetch; my previous slit tennis ball throw weights often ended up dog destroyed on past canine companion trips. Hard to resist dog play when I have a tennis ball.

        Or tarp fetch. A tennis ball tossed up and rolling along the slant of a tarp is a great fetch game, that becomes canine catch as the dog tracks the ball rolling across the tarp and snares it as it drops off the other side. Tons of fun provided you don’t mind dog ball slobber on the tarp.

        Some more practice throwing in the yard and I am like the Mark II tennis ball lots more than the golf ball and eye screw.

        I am making a slit tennis ball and loop to put in each of our tarp stuff bags, and maybe making some as stocking stuffers for tripper friends (Glo-wire line not included).

        I foresee more practice out in the yard when I have the boys back for Christmas. Maybe I should perfect my throwing technique in secret before then.

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          #34
          Tie a fairly heavy carabiner to your rope. Works very well.

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            #35
            This is the first time I've seen this thread. I've used throwlines for a variety of things from climbing trees and rocks to setting hunting tree stands. I don't think I've seen the modified tennis ball idea before but like that it could be made a number of ways and is a multitasker, always a good thing on the trail. Poor Rosie, our coonhound, is going to lose a tennis ball....

            As a practical matter while using a carabiner instead of a knot to attach the throwline to the ball increases the chance of it hanging up in the tree I suspect that the chance is low enough to not matter very much for most canoe tripping or backpacking. If you are throwing your weight into a branch that looks like a wad of barbed wire I suspect that you'd better tie the weight on....

            In line with wanting stuff to multitask as much as possible I'd note that there are a whole bunch of small lightweight carabiners made for climbing that are strong enough for life safety work or for un-pinning a canoe that weigh and cost very little. For example, the Mad Rock Ultra Light in either straight or bent wire gate versions weighs just 1.1 oz (31 G) and costs $6 USD or less. And there are many more similar carabiners although the price may be higher.

            Nancy hangs her hammock with small climbing biners and I keep a few on the top handle of my pack for quickly rigging stuff like hanging things, mechanical advantage pulling systems etc. I already tote a hank of climbing accessory cord for utility cord so it would be silly to not have a few lightweight carabiners along.

            For those who want a turn-key throwline setup just do an online search for "arborist throw bag" or "arborist throwline kit".....

            Best regards to all.


            Lance

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              #36
              when I was seven I got into a heap of trouble by throwing a rock at a sissy boy. Hit him in the ear and required stitches
              The throw was overhand . I am a girl


              Hahahaha...I can just picture that.

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                #37
                I tie my food barrel to a tree with a pot on top as a warning device. It's best to have a clear field of fire between the tent and the barrel. Make it tough for critters to take and give them some incentive not too. I am good with firing a banger at them to start, because I would rather sleep than deal with having to shoot anything. If one is really nervous about it I suppose you could use one of those bear fences to keep animals out too. There are so many better ways than trying to hang food in a tree.

                Not eating in, or keeping food in your tent is a pretty good plan too.

                If you need to get your tarp higher I suppose you could make a bipod out of a couple of long poles and use it to prop your ridgeline up, like the poles for an old style outfitter tent. I dont tarp much so I dont have a lot of issues that way. If I do tarp, I like to use a pole as a ridgeline, especially if I use that site often. Sometimes I even take some long nails and use them to put stuff the way I want it. Where I do like a bit of tarp is in my kitchen area in case it is raining when I get hungry.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by Iskweo View Post
                  If you need to get your tarp higher I suppose you could make a bipod out of a couple of long poles and use it to prop your ridgeline up, like the poles for an old style outfitter tent. I dont tarp much so I dont have a lot of issues that way. If I do tarp, I like to use a pole as a ridgeline, especially if I use that site often.
                  Back when we used a blue poly tarp we had a couple of nestled poles and with a large group-sized poly tarp used them as a 10 or 12 foot tall center pole under a ridgeline. The difficulty was that when a wind gust lofted the tarp the pole would some crashing down with unfortunate results (clonked a friend square on the noggin once).

                  The solution was to embed an eye screw in the pole end, and hook a small beener through the eye. With the beener clipped to the ridgeline the pole could be slid under the tarp and stay vertical even if the tarp lofted.

                  Not an issue even with a big CCS Tundra tarp, the sil-nylon can be tensioned (and re-tensioned) near drum tight, but we still use that pole, eye screw and beener solution at home.

                  We have a couple of outdoor clotheslines that tie into place over the deck or between trees when needed, used for drying clothes and gear or spring cleaning beating the dust out of rugs. Those clotheslines are at about eye-level so it is easy to hang stuff to dry, but will sag lower and lower under wet weight.

                  Beenered pole to the line sag rescue again.

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                    #39
                    I'm liking my blue barrel days...and nights. I have hung it (30 L), but no longer do. Jangly ss carabiners are my early warning device of choice. I also tie the barrel to the tree. And there's the bear bangers too, although I haven't had cause to deploy them yet. I suppose my last line of defence is tripping with an awful choice of food and being a lousy cook. Lol.
                    I dunno. Do black bears like dehydrated panang curry? Eating weirdly might have it's benefits.
                    As far as the ridge rope height goes I'm okay with my rope tethered ss carabiner throw, although I suffer from blurred vision and dizziness ever since an aggressive chick plinked me with a rock when I was a kid. Lol. Being of a physically compact nature I don't need the ridgeline terribly high, 6' will do nicely. That means an easy underhanded throw, just like, you know*, and if need be I reach up with my paddle blade and coax the rope up higher, just to find that perfect branch.

                    *...like one of my Champion softball pitching nieces. In my dreams.
                    Last edited by Odyssey; 01-28-2020, 12:27 PM.

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by Odyssey View Post
                      I'm liking my blue barrel days...and nights. I have hung it (30 L), but no longer do. Jangly ss carabiners are my early warning device of choice. I also tie the barrel to the tree.
                      Same here; I do love a barrel or other hard-side, leak-proof, nibble-proof container.

                      I will hang the garbage bag for convenience while I am present in camp, just to keep it a little protected from rodentia. Not an Ursidae hang; just far enough out and up to keep the squirrels and chipmunks challenged, so I don’t turn around to find my trash scattered far and wide.

                      Originally posted by Odyssey View Post
                      Being of a physically compact nature I don't need the ridgeline terribly high, 6' will do nicely. That means an easy underhanded throw, just like, you know, and if need be I reach up with my paddle blade and coax the rope up higher, just to find that perfect branch.
                      Solo, or even with a companion, I don’t need much more ridgeline headroom than an easy toss will provide, 8’ or so is perfect and still provides some “roof” height at the edges for a chair or gear storage, and the driven-rain side can easily be dropped closer to the ground if necessary. That always seems to be the lake view side, but I’d rather be dry than scenic.

                      But on group trips, with a big assed tarp, a higher peak is more accommodating, especially if you need to drop one side.

                      Not so much for the headroom peak, I have no 10 or 12 foot tall companions, but for more height along the sides. Stuffing a half dozen people under a big tarp it is helpful to have the drainage sloped sides tall enough to back a chair under without the tarp resting on your head, and peaked tall enough that the side entries allow two people to come and go easily without a lot of “After you”, “No, I insist”, “Age before beauty”.

                      Note: The person coming in out of the rain has right of way. Unless the exitee is experiencing Spam and hot pepper gastrointestinal difficulties.

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