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Throwing line over a tree limb, and a recent revelation

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    #16
    Originally posted by memaquay View Post
    I use throw lines all the time... Usually throw underhand too.
    Like a girl.

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      #17
      just kidding
      but he does throw underhand


      here is mem just having fun out back (burning off steam on account of a bad haircut)

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoJW-_OeFtw
      Last edited by Odyssey; 12-04-2018, 04:46 PM.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Odyssey View Post

        Like a girl.
        when I was seven I got into a heap of trouble by throwing a rock at a sissy boy. Hit him in the ear and required stitches
        The throw was overhand . I am a girl

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          #19
          that chainsaw guy is skinnier than me, but I've got more hair, and I use real chainsaws. Sometimes instead of throwing something I just cut the tree down, tie the rope to a branch and then stand the thing back up. Just gotta dig a big enough hole first for the replant. Way easier than swinging that damn weight between my legs.

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            #20
            Originally posted by memaquay View Post
            that chainsaw guy is skinnier than me, but I've got more hair, and I use real chainsaws. Sometimes instead of throwing something I just cut the tree down, tie the rope to a branch and then stand the thing back up. Just gotta dig a big enough hole first for the replant. Way easier than swinging that damn weight between my legs.
            and no doubt ......safer

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              #21
              Originally posted by memaquay View Post
              Way easier than swinging that damn weight between my legs.

              where do I begin

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                #22
                Never heard of the PCT (Pacific Crest Trail) method. Interesting use of a twig "toggle".

                https://i0.wp.com/theultimatehang.co...A-Bear-Bag.png

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                  #23
                  Test throws with golf ball and tennis ball

                  I had a chance to spend some time in the yard practicing with a golf ball and tennis ball throw line using the two techniques shown in the video (1:20 – 2:15)

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFyu8rgRHAQ

                  We have a couple of decent limbs overhanging the yard, some easy and largely bare of small branches, other deeper in the woods some quite occluded. The ground is also thick with fallen leaves and sticks, so after the first throw, when I sent a bunch of debris aloft along with the line, I remembered to go get something on which to flake out the line (100 feet of 3mm cord, which is the ridgeline size on tarps).

                  I thought about using an empty dry bag as a clean surface to flake out the line (meh, straps and buckles) and realized that the back side of the fake grass matt I use in the entry vestibule was perfect, it’s meant to lie on the ground. That clean flake surface goes in the bag of tricks. Oh, yeah, the flake out surface goes best out front, just a few feet back of the limb, so the line is playing out almost straight up.

                  I tried the between the legs two handed \// style throw using the golf ball first. And went back into the shop and installed a larger eye screw in the golf ball; the ball, dangling at the bottom of the vee needs to be able to slide through the ring easily when doubled up.

                  That took some practice and I had to run back into the shop and watch that segment of the video a couple of times to see what I was doing wrong. Ahhhh, duck your hands down to groin level on the backswing, lest you smack your coccyx with a golf ball on the backswing. Not the most intuitive movement, but a lesson quickly learned.

                  But it worked. And it worked very well once I got the hang of it. I think squaring up to the target limb and throwing the initial 9 feet of line with both hands really helps with aim, and loft. As does having a more vertical trajectory with the ball and line, especially with a smaller target area or other limbs/trees in the way nearby.

                  The one handed throw with the tennis ball was less successful, for several reasons. I had go watch the motion on that throw. Note the weird (also un-natural) arm thrust motion when creating the pendulum.

                  Also note that the line is again doubled up (maybe tripled up, can’t tell?) through ring, so the thrower is casting several extra feet of line aloft along with the ball.

                  With just the slit on the tennis ball I could only throw what single length line I had in hand, but once I got the weird arm motion down better it was still pretty effective, more so when I added some pebble weight inside the tennis ball slit.

                  I need to add a ring to the tennis ball and try using that, but I’m kinda stumped. I could use a small eye bolt, with a washer and nut inside the ball, but left in place that would preclude playing catch or fetch. Although the ring might be handy on the tennis ball as a place to clip a tarp line.

                  Hmmm, I’m thinking a short webbing loop, knotted inside a hole drilled in the slit tennis ball, with a small carabineer attached to the webbing loop for the line to glide through. I need more practice (which was kinda fun) with those weird two arm motions so they become more muscle memory; I won’t be able to run back in and watch the video out in the woods.

