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    Getting Fleeced

    I know some of you kids use fleece pants during the shoulder seasons. What weight of fleece do you use? Do they work as a mid layer under tripping pants?

    #2
    I have several articles of fleece clothing. Two front zipper jackets, one pullover/anorak design and one pr of pants. The 2 jackets are light to mid, maybe because they're wearing thinner these days, they are far from new. I layer those under shells. The anorak I'd guess is mid-heavy weight and only worn on cold nights. It's too warm to use as a layer. But that might just be my metabolism. My pants are light-medium weight, and are also too warm to layer under a shell. I wear them exclusively for sleeping on cold nights. Otherwise I prefer merino wool bottoms as base layers year round. They're lighter and easier to layer on changeable weather days and nights, swapping out the top layers of old coated rain pants for wet chilly days, cotton or quick dry pants on temperate days, cotton or quick dry shorts on hot days. And yes, the merino long johns work great under shorts to insulate in both heat (sweaty portages) and chilling (after waist deep wades). For tops I use poly under shirts, for the same reason, they're very light, breathable, quick dry. I love my (purchased used) fleece but it's too bulky to use as a base layer, and if I were to buy a truly lightweight fleece layer I might as well go for merino.
    Last edited by Odyssey; 02-13-2020, 01:31 PM.

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      #3
      I use fleece pants under a drysuit for an insulating layer but for tripping I love my merino wool bottoms. Lots less bulky than fleece which makes me incredibly hot. ( I tried fleece PJ's once and had to throw off the covers and open the window at zero( this is counterproductive when you heat the house)

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        #4
        They make fleece pants? Are they pyjama's or something?

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          #5
          My practice is pretty much like that of yellowcanoe; merino wool or synthetic bottoms under my Fjallraven Keb or Abisko lite trekking trousers (depending on the season) on trail or while paddling and my Patagonia fleece or nano puff pants in camp. I like the wool or synthetics under the Fjallraven trousers because of their breath-ability, which combined with the venting on the Fjallraven trousers, allows for great temp control. I have also have Columbia Chiliwack pants for in-camp during the colder temps of the shoulder seasons. My birthday gift this year was a pair of Earthpak Latitude pants. I plan to try them out in-boat instead of the Fjallravens, but since they are synthetics, they might work out well in camp as well.

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            #6
            Originally posted by memaquay View Post
            They make fleece pants? Are they pyjama's or something?
            Mine are like a fleece track pant, elastic bottom hem and elastic/drawstring waist. Side slash pockets.
            They are Polar Fleece, not flannel.
            Last edited by Odyssey; 02-14-2020, 10:33 AM.

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              #7
              I have the fleece pajama style bottoms. They are loose fitting and I only wear them when watching hockey games. Our small Yorkie is quite fond of them. I too prefer wool under my synthetic or wool pants depending on temps. When it gets into the mid 20F range I wear a dry suit and in that case I usually wear fleece pants. I would call them mid weight and can’t imagine pulling pants over them and being comfortable. I would not try to portage this way either for fear of spontaneous combustion.

              if you go fleece maybe consider under wader fleece pants that have a smooth outer face, are closer fitting, and some have straps at the ankle to keep them in place when sliding the pants over them.

              barry
              My canoe can beat up your kayak.

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                #8
                Gray one piece wool Stanfield's long johns, year round. Insulated from the cold, insulated from the heat.
                "All I had were a few flies tucked into the band of my hat and an a old beaten-up Heddon rod, that had been on many trips." Sigurd F. Olson

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by memaquay View Post
                  They make fleece pants? Are they pyjama's or something?
                  We had them in the army, they were actually too warm. I prefer a bib overall or wind pants.


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                    #10
                    I'm sorta ambivalent about fleece. I recognize it's light weight, but merino wool is my baselayer, but i only have lighter weight ones. Work great for storms and sleeping in most tripping situations, but I was a little cold last fall when my outer pants were drying. Wet pants are a constant issue. It's either carry a 2nd pair, or some other dual purpose garment.

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                      #11
                      I tried fleece but quickly went back to wool which will still keep me warm if I get wet.

