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The Compleat Guide to Modern Bear Deterrence

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    #31
    So many have missed the obvious solution....Bear stew with dumplings, OMG!

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      #32
      Your best defense against bears is your brain. Learn their ways, and learn to live with them.
      Forester

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        #33
        At ppine:
        What is your advice for "Learn their ways, and learn to live with them"? I used to live in the Sierra Foothills, and we had the occasional black bear that was pretty much after our trash can. We kept a lock-ring on our can, so the bear would usually lumber off and raid other neighbor's cans. That is, perhaps luckily so, the only experience I have with any bears but hardly situational to wilderness scenarios. Collecting actual experience with bears is typically not desired, so one is left with reading material which may or may not be adequate, appropriate or even correct. I still see information on the great WWW that suggests that one should run downhill when encountering a bear, supposedly because bears aren't able to run downhill! I have never seen a bear run downhill (or uphill for that mater), but I believe they are faster than me at either.

        P.S. I just finished reading "The Twenty-Ninth Day" by Alex Messenger. I don't want to spoil it, but it seems theoretical knowledge on how to behave during a bear encounter is just that. Theory. Anyway, good read of an actual epic canoe trip.
        Just my $0.02 (minus inflation)

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          #34
          I worked in Alaska. We saw bears every day. Look at their body language. Avoid eye contact. Slink away slowly. Leave them an exit. Be on the look out for clacking teeth, growling, huffing and worst of all the bluff charge. Make noise when you travel. Bring a dog as a first line of defense. Carry bear spray. Don't sleep anywhere near food.

          Avoid tall grass and areas with limited visibility. Make plenty of noise. Understand when bears are most active, low light conditions and at night. Be careful not to stumble on one sleeping during the day. Make noise and let him know you are coming. Don't sneak around in the woods. When you go ashore get in the habit of looking around for tracks. If you see tracks don't camp there.

          Some black bears are predatory, mostly young males. Notice their behavior. Some are hard to get rid of. They leave and come back always on your 6, behind you. Loud noise helps, boat horn, firecrackers or warning shots.

          The coastal brownies are huge and territorial, but usual not that aggressive when they are fed on salmon. Watch your step in dense vegetation near streams, like alders.

          At first I carried a .44 mag in Alaska. This was before bear spray. After a couple of close encounters I always carried a big bore rifle. I had the safety off a couple of times, but never fired a warning shot. Try to understand how they think.

          Forester

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            #35
            Originally posted by ppine View Post
            Your best defense against bears is your brain. Learn their ways, and learn to live with them.
            ppine,

            You sign off as “Forester.” I’m just wondering if your nickname on this site refers to Ponderosa Pine, or perhaps Pinyon Pine.

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              #36
              Originally posted by PaddlingPitt View Post

              ppine,

              You sign off as “Forester.” I’m just wondering if your nickname on this site refers to Ponderosa Pine, or perhaps Pinyon Pine.
              Or porcupine

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                #37
                Those electric fences are way more powerful than what i'm familiar with. What kind of battery do they use?

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                  #38
                  The ones I used ran off 2 D cells.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by ppine View Post
                    I worked in Alaska. We saw bears every day. Look at their body language. Avoid eye contact. Slink away slowly. Leave them an exit. Be on the look out for clacking teeth, growling, huffing and worst of all the bluff charge. Make noise when you travel. Bring a dog as a first line of defense. Carry bear spray. Don't sleep anywhere near food.

                    Avoid tall grass and areas with limited visibility. Make plenty of noise. Understand when bears are most active, low light conditions and at night. Be careful not to stumble on one sleeping during the day. Make noise and let him know you are coming. Don't sneak around in the woods. When you go ashore get in the habit of looking around for tracks. If you see tracks don't camp there.

                    Some black bears are predatory, mostly young males. Notice their behavior. Some are hard to get rid of. They leave and come back always on your 6, behind you. Loud noise helps, boat horn, firecrackers or warning shots.

                    The coastal brownies are huge and territorial, but usual not that aggressive when they are fed on salmon. Watch your step in dense vegetation near streams, like alders.

                    At first I carried a .44 mag in Alaska. This was before bear spray. After a couple of close encounters I always carried a big bore rifle. I had the safety off a couple of times, but never fired a warning shot. Try to understand how they think.
                    Thank you for sharing your insights and experiences. I always associated the sneaky from behind move from a cat but less so from a bear.
                    Just my $0.02 (minus inflation)

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                      #40
                      Ppine is short for ponderosa pine, my specialty.
                      Bears are smart and plenty sneaky. They are formidable critters and have equipment. It is a mistake not to respect them. Most are not that dangerous. But some of them are. YOu do not know what order they come in.
                      There are more incidents of people/bear problems in Alaska with black bears than any other kind.
                      Forester

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by ppine View Post
                        There are more incidents of people/bear problems in Alaska with black bears than any other kind.
                        I have an early edition of Herrero’s book, “Bear Attacks,” in which he seeks to describe and explain every documented bear attack in North America. He concluded that Grizzly attacks almost always result from sudden encounters. Black bears, however, will stalk humans. Herrero recommended that if you see the same black bear in your general vicinity throughout the day, it is likely stalking you. I don’t know if he would still make the same generalizations.
                        Last edited by PaddlingPitt; 04-03-2020, 10:40 AM.

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                          #42
                          I would make that generalization any time. They leave and then they come back, always on your 6. They are looking for an opportunity.
                          A friend of mine was doing some timber framing up at Lake Tahoe on the Cal-Neva peninsula. The rich people have big lots and there are lots of big rocks around and den sites. Sam said he saw the same 4 bears every day working on the house. One day a new bear showed up, kind of underweight and beat up looking. Likely a young male, looking a territory. Sam watched the bear for around 2 hours, always hanging around. Finally out of the corner of his eye, Sam could see the bear drop his shoulder and charge right at him. It was a race to the truck. My friend got inside with about 25 yards to spare. He had a pistol but did not use it. This was a predatory attack in broad daylight. I called it in to the Dept of Wildlife.
                          Forester

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