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                    #24
                    I live on a wooded lot where I had 80' trees growing within 20' of the house. Since 2008, I've removed a dozen of those, plus a few others for friends.There being no landing zone into which the tree could be felled, I climbed the trees and took them down from the top in 6' - 10' sections. At first, to get started with line installation I used a stout fishing rod with 40-lb line and an ounce weight. My shoulder is as old as the rest of me, so I sure wasn't going to throw anything 60' up. With the rod, it took many tries to get the line where I wanted it, but it worked. Then, my nice, light, basswood, canoeing pole broke, and became the backbone for a big sling shot of my own creation. The foot of the 8' long sling-shot rests on the ground. The throwing weight (Mike's bull's testacle) fits into a pocket fashioned from a piece of old dry bag. The sling is powered by pieces of stretchy exercise tubing. This thing will fire the throw weight clear over most trees, and can be accurately aimed. The challenge in using it is how much power to use for the shot--how far to pull back the sling. So, it is a relatively cool toy with which to play, but not so germane to this discussion, since it's not going into the canoe to go camping!

                    Perhaps though, my system of line storage will be useful to rope slingers. The system consists of, a five-gallon bucket. Ta-dah! That (bucket) is something I usually do pack on canoe trips. Start with the tail end of the rope, and do attach it to something so it doesn't fly off with the rest of the rope upon deployment. Then just spool your line into the bucket. Spool isn't the right word--just get the line into the bucket. Then do whatever you need to with the free end--tie on your golf ball, water bottle, stick or what have you--and proceed with installation. The line will play out of the bucket in reverse of how you put it in: LIFO, in accounting terms (Last in, First out). It always amazes me how a rope on the ground becomes tangled in sticks, grass, pine cones, or whatever else is laying there. From the bucket, the line plays out well above the ground clutter. If, by some fluke, your first attempt isn't perfect, retrieve the line and just feed it hand-over-hand into the bucket, and you are ready to try again.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Chip View Post
                      Perhaps though, my system of line storage will be useful to rope slingers. The system consists of, a five-gallon bucket. Ta-dah! That (bucket) is something I usually do pack on canoe trips. Start with the tail end of the rope, and do attach it to something so it doesn't fly off with the rest of the rope upon deployment. Then just spool your line into the bucket. Spool isn't the right word--just get the line into the bucket. Then do whatever you need to with the free end--tie on your golf ball, water bottle, stick or what have you--and proceed with installation. The line will play out of the bucket in reverse of how you put it in: LIFO, in accounting terms (Last in, First out). It always amazes me how a rope on the ground becomes tangled in sticks, grass, pine cones, or whatever else is laying there. From the bucket, the line plays out well above the ground clutter. If, by some fluke, your first attempt isn't perfect, retrieve the line and just feed it hand-over-hand into the bucket, and you are ready to try again.
                      Chip, I really like the bucket idea for flaking out the line, I almost always have a plastic bucket or at least a (wider) collapsible pail. I’ll give that a go next round of yard practice.

                      Originally posted by Chip View Post
                      I climbed the trees and took them down from the top in 6' - 10' sections. At first, to get started with line installation I used a stout fishing rod with 40-lb line and an ounce weight. My shoulder is as old as the rest of me, so I sure wasn't going to throw anything 60' up. With the rod, it took many tries to get the line where I wanted it, but it worked. Then, my nice, light, basswood, canoeing pole broke, and became the backbone for a big sling shot of my own creation. The foot of the 8' long sling-shot rests on the ground. The throwing weight (Mike's bull's testacle) fits into a pocket fashioned from a piece of old dry bag. The sling is powered by pieces of stretchy exercise tubing. This thing will fire the throw weight clear over most trees, and can be accurately aimed. The challenge in using it is how much power to use for the shot--how far to pull back the sling. So, it is a relatively cool toy with which to play, but not so germane to this discussion, since it's not going into the canoe to go camping!
                      Ain’t no way I am climbing trees and running a chainsaw, and I no longer carry a fishing pole on trips.

                      Nor a giant slingshot. We had a three-person slingshot called “The Funnelator” , two 3’ long poles with six feet of looped flexible tubing attached to a funnel at the apex of the pulled back V.

                      Two guys holding the poles aloft while the shooter s-t-r-e-t-c-h-e-d the tubing and funnel back near ground level. It would fire a sizeable weight 100 yard on a line drive. We once tried playing catch with a softball, and the velocity would knock the gloved receiver off their feet.

                      Water balloons were fun, and even rotten fruit would bust down branches.