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                        #12
                        Yes, fleece. Perhaps being an older demographic, CT posters are wool devotees. It's what we had in the day. Or perhaps it is because they are wiser--that comes with age, too. But fleece is great and I prefer it, because it drains and dries very quickly, and provides warmth even when wet. I mentioned my January tip-out in another thread. My pants that day were nylon shell with poly lining and I was very pleased at how warm I stayed while wearing those pants, that had been entirely submerged, for about forty minutes.

                        I became a fleece devotee before I became a regular paddler. Used to do a lot of skiing, cycling and running, often in the rain. I found a rain coat caused sweat to accumulate inside the jacket (I can sweat faster than goretex can breath), so I'd just wear fleece as an outer layer. My polar-tec fleece (is there really a difference?) seemed to keep the water on the outside of the garment, kept me warm when wet, and was dry almost as soon as the rain let up. I think it is also easier to launder than wool, and moths don't eat holes in it.

                        Presently have a pant from REI, probably the forerunner of their current fleece pant (which does not claim to be polar-tec). If it was just medium cold, I wore the fleece pant under goretex rain pant or drysuit. If colder, I'd wear some poly long johns under the fleece pant. I find the REI fleece pant awkward when peeing from the drysuit, because it doesn't have an opening on the front. So at the end of last winter, I went and shopped for fleece lounge pants/pajama bottoms. Careful, most are cotton flannel, but you can find versions in wool and poly. These pants are now my standard cool weather pant for under the drysuit, keep me warm and are much easier when nature calls. I haven't been in them when they are wet, but expect they'd perform like the poly lining of the pants I recently swam in. So, keep your eye peeled for end-of-winter close outs. Nice fluffy lounge pants will be very reasonably priced.

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                          #13
                          "I'd just wear fleece as an outer layer." says Chip. I agree.
                          There's layered and then there's layerless...I stumbled upon this quite by accident one summer's day when I was too lazy to put on a shirt. Let's not get carried away with explanations, let's just accept that stuff happens. Anyway, I had old shorts on and even older boots. The bugs weren't bad so I reached into the open tent and grabbed a fleece jacket. Yes it was warm but by golly that jacket kept me both cool and warm, walking into the shade or into the sun, in the wind or out of it. No sweat, no shivers, no peeling off-putting on layers. And as these fleece fabrics breathe, and I mean really breathe (they'll never be mistaken for windbreakers) any perspiration is rapidly evaporated away.
                          Applying my lazy layerless logic in another place at another time, a family member asked me incredulously "Aren't you hot!? You're all bundled up in a long sleeved fleece!! Dad, it's July!!" Actually no, I wasn't. I had just gotten myself out of a splash pad battle with the grandkids and wanted to dry off without heating up nor chilling down. A fleece jacket worked great. The shirt stayed in the car.
                          Last edited by Odyssey; 02-14-2020, 01:21 PM.

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                            #14
                            I have Stanfields Performance Microfleece long underwear. The top is only for sleeping, and only when it's hovering around zero, otherwise it's too warm. I wear the bottoms while sleeping and keep them on as "camp pants" while mulling about in the morning, making coffee, etc. This gives me an opportunity to decide if I need them as a base layer for the rest of the day. My go-to top is a lighter, merino wool undershirt. I can wear it whether it's hot or cold and if I sweat it doesn't seem to matter.
                            Last edited by scratchypants; 02-15-2020, 06:32 AM.

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                              #15
                              For me the trouble with fleece is that it is not naturally windproof. It can be made same by inserting a membrane but then it does not feel all soft and cuddly.; it is hard. But my go to coat is out of windblock fleece for around town.

                              Because it is hydrophobic it doesn't allow sweat to pass and just repels it where it sits on your skin.. Fine if you aren't sweating; awful if you have managed to overheat and then want to eat lunch on the trail. So I kind of regard fleece like a down jacket; friendly till it gets damp.
                              Wool isn't very old fashioned. Merino wool garments are pretty recent.. What is old fashioned is Army blanket type wool.. Sometimes that is great as you can felt it to make a windproof garment. I made lots of hats and mittens out of the barbed wool ( washable wool has the natural barbs removed)

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