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    Interesting concept

    Poling is the age-old technique for propelling a canoe against rapids or up shallow streams where paddling is ineffective. Standing in the canoe, the paddler uses a straight pole, often 12′ long, to push against the streambed; a skillful poler can make this look graceful and effortless. Preparing for a 2013 through-paddle of the Northern . . .

    #2
    First off ! Welcome to the Site !

    That IS a new one to me ! Pretty Cool !

    Looks like kneeling is the trick for stability ! If I was sitting, and slipped. I'd probably be Wet.

    I see a trace of Graphite on the bottom of that little Koot. Good !

    Are you using ordinary Ski Poles in this video ?

    Jim
    Keep your paddle wet, and your seat dry !

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      #3
      That is not me in the video, but he does state that he is using downhill ski poles with the straps removed. Thank you for the welcome.

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        #4
        Poling with double poles is nothing new, Upper Yukon first nation use to make skin or bark canoes that were use that way in shallow water sitting on the bottom of the shallow flat bottom canoe, they would pole using 2 short poles, similar to a action of double poling in xc skiing!

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          #5
          Looks like a good way to blow a shoulder out.

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            #6
            Been tried by kneeling paddlers.
            It is a good way to overstress joints
            About 25 years ago I first saw it but just a single short pole
            i believe that rice gatherers tandem used this system but don’t have sources handy

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              #7
              Looks interesting indeed. And looks like a lot of work. I'd rather take my canoe for a walk upstream on ropes, even it means I'll get my feet wet.
              Last edited by Odyssey; 02-24-2018, 08:12 PM.

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                #8
                That fellow did the Northern Forest Canoe Trail in 2013 and wrote it up nicely. I've not yet done the NFCT, but I found his website very helpful in planning for "fast & light" trips doing single carries.

                http://users.gmavt.net/petermac/pete...ng.html#poling

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                  #9
                  I don'T see any reason to blow a shoulder or stress joints more than xc skiing double poling....

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                    #10
                    I think I will throw in with Brad on this one....if I cant paddle that I am going to line or wade it.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Canotrouge View Post
                      I don'T see any reason to blow a shoulder or stress joints more than xc skiing double poling....
                      Biomechanics. When you are standing you can lever all our weight against the pole.
                      Newton’s third law is therefore not concentrated on any one joint

                      if you are a luger or ring gymnast you may have the musculature to hold the shoulder in place

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                        #12
                        When I was a teenager I fell in love with Nordic skiing. Most winters I'd see heavy snowstorms transforming the bleary and boring farmland into what I imagined to be Norway. You see, this guy had become my idol https://www.nfb.ca/film/jack_rabbit/. Gosh it was fun!! Bushwhacking at night under the stars was my favourite adventure, setting tracks through field and forest, carving my own trails as I went. A few years later I took my skiing passion to Jack Rabbit's adopted home of Quebec, where I discovered the zeal of groomed trails. Countless hours turned to seasons, and into years, of splendid skiing. I trained hard, often hitting the trails twice daily December through March to get my fix. It was such an addictive sport, all that fresh air and nature, exercise and Zen. There was always so much to practice and learn, and practice some more. One important principle was that of the efficiency of movement through technique, and not simply relying on strength to power propulsion. And good waxing was always important too of course. I was such a nerd about that, carrying a full kit of waxes and klisters, torch and scraper, stripper and rags, cork and sandwiches. Well, gear and lunch all had to go in the same small pack, right? Anyway, double poling was one more technique to utilize along with kicks and skating, to go the fastest, furthest, with the least effort. Pole placement and timing, body position and movement, all had to work in unison and with fluidity. I still remember how that would work out for me. It was often like loose wires, sometimes everything would fall into place and I'd have a few kilometers of a lifetime when all would be perfection, and then all of a sudden it would all come apart. A micro slip here and a caught edge there, and then nothing would work. I became a spastic skier, flailing and swearing my way along trying once again to find the fluid motions of Nordic nirvana. Ah well, practice makes perfect as they say, and I had a whole lotta practicing to do. But still, I did reasonably well, and had a whole lotta fun doing it.
                        I have no problem watching the canoe double poler in the video do his thing. As he explains, he does a body crunch leaning forward as he plants and drives his poles, and they appear to be almost properly placed inline with his shoulders, not too splayed out. But it's the almost part that concerns me. Having to clear the gunnels complicates things. Not his fault. Just those few inches makes a difference I think, despite sitting in the narrow station of a solo canoe. Losing some power of the lats and relying more on the delts might strain that all important rotator. I am not a doctor, and might be talking out of my hat, but I never want to go through that kind of physio ever again. I'm sure the guy in the vid knows what he's doing; all the power to him. I wish him well and no disrespect. But I would rather just get out, bridle the canoe, and take it for a nice wet walk upstream. Maybe I just don't know how to have fun anymore.

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                          #13
                          " Maybe I just don't know how to have fun anymore."

                          If you're not sure just ask Miranda.
                          Last edited by Iskweo; 02-25-2018, 12:23 PM.

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                            #14
                            I know a few things a bout xc skiing and Biomechanics, I'm a certified NCCP Level III xc ski coach and ski tech, worked for 6 years for the Yukon ski team and did 6 Canadian Nationals and waxed for well over a 1000 races. Just this year at the Olympics 3 xc ski athletes on the Canadian team are from our team! Paralympic sit skiers are doing this exact technique w/o problems or should I say w/o any more problems than standing skiers. You will of course have more power and speed if you are standing, but with proper technique and conditioning, there should be no problems.

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                              #15
                              Cool stuff Canot!

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