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SUMMARY - Swift Otter Rebuild

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    SUMMARY - Swift Otter Rebuild

    Left outside, on the ground, without cover for quite a few years, this 23 year old canoe was in sad shape. Nonetheless the canoe's hull was in good shape. After taking off the adaptive seats made of 3/4 inch pressure treated marine plywood, the canoe weighed in at 45 lbs. Pretty light for a 15 foot tandem and worthy of saving.

    BEFORE

    All the wood rotted, seat webbing rotted, a carry handle missing,

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    Gunwale powder coating eroding off, a black crud covering the hull everywhere


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    Desk plate pock marks


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    Rivets corroded and failing


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    AFTER

    The rebuild included:

    Wet sanding 3 times took all the black crud off the hull - using 400, 600, and 1,200 grit

    Drilled out and replaced 64 rivets, not taking any chances on more rivet failures

    Painting - Gunnels brushed with an enamel paint on the first coat and then rolled on the second coat. The result was a lightly textured, yet very smooth feel. Spray paint for the deck plate

    Repair Investments
    $120 - wood work
    $35 - brush and spray enamel
    $7 - rivets
    $15 - wet sand paper
    Total - $177

    The project had me purchase two new tools - a random orbital sander - thanks for that suggestion MIke, it sure made the project easier. And another item that while not essential, really helped expedite the work - a wheeled shop stool.

    PHOTOS

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    #2
    Sweet! I had an Otter once and like yours it had lived outside too long. We did fiddle with the seats to cant them. We found flat seats very uncomfortable. Its a five minute fix to put spacer washers under the back end.

    I sold it. Wish I hadn't sometimes

    Comment


      #3
      Nice work! Great to see boats being resuscitated for a new life on the water. That sanding of the hull must've been messy with all that black powder, but it sure cleaned up nice. Did you fill those gouges in the deck plate with anything?
      Paddlemaking.blogspot.com

      Comment


        #4
        The cavities in the deck plate were filled with Gflex and then sanded. The after photo of the deck plate is the same deck plate with the pock marks; I was pleased with the way it came out.

        Wet sanding is messy, so that was performed in the driveway.

        Comment


          #5
          Is your swift a fiberglass boat? Very nice job!

          John

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks for the compliments.

            Hull material. Not really sure, but from researching the specs Swift had of that canoe the weight suggests it is Kevlar. Swift had the fiberglass at 48 lbs and the kevlar at 45 lbs.

            Either way, it is an easy lift to the shoulders!

            Comment


              #7
              wow -- great work!

              1200 -- that's some true sanding grit there

              but beautiful results

              Comment


                #8
                Final Touches

                Outfitting the canoe for traveling is always a satisfying conclusion to restoration. Installed both handles.

                For tie off loops, I invested about $8 in colored webbing to compliment the brown tones in the canoe. I still have some other minor details to work on, but the canoe is ready for use; Sunday looks to be the day to get it back on the river.

                Here is the canoe outfitted for solo travel.

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                Comment


                  #9
                  Sweet!

                  Comment

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