                      I realized a couple things while practicing throws out in the yard. I do at times throw limb lines underhanded, especially in the past when throwing some unwieldy chunk of wood or too-heavy but perfectly shaped tie-to rock on high to set a food line. Although even sidearm one-hand I had not used the peculiar Arborist arm motion to get an aimed pendulum swing going. I think maybe the mechanism/motion is important to that throwing technique.

                      Admittedly, with high tosses I have sometimes resorted to doing a full twirling windmill before letting go. Which I know going in rarely ends well in terms of accuracy. Run away, run away!

                      Nowadays I’m not (usually) hanging food; most of my tosses are for large (high) tarp centerlines or other stuff, 15 – 20 feet off the ground. At that distance, especially with some desired tarp orientation, that loop over limb height is less difficult to achieve, but more specific about exactly where and how the line loops over.

                      Another mistake I have often (eh, perhaps usually) made is holding some extra line coiled loosely in my other hand, which pulls the ball laterally off target from where I am aiming, and now seems far less effective than flaking it the line (cleanly) on the ground (or in a bucket!) out directly in front.

                      I also realized that I have seen tripping friends, some far more experienced than me, throw lines hundreds of times, but have never seen (or noticed) either of those Arborist techniques before, even the doubled up rope-through-ring peculiar sidearm motion. And I surely would have noticed the WTF-are-you-doing betwixt the legs style.

                      It seems strange that those throwing techniques – debris clean flake out, pendulum aiming swing, throwing doubled or tripled up line aloft along with the weight, etc – are known and practiced in the arborist community – yet not practiced in the tripping world at large.

                      Trippers throw line over limb for hanging food, tarp lines, other oddball stuff as often as anyone else. Even with short practice I have to believe there is something to learning those techniques.

                      Back to the yard practicing as soon as I make a Mark II tennis ball.

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                        #26
                        the reason for running a rope high and horizontal between trees and throwing a rope over the center of that rope is that any critter can easily climb out a branch to your bag, but a rope not so much.

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                          #27
                          I don't about that the squirrels have a very /easy time running the wires around here.

                          https://www.treehugger.com/natural-s...with-food.html

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                            #28
                            Your right sweeper. We had squirrels get I bags 3 times on scout trips. One was found still in the bag when it was brought down--ever hear boys scream like girls? there are also pictures of bears going out on the horizontal rope. but they usually pull it down before getting to the middle. Some have also figured out to just attack the rope where it's tied to the tree.-smart buggers.

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                              #29
                              I want to try using those techniques for bear bagging. I usually do ok getting the rope over the bear poles in Yellowstone, but sometimes it takes me quite a while. On one trip, a fellow hiker was videoing parts of the hike. He started videoing me trying to throw the rope over the pole. Things didn’t go so well. I nearly took out his knee (not on purpose). I tried again, and it might have been worse. Performance anxiety, I guess. The third hiker graciously came over, grabbed my rock bag and my rope and arced the bag over the pole. For the rest of the trip I just handed him my rope and rock bag. First time, every time. I, on the other hand, need to practice this. Me thinks I should wear a hard hat, though.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by frozentripper View Post
                                A quicker way to hang besides the two-tree method can be to use just one tree with a long rope, maybe 100'. The ground and a tall tree form two sides of a right-angled triangle and the pack is tied onto the rope forming the triangle's third side. The rope is pulled tight, raising the pack off the ground to the right height and location, then the rope is tied off onto a smaller tree.
                                We had a playrope in the yard similar to that for years. We had a bunch of rope swings and such. One was 100 feet of thick rope passed through a forked pin oak trunk 30 feet off the ground. One end was looped over the fork and anchored near the base of the oak, and the other end drooped free in a diagonal arc, 70ish feet of slack rope curving down and tied off a couple feet up another tree. We left the drooped portion of line suspended a several feet off the ground, mostly so I could mow the lawn underneath.

                                It was by far the most dangerous plaything in the yard; one kid would grab the sagged rope with both hands and walk back along the line nearer the tree, reaching up as high as they could. The other kid(s) would then take up the slack, and walking/hauling back as far as they could.

                                The hangee would rise high in the air diagonally, pulled up and away from the oak. A considerable (scary) distance, especially if there was more than one kid on the pull side. They called it “The Elevator”.

                                We called it “The lawsuit waiting to happen”, although they never did keep anyone aloft until their arms gave out (close), and only line dropped a couple of kids on the way down.

                                We convinced a number of adult friends to give it a try; they were less trusting than the younguns and wanted down quicker.

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