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Zip Lock Bags on Canoe Trips

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    #16
    I use ziplocks for items where I'll be continually getting into, and use produce bags (those thin, see through bags at the market) for one-off uses (I'll commonly bag meals together on a daily or weekly basis). For my last long trip, the grocer gave me a partial roll of bags at no cost. The produce bags are pretty sturdy, and result in a lot less bulk before and at the end of the trip. Of course I reuse the ziplocks (over, and over, and over). Occasionally I'll use the plastic grocery bags--I reuse them, and they're recyclable at the market at the end.

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      #17
      I also use zip locks for many of the same reasons that others do. Here is a use that I don't think anyone has mentioned. This tip was given to me by a friend who has a pilots license. He always has an empty gallon zip lock on him when he's flying in case he has to puke. So if you ever have to take a bush flight, which can be pretty bumpy, it's good to know you have something to puke into if needed.

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        #18
        Originally posted by lowangle al View Post
        I also use zip locks for many of the same reasons that others do. Here is a use that I don't think anyone has mentioned. This tip was given to me by a friend who has a pilots license. He always has an empty gallon zip lock on him when he's flying in case he has to puke. So if you ever have to take a bush flight, which can be pretty bumpy, it's good to know you have something to puke into if needed.
        I always had them in my flight suit! They come in really handy after about 2 hours of low level flight!

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          #19
          I was surprised that a pilot would need it, but I guess it can happen to anyone.

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            #20
            Chip, I take it back, 50 or 60 zip-locks is not excessive. Thinking outside the food barrel I do have dozens and dozens of Zip-lock bags. But those are used for things I am not continually getting into and, rarely opened, the bags and seals have lasted for years

            I forgot about all of the items in the big first aid kit and in the spares & repairs kit; lots of items stored in 2” x 4” and smaller zip lock bags from my laboratory days. Zip-locks smaller and sturdier than the typical sandwich size are really handy.

            That’s at least a couple dozen small zip locks. With Sharpie labels; iodine crystal solution, oral numbing gel, wraps and bandages, finger splints, spare nut and bolt hardware, epoxy putty and vinyl repair kit, etc.

            Eh, more than dozens

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              #21
              Originally posted by Mason View Post

              I always had them in my flight suit! They come in really handy after about 2 hours of low level flight!
              When I used to refuel fighters on long overwater deployment flights, There was a time when one said to us, "hey, watch this...." as he performed a barrel roll off our wing. Impressive. Then one of us said "hey, watch this....." while apparently nothing much visible happened. "What was that?" "Well, the pilot just left his seat and went back to the can to take a leak and then to the galley to grab a sandwich...." Since my son was a fighter jock I can tell these stories.

              Zip locks? Dozens and dozens. Most of my home dehydrated food is double bagged, When they get full and bulky for a hiking crew meal, I always fold over the top and put a thick rubber band over to keep it closed. Dozens and dozens of rubber bands. I always tell the student cook to slip them on their wrist for ease of later disposal and reuse.

              "She's all my fancy painted her, she's lovely, she is light. She waltzes on the waves by day and rests with me at night." - Nessmuk, Forest and Stream, July 21, 1880 [of the Wood Drake Canoe built for him by Rushton]

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                #22
                Here's a good source for odd sized bags...

                https://www.clearbags.com/bags/food

                Best regards to all,


                Lance

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                  #23
                  I try to do like Turtle with the colored bag system, but I tend to pre-pack my meals in ziplocks... e.g., my breakfast is oatmeal, so i put a half cup of oatmeal, a tbsp of Nido powder, a tbsp of brown sugar, and a handful of raisins in a bag, roll it up, and that's a breakfast. I often tuck a teabag in with it, so i'm not looking for that elsewhere (i'm very uncoordinated when i wake up, and truly hate mornings.) My lunches look like MREs... a ziplock containing a bagel, jerky/landjaeger, tea, cocoa, or soup, cheese stick, and some dried fruit. Dinner is mostly Hawkvittles, so they're self contained. I'll take all my breakfast bags and put them in a plastic shopping bag of a color, and do the same with the lunches and dinners. My variation is a 4th bag which contains snacks, drink mixes, and (in a zip lock) some paper towels. I calculate about 3 sheets per day, mostly to wipe out my pot.

                  Other than meals, I don't use a lot of them for organizing anything... I rely on a simple one-big-compartment pack design for things like cookware, shelter, bedding, food bag, and clothes, inside a garbage bag if backpacking or drybag if canoeing. I prefer 3 outer compartments (two small one large) as carriers for water bottles and as a 'junk drawer' containing everything else. The junk drawer items that can't get wet go in a small orange dry bag. the others just go in the pocket. My hatchet tucks in with one water bottle, and a saw goes in the other if long, or in the junk drawer if short/folding. My cell phone goes in its own dry bag in my pocket. Spare batteries get taped together and dated for rotation, in the orange bag, along with my TP, First Aid Kit, repair kit, pad and paper, and headlamp. Things like sunscreen, bug spray, compass, bungies, cordage, spoon, sheath knife, water treatment, hygiene kit (toothbrush, paste, comb, soap, washcloth, pack towel) etc, don't care if they get wet, and go loose in the junk drawer. Sometimes the hygiene kit goes inside the pack.

                  I did just get a nice Sea To Summit drybag with integrated pack harness for Christmas, which has no outside pockets, but that's just for canoe trips, and I'll keep my water in a small pack that gets attached to it during portages. The rest of the system will stay pretty much the same.
                  Take a course in good water and air; and in the eternal youth of Nature you may renew your own. Go quietly, alone; no harm will befall you. John Muir

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                    #24
                    Thank you to all who replied to this post. It is interesting to learn that I'm in good company in my reliance on zip-locks. I appreciate the good suggestions on different ways to pack a food barrel and to learn a other uses for these handy little sacks we call zip locks.

                    Zip locks were invented in the 50s, first became commercially available as cooking bags in the 60s and then became popular for food storage in the 70s. It is always amazing to me to consider that people have been canoe camping for hundreds of years without all the gear we have now. Zip locks are just one example of gear that didn't exist and now all of us use.

                    Here's two more reasons to carry zip-locks: to have someplace other than the woods to leave used toilet paper--I know, I know, leave no trace, but if you can't do that, at least don't litter the TP, and to have someplace to store any edible mushrooms you run across.

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                      #25
                      I only use zip locks for items that need extra protection from moisture - cell phone, permits, tp, etc. For food I use cheap, commercial restaurant, plastic bags - $10 for 500.

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                        #26
                        How do you guys solo trip with such food packs? I have to combine food with other items or I won't have the room in just 2 packs.

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                          #27
                          We'll use large ziplocks for organising meal groups but dry meal ingredients will go in wax paper bags, taped up with paper masking tape. The great thing about these is that they burn really well so can be used for fire lighting. We do use small ziplocks for wet ingredients like pastes though true liquids go in Nalgene or other similar bottles I borrow from the surplus stock we have for taking water samples. Not surprisingly we also use my own barrel organisers as well so worries about colour coding individual bags, lined with Refectix these also make decent coolers.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Black_Fly View Post
                            How do you guys solo trip with such food packs? I have to combine food with other items or I won't have the room in just 2 packs.
                            One 30 l food barrel and one pack. I seem not to pack compactly so my 115 liter pack does for everything else.